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Родина картопляних

Medium Long Eggplant Seeds

2.200 Seeds Medium Long...

Ціна 8,35 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>2200 Seeds Medium Long Eggplant</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Price for Package of 2200 seeds (10g).</span></strong></span></h2> <div>Early medium maturing variety, tolerant to heat and humidity, vigorous growth, strong diseases resistance, long harvest period, long straight fruit, beautiful shape, glossy purple skin, good quality, extremly high yield, each fruit is about 28-35 cm in length, 4.5-6 cm in diameter, 250-400g in weight.</div> <div>The eggplant, brinjal eggplant, aubergine, melongene, brinjal or guinea squash (Solanum melongena) is a plant of the family Solanaceae (also known as the nightshades) and genus Solanum. It bears a fruit of the same name, commonly used in cooking. As a nightshade, it is closely related to the tomato and potato. It was domesticated in India from Solanum incanum.</div> <div>It is a delicate perennial often cultivated as an annual. It grows 40 to 150 cm (16 to 57 in) tall, with large, coarsely lobed leaves that are 10 to 20 cm (4–8 in) long and 5 to 10 cm (2–4 in) broad. Semiwild types can grow much larger, to 225 cm (7 ft) with large leaves over 30 cm (12 in) long and 15 cm (6 in) broad. The stem is often spiny. The flower is white to purple, with a five-lobed corolla and yellow stamens. The fruit is fleshy, has a meaty texture. It is less than 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter on wild plants, but much larger in cultivated forms.</div> <div>The fruit is botanically classified as a berry and contains numerous small, soft seeds which are edible, but have a bitter taste because they contain nicotinoid alkaloids; this is unsurprising as it is a close relative of tobacco.</div> <div>History</div> <div>The plant is native to the Indian Subcontinent.[1][2] It has been cultivated in southern and eastern Asia since prehistory,[citation needed] but appears to have become known to the Western world no earlier than circa 1500. The first known written record of the plant is found in Qí mín yào shù, an ancient Chinese agricultural treatise completed in 544.[4] The numerous Arabic and North African names for it, along with the lack of the ancient Greek and Roman names, indicate it was introduced throughout the Mediterranean area by the Arabs in the early Middle Ages. The specific name melongena is derived from a 16th-century Arabic term for one variety.</div> <div>The name "aubergine" is from the French, a diminutive of auberge, a variant of alberge, ‘a kind of peach’ or from the Spanish alberchigo or alverchiga, ‘an apricocke’.[5] It may be also be derived from Catalan albergínia, from Arabic al-baðinjān from Persian bâdenjân, from Sanskrit vātiga-gama).</div> <div>Aubergine is also the name of the purple color resembling that of the fruit,[5] and is a commonly known color scheme[6] applied to articles as diverse as cloth or bathroom suites.</div> <div>The popular name "eggplant" is used in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. It derives from the fruits of some 18th-century European cultivars which were yellow or white and resembled goose or hen's eggs.[7] In Indian native languages Hindi and Urdu, it is called "Baingan"or"Baigan".[8]</div> <div>In Indian, South African, Malaysian and Singaporean English, the fruit is called baigan brinjal, being derived directly from the Portuguese beringela. A less common British English word is melongene, which is also from French (derived) from Italian melanzana from Greek μελιτζάνα. In the Caribbean Trinidad, it also goes by meloongen from melongene.</div> <div>Because of the plant's relationship with the Solanaceae (nightshade) family, the fruit was at one time believed to be extremely poisonous. The flowers and leaves, though, can be poisonous if consumed in large quantities, due to the presence of solanine.[9]</div> <div>Cooking  </div> <div>The raw fruit can have a somewhat bitter taste, but becomes tender when cooked and develops a rich, complex flavor. Many recipes advise salting, rinsing and draining of the sliced fruit (known as "degorging"), to soften it and to reduce the amount of fat absorbed during cooking, but mainly to remove the bitterness of the earlier cultivars. Some modern varieties - including large, purple varieties commonly imported into western Europe - do not need this treatment. The fruit is capable of absorbing large amounts of cooking fats and sauces, making for very rich dishes, but salting reduces the amount of oil absorbed. The fruit flesh is smooth; as in the related tomato, the numerous seeds are soft and edible along with the rest of the fruit. The thin skin is also edible.</div> <div>The plant is used in the cuisine of many countries. It is often stewed, as in the French ratatouille, or deep fried as in the Italian parmigiana di melanzane, the Turkish karnıyarık or Turkish and Greek musakka/moussaka, and Middle-Eastern and South Asian dishes. Eggplants can also be battered before deep-frying and served with a sauce made of tahini and tamarind. In Iranian cuisine, it can be blended with whey as kashk e-bademjan, tomatoes as mirza ghasemi or made into stew as khoresh-e-bademjan. It can be sliced and deep-fried, then served with plain yogurt, (optionally) topped with a tomato and garlic sauce, such as in the Turkish dish patlıcan kızartması (meaning: fried aubergines) or without yogurt as in patlıcan şakşuka. Perhaps the best-known Turkish eggplant dishes are İmam bayıldı (vegetarian) and Karnıyarık (with minced meat).</div> <div>It may also be roasted in its skin until charred, so the pulp can be removed and blended with other ingredients, such as lemon, tahini, and garlic, as in the Middle Eastern baba ghanoush and the similar Greek melitzanosalata. Grilled, mashed and mixed with onions, tomatoes and spices make the Indian and Pakistani dish baingan ka Bhartha or gojju, similar to salată de vinete in Romania, while a mix of roasted eggplant, roasted red peppers, chopped onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, carrots, celery and spices is called zacuscă in Romania or ajvar in Croatia and the Balkans. A simpler version of the dish, baigan-pora (eggplant-charred or burnt), is very popular in the east Indian states of Orissa and Bengal, and Bangladesh where the pulp of vegetable is mixed with raw chopped onions, green chillies, salt and mustard oil. Sometimes fried whole tomatoes and burnt potatoes are also added which is called baigan bharta. A Spanish dish called escalivada calls for strips of roasted aubergine, sweet pepper, onion and tomato. In Spain, is typical to find eggplant as berenjenas de Almagro. There, eggplants are also cooked with vinegar, red peppers, paprika and olive oil.</div> <div>The fruit can also be hollowed out and stuffed with meat, rice, or other fillings, and then baked. In the Caucasus, for example, it is fried and stuffed with walnut paste to make nigvziani badrijani. It can also be found in Chinese cuisine, braised (紅燒茄子), stewed (魚香茄子), steamed (凉拌茄子), or stuffed (釀茄子).</div> <div>As a native plant, it is widely used in Indian cuisine, for example in sambhar, dalma (a dal preparation with vegetables, native to Orissa), chutney, curry, and achaar. Owing to its versatile nature and wide use in both everyday and festive Indian food, it is often described (under the name brinjal) as the "king of vegetables". In one dish[which?], brinjal is stuffed with ground coconut, peanuts, and masala, and then cooked in oil.</div> <div>Cultivation</div> <div>In tropical and subtropical climates, eggplant can be sown directly into the garden. Eggplant grown in temperate climates fares better when transplanted into the garden after all danger of frost is passed. Seeds are typically started eight to 10 weeks prior to the anticipated frost-free date.</div> <div>Many pests and diseases which afflict other solanaceous plants, such as tomato, pepper (capsicum), and potato, are also troublesome to eggplants. For this reason, it should not be planted in areas previously occupied by its close relatives. Four years should separate successive crops of eggplants. Common North American pests include the potato beetles, flea beetles, aphids, and spider mites. (Adults can be removed by hand, though flea beetles can be especially difficult to control.) Good sanitation and crop rotation practices are extremely important for controlling fungal disease, the most serious of which is Verticillium.</div> <div>Spacing should be 45 cm (18 in.) to 60 cm (24 in.) between plants, depending on cultivar, and 60 cm to 90 cm (24 to 36 in.) between rows, depending on the type of cultivation equipment being used. Mulching will help conserve moisture and prevent weeds and fungal diseases. The flowers are relatively unattractive to bees and the first blossoms often do not set fruit. Hand pollination will improve the set of the first blossoms. Fruits are typically cut from the vine just above the calyx owing to the somewhat woody stems. Flowers are complete, containing both female and male structures, and may be self-pollinated or cross-pollinated.</div> <div> <p><em><strong>Health properties</strong></em></p> </div> <table cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Eggplant, raw</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Energy</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">102 kJ (24 kcal)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Carbohydrates</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">5.7 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>- </strong><strong>Sugars</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2.35 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>- </strong><strong>Dietary fiber</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">3.4 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Fat</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.19 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Protein</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1.01 g</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Thiamine (vit. B<sub>1</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.039 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Riboflavin (vit. B<sub>2</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.037 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Niacin (vit. B<sub>3</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.649 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Pantothenic acid (B<sub>5</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.281 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Vitamin B<sub>6</sub></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.084 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Folate (vit. B<sub>9</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">22 μg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Vitamin C</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2.2 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Calcium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">9 mg (1%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Iron</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.24 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Magnesium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">14 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Manganese</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.25 mg (12%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Phosphorus</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">25 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Potassium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">230 mg (5%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Zinc</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.16 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Percentages are relative to</span><br /><span style="color: #008000;">US recommendations for adults.</span><br /><span style="color: #008000;">Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>A 1998 study at the Institute of Biology of São Paulo State University, Brazil, found eggplant juice to significantly reduce weight, plasma cholesterol levels, and aortic cholesterol content in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.<sup>[13]</sup></p> <p>The results of a 2000 study on humans suggested <em>S. melongena</em> infusion had a modest and transitory effect, no different from diet and exercise.<sup>[14]</sup></p> <p>A 2004 study on humans at the Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo found no effects at all and did not recommend eggplant as an alternative to statins.<sup>[15]</sup></p> <p>The nicotine content of aubergines, though low in absolute terms, is higher than any other edible plant, with a concentration of 0.01 mg per 100 g. The amount of nicotine consumed by eating eggplant or any other food is negligible compared to being in the presence of a smoker.<sup>[16]</sup> On average, 9 kg (20 lbs) of eggplant contains about the same amount of nicotine as a cigarette.</p> <div> <p><em><strong>Allergies</strong></em></p> </div> <p>Case reports of itchy skin or mouth, mild headache, and stomach upset after handling or eating eggplant have been reported anecdotally and published in medical journals (see also oral allergy syndrome). A 2008 study of a sample of 741 people in India, where eggplant is commonly consumed, found nearly 10% reported some allergic symptoms after consuming eggplant, while 1.4% showed symptoms within less than two hours.<sup>[17]</sup> Contact dermatitis from eggplant leaves<sup>[18]</sup> and allergy to eggplant flower pollen<sup>[19]</sup> have also been reported. Individuals who are atopic(genetically predisposed to developing certain allergic hypersensitivity reactions) are more likely to have a reaction to eggplant, which may be because eggplant is high in histamines. A few proteins and at least one secondary metabolite have been identified as potential allergens.<sup>[20]</sup> Cooking eggplant thoroughly seems to preclude reactions in some individuals, but at least one of the allergenic proteins survives the cooking process.</p> </body> </html>
P 101 (10g)
Medium Long Eggplant Seeds
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Разнообразие из Таиланда
Thai Green Eggplant Seeds (Solanum melongena)

Thai Round Green Eggplant...

Ціна 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Thai Green Eggplant Seeds (Solanum melongena)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#fd0202;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Thai eggplant is the name for several varieties of eggplant used in Southeast Asian cuisines, most often of the eggplant species Solanum melongena. They are also cultivated in Sri Lanka and feature in Sri Lankan cuisine. These golf ball sized eggplants are commonly used in Thai cuisine. Some of the cultivars in Thailand are Thai Purple, Thai Green, Thai Yellow, and Thai White.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>The green-white varieties of Thai eggplants are essential ingredients in Thai curry dishes such as in kaeng tai pla,[2] green[3] and red curry. They are often halved or quartered, but can also be used whole, and cooked in the curry sauce where they become softer and absorb the flavor of the sauce. They are also eaten raw in Thai salads or with Thai chili pastes (nam phrik).</span></p> <p><span>Sometimes, in Thai restaurants outside of Thailand, Thai eggplants are replaced by locally available eggplants.</span></p>
P 394
Thai Green Eggplant Seeds (Solanum melongena)
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Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant Seeds (Solanum ferox) 2 - 1

Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant...

Ціна 2,25 €
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant Seeds (Solanum ferox)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Tarambulo is a small, suberect, prickly, hairy herb, 0.5 to 1.5 meters high. Leaves are broadly ovate, 15 to 20 centimeters long, 12 to 23 centimeters wide, lobed at the margins, and densely covered with stiff wooly hairs above and wooly hairs and prickly spines on the nerves beneath; the lobes are triangular and 2.5 to 4 centimeters deep. Flowers are borne on lateral racemes. The calyx is shortly funnel-shaped, with ovate-triangular lobes. Corolla is densely wooly outside, white, oblong-loved, 2 to 2.5 centimeters long.</p> <p>The fruit is an EDIBLE berry, yellow, globose, 2.5 to 3.5 centimeters in diameter, densely covered with needle-like hairs, and many-seeded.</p>
P 424
Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant Seeds (Solanum ferox) 2 - 1
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Organic Black Beauty Eggplant Seeds 1.8 - 1

Organic Black Beauty...

Ціна 1,80 €
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5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Organic Black Beauty Eggplant Seeds</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds. </strong></span></h3> <p>HEIRLOOM. From 1902, it remains a standard worldwide for large-fruited black eggplant. The plump, slightly lobed, rich flavored fruits of this heirloom are a beautiful, shiny purple black and are typically used for making Eggplant Parmesan.</p> <p>Over 100 years old, this 1902 introduction was an immediate hit because the plants ripened perfect fruits dramatically earlier than other varieties. It became the common market eggplant of today. Harvested fresh, however, makes all the difference.</p>
P 380
Organic Black Beauty Eggplant Seeds 1.8 - 1
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Turkey Berry - Pea Eggplant Seeds (Solanum torvum)

Turkey Berry - Pea Eggplant...

Ціна 1,95 €
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Turkey Berry - Pea Eggplant Seeds (Solanum torvum)</strong></h2> <h2 style="font-family:'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;color:#333333;"><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 оr 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Solanum torvum is a bushy, erect and spiny perennial plant used horticulturally as a rootstock for eggplant. Grafted plants are very vigorous and tolerate diseases affecting the root system, thus allowing the crop to continue for a second year.</p> <p>It is also known as turkey berry, prickly nightshade, shoo-shoo bush, wild eggplant, pea eggplant, pea aubergine, susumber ( Jamaica), boo, terongan, tekokak, berenjena cimarrona, berenjena de gallina, berenjena silvestre, tabacón, pendejera, tomatillo, bâtard balengène, zamorette, friega-platos, kudanekayi (Kannada: ಕುದನೆಕಾಯಿ), sundaikkai (Tamil: சுண்டைக்காய்),[3] (Malayalam: ചുണ്ട ), thibbatu (Sinhala), makhuea phuang (Thai: มะเขือพวง), suzume nasu (Japan: 雀茄子), jurubeba (Brazilian Portuguese), and many other names (Howard 1989, Little and others 1974, Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk 2001).</p> <p>The plant is usually 2 or 3 m in height and 2 cm in basal diameter, but may reach 5m in height and 8 cm in basal diameter. The shrub usually has a single stem at ground level, but it may branch on the lower stem. The stem bark is gray and nearly smooth with raised lenticels. The inner bark has a green layer over an ivory color (Little and others 1974). The plants examined by the author, growing on firm soil, had weak taproots and well-developed laterals. The roots are white. Foliage is confined to the growing twigs.</p> <p>The twigs are gray-green and covered with star-shaped hairs. The spines are short and slightly curved and vary from thick throughout the plant, including the leaf midrib, to entirely absent. The leaves are opposite or one per node, broadly ovate with the border entire or deeply lobed. The petioles are 1 to 6 cm long and the blades are 7 to 23 by 5 to 18 cm and covered with short hairs. The flowers are white, tubular with 5 pointed lobes, and grouped in corymbiform cymes. They are shed soon after opening.</p> <p>The fruits are berries that grow in clusters of tiny green spheres (ca. 1 cm in diameter) that look like green peas. They become yellow when fully ripe. They are thin-fleshed and contain numerous flat, round, brown seeds (Howard 1989, Liogier 1995, Little and others 1974).</p> <p><strong>Range</strong></p> <p>Turkey berry apparently is native from Florida and southern Alabama through the West Indies and from Mexico through Central America and South America through Brazil (Little and others 1974). Because of its rapid spread as a weed in disturbed lands, it is difficult to tell which populations are native and which are introduced. Turkey berry has been introduced and naturalized throughout tropical Africa, Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands including Hawaii, Guam, and American Samoa (Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk 2001). In Jamaica this berry is called susumba, or gully beans, and is usually cooked in a dish along with saltfish and ackee. It is believed to be full of iron (it does have a strong iron like taste when eaten) and is consumed when one is low in iron.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>In Puerto Rico, turkey berry grows in upland sites that receive from about 1000 to 4000 mm of annual precipitation. It also grows in riparian zones in drier areas. Turkey berry grows on all types of moist, fertile soil at elevations from near sea level to almost 1,000 m in Puerto Rico (Little and others 1974) and 2,000 m in Papua New Guinea (Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk 2001). Given an equal start after disturbance, turkey berry quickly overtops most herbs, grasses, and other shrubs. It grows best in full sunlight and does well in light shade or shade for part of the day, but cannot survive under a closed forest canopy. Turkey berry single plants, groups, and thickets are most frequently seen on roadsides, vacant lots, brushy pastures, recently abandoned farmland, landslides, and river banks.</p> <p><strong>Reproduction</strong></p> <p>Flowering and fruiting is continuous after the shrubs reach about 1 to 1.5 m in height. Ripe fruits collected in Puerto Rico averaged 1.308 + 0.052 g. Air dry seeds from these fruits weighed an average of 0.00935 g or 1,070,000 seeds/kg. These seeds were sown on commercial potting mix and 60 percent germinated between 13 and 106 days following sowing. The seedlings are common in recently disturbed ground. Frugivorous birds eat the fruits and spread the seeds (Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk 2001). Turkey berry can be propagated vegetatively by placing branch cuttings, with or without leaves, in a mist chamber for one month (Badola and others 1993).</p> <p><strong>Growth and management</strong></p> <p>Turkey berry grows about 0.75 to 1.5 m in height per year. The species is not long-lived; most plants live about 2 years. Physical control of the shrub may be done by grubbing out the plants; lopping will not kill them. They can be killed by translocated herbicides applied to the leaves or the cut stumps (Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk 2001).</p> <p><strong>Cuisine</strong></p> <p>The green fresh fruits are edible and used in Thai cuisine, as an ingredient in certain Thai curries or raw in certain Thai chili pastes (nam phrik).[4][5] They are also used in Lao cuisine (Royal Horticultural Society 2001) and Jamaican cuisine.[6] The fruits are incorporated into soups and sauces in the Côte d'Ivoire (Herzog and Gautier-Béguin 2001).</p> <p>In Tamil Nadu, India, the fruit is consumed directly, or as cooked food like Sundaikkai Sambar, Sundaikkai Poriyal, Sundaikkai Aviyal &amp; Sundaikkai Pulikulambu. After soaking in curd and drying, the final product is fried in oil as Sundaikkai vattral (available in all Tamil Nadu supermarkets), it is famous all around in Tamil Nadu. In siddha medicine one of the traditional systems of India Sundaivattral Choornam is used to improve digestion.</p> <p><strong>Haitian Mythology</strong></p> <p>This fruit is reportedly used in Haitian voodoo rituals.</p> <p><strong>Chemistry</strong></p> <p>Turkey berry contains a number of potentially pharmacologically active chemicals including the sapogenin steroid chlorogenin.</p> <p>Aqueous extracts of turkey berry are lethal to mice by depressing the number of erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets in their blood (Tapia and others 1996). A related chemical, cholecalciferol, is the active ingredient in a number of commercial rodenticides.</p> <p>Extracts of the plant are reported to be useful in the treatment of hyperactivity, colds and cough, pimples, skin diseases, and leprosy.</p> <p>Methyl caffeate, extracted from the fruit of S. torvum, shows an antidiabetic effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.</p> <p>Cholinergic poisoning has been reported as a result of the consumption of Solanum torvum berries prepared in Jamaican dishes.</p> <p> </p>
P 364
Turkey Berry - Pea Eggplant Seeds (Solanum torvum)
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African eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)

African eggplant Seeds...

Ціна 2,45 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">African eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>African eggplants of the Kumba group have a depressed globular shape with deep furrows and range from 5-15 centimeters in diameter. The fruit may be harvested green, white or even red, and the leaves are occasionally eaten as a sautéed vegetable as well. This variety is firm and bitter and best stewed or pickled.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong></p> <p>African eggplants are botanically classified as Solanum aethiopicum and also commonly known as Mock Tomato, Bitter Tomato, Ethiopian nightshade and Scarlet Eggplant. They range widely in color and shape depending upon the cultivar and are divided into four groups: Gilo, Shum, Kumba and Aculeatum. This particular variety of African eggplant is of the Kumba Group.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong></p> <p>African eggplant leaves are rich on beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, iron and calcium. The fruits bitter taste is attributed to furostanol glycosides (saponins).</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p>The leaves and young shoots of the African eggplant are just as important as the fruits themselves. Containing most of the plant’s nutritional value, they are used in soups, stews, sautés and even pickled. The inherent bitterness of the African eggplant is complimented by slightly sweet flavors, rich proteins and smoked meats. They take well to strong flavors of curry or long braises in a simple blend of oil and garlic. Pair the leaves and fruits in recipes that include nutty cheeses such as parmesan, ham, bacon, sausage, caramelized onions or mushrooms, sweet potatoes, beans and peanuts.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Ethnic - Cultural Info</strong></p> <p>A similar eggplant variety found in Brazil is referred to as jiló, and often breaded in cornmeal and fried, like green tomatoes in American Southern cuisine.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Geography - History</strong></p> <p>African eggplants are grown predominantly in their native home of Africa, specifically in Central and West Africa. They have since been introduced into the Caribbean and South America and are even grown in some of the warmer climates of southern Italy.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>Propagation</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Basic requirements</strong></p> <p>Growth requirements for African eggplant vary with variety. All types grow best in full sun in well-draining, deep soils with a pH between 5.5 and 6.8. Gilo types grow best at daytime temperatures between 25 and 35°C (77 and 95°F). Kumba types can grow in hotter temperatures of up to 45°C in low humidity, whereas Shum types require warm and humid conditions in order to thrive. No varieties of African eggplant tolerate very cold or water-logged conditions.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Growing from seed</strong></p> <p>African eggplant seeds can be collected from fully ripe fruits. Once the seeds have been extracted, they should be laid out on a piece paper to dry in a place where they are not exposed to direct sunlight. Once dry, seeds can be stored for many years and still remain viable. Seeds should be planted in a prepared nursery bed and should be sown 15 cm (6 in) apart with a further 20 cm (8 in) between rows. Seedlings are ready for transplanting when they reach 15 to 20 cm (6–8 in) in height and have 5–7 leaves. Plants should be hardened prior to transplanting by gradually reducing the amount of water they receive. Plants should be spaced 50 cm (20 in) apart allowing 75 cm (30 in) between rows.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>General care and maintenance</strong></p> <p>African eggplants will benefit from frequent irrigation during the dry season, particularly when fruiting, to ensure high yields. The crop should be weeded as required to prevent competition. Addition of fertilizer in the form of cattle or chicken or cattle manure or compost will improve yields.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Harvesting</strong></p> <p>African eggplant is typically ready for harvest 100 to 120 days after planting. The fruit should be harvested before the skin changes color from white to pale yellow when the skin becomes tough. Fruits should be harvested regularly to encourage maximum fruit production. Young leaves may be harvested from 45-60 days of growth.</p>
P 347
African eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)
  • Новий
Ronde De Valence Eggplant Seeds  - 4

Ronde De Valence Eggplant...

Ціна 2,25 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>RONDE DE VALENCE EGGPLANT SEEDS (AUBERGINE)</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 30 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Lovely, black fruit are almost perfectly round in shape and the size of a grapefruit, with deep purple color. A wonderful variety for stuffing, with great-tasting, tender flesh. A traditional French heirloom named after the city of Valence, a quaint city on the Rhone River.</p> <p>The eggplant, brinjal eggplant, aubergine, melongene, brinjal or guinea squash (Solanum melongena) is a plant of the family Solanaceae (also known as the nightshades) and genus Solanum. It bears a fruit of the same name, commonly used in cooking. As a nightshade, it is closely related to the tomato and potato. It was domesticated in India from Solanum incanum.</p> <p>It is a delicate perennial often cultivated as an annual. It grows 40 to 150 cm (16 to 57 in) tall, with large, coarsely lobed leaves that are 10 to 20 cm (4–8 in) long and 5 to 10 cm (2–4 in) broad. Semiwild types can grow much larger, to 225 cm (7 ft) with large leaves over 30 cm (12 in) long and 15 cm (6 in) broad. The stem is often spiny. The flower is white to purple, with a five-lobed corolla and yellow stamens. The fruit is fleshy, has a meaty texture. It is less than 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter on wild plants, but much larger in cultivated forms.</p> <p>The fruit is botanically classified as a berry and contains numerous small, soft seeds which are edible, but have a bitter taste because they contain nicotinoid alkaloids; this is unsurprising as it is a close relative of tobacco.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The plant is native to the Indian Subcontinent.[1][2] It has been cultivated in southern and eastern Asia since prehistory,[citation needed] but appears to have become known to the Western world no earlier than circa 1500. The first known written record of the plant is found in Qí mín yào shù, an ancient Chinese agricultural treatise completed in 544.[4] The numerous Arabic and North African names for it, along with the lack of the ancient Greek and Roman names, indicate it was introduced throughout the Mediterranean area by the Arabs in the early Middle Ages. The specific name melongena is derived from a 16th-century Arabic term for one variety.</p> <p>The name "aubergine" is from the French, a diminutive of auberge, a variant of alberge, ‘a kind of peach’ or from the Spanish alberchigo or alverchiga, ‘an apricocke’.[5] It may be also be derived from Catalan albergínia, from Arabic al-baðinjān from Persian bâdenjân, from Sanskrit vātiga-gama).</p> <p>Aubergine is also the name of the purple color resembling that of the fruit,[5] and is a commonly known color scheme[6] applied to articles as diverse as cloth or bathroom suites.</p> <p>The popular name "eggplant" is used in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. It derives from the fruits of some 18th-century European cultivars which were yellow or white and resembled goose or hen's eggs.[7] In Indian native languages Hindi and Urdu, it is called "Baingan"or"Baigan".[8]</p> <p>In Indian, South African, Malaysian and Singaporean English, the fruit is called baigan brinjal, being derived directly from the Portuguese beringela. A less common British English word is melongene, which is also from French (derived) from Italian melanzana from Greek μελιτζάνα. In the Caribbean Trinidad, it also goes by meloongen from melongene.</p> <p>Because of the plant's relationship with the Solanaceae (nightshade) family, the fruit was at one time believed to be extremely poisonous. The flowers and leaves, though, can be poisonous if consumed in large quantities, due to the presence of solanine.[9]</p> <p><strong>Cooking  </strong></p> <p>The raw fruit can have a somewhat bitter taste, but becomes tender when cooked and develops a rich, complex flavor. Many recipes advise salting, rinsing and draining of the sliced fruit (known as "degorging"), to soften it and to reduce the amount of fat absorbed during cooking, but mainly to remove the bitterness of the earlier cultivars. Some modern varieties - including large, purple varieties commonly imported into western Europe - do not need this treatment. The fruit is capable of absorbing large amounts of cooking fats and sauces, making for very rich dishes, but salting reduces the amount of oil absorbed. The fruit flesh is smooth; as in the related tomato, the numerous seeds are soft and edible along with the rest of the fruit. The thin skin is also edible.</p> <p>The plant is used in the cuisine of many countries. It is often stewed, as in the French ratatouille, or deep fried as in the Italian parmigiana di melanzane, the Turkish karnıyarık or Turkish and Greek musakka/moussaka, and Middle-Eastern and South Asian dishes. Eggplants can also be battered before deep-frying and served with a sauce made of tahini and tamarind. In Iranian cuisine, it can be blended with whey as kashk e-bademjan, tomatoes as mirza ghasemi or made into stew as khoresh-e-bademjan. It can be sliced and deep-fried, then served with plain yogurt, (optionally) topped with a tomato and garlic sauce, such as in the Turkish dish patlıcan kızartması (meaning: fried aubergines) or without yogurt as in patlıcan şakşuka. Perhaps the best-known Turkish eggplant dishes are İmam bayıldı (vegetarian) and Karnıyarık (with minced meat).</p> <p>It may also be roasted in its skin until charred, so the pulp can be removed and blended with other ingredients, such as lemon, tahini, and garlic, as in the Middle Eastern baba ghanoush and the similar Greek melitzanosalata. Grilled, mashed and mixed with onions, tomatoes and spices make the Indian and Pakistani dish baingan ka Bhartha or gojju, similar to salată de vinete in Romania, while a mix of roasted eggplant, roasted red peppers, chopped onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, carrots, celery and spices is called zacuscă in Romania or ajvar in Croatia and the Balkans. A simpler version of the dish, baigan-pora (eggplant-charred or burnt), is very popular in the east Indian states of Orissa and Bengal, and Bangladesh where the pulp of vegetable is mixed with raw chopped onions, green chillies, salt and mustard oil. Sometimes fried whole tomatoes and burnt potatoes are also added which is called baigan bharta. A Spanish dish called escalivada calls for strips of roasted aubergine, sweet pepper, onion and tomato. In Spain, is typical to find eggplant as berenjenas de Almagro. There, eggplants are also cooked with vinegar, red peppers, paprika and olive oil.</p> <p>The fruit can also be hollowed out and stuffed with meat, rice, or other fillings, and then baked. In the Caucasus, for example, it is fried and stuffed with walnut paste to make nigvziani badrijani. It can also be found in Chinese cuisine, braised (紅燒茄子), stewed (魚香茄子), steamed (凉拌茄子), or stuffed (釀茄子).</p> <p>As a native plant, it is widely used in Indian cuisine, for example in sambhar, dalma (a dal preparation with vegetables, native to Orissa), chutney, curry, and achaar. Owing to its versatile nature and wide use in both everyday and festive Indian food, it is often described (under the name brinjal) as the "king of vegetables". In one dish[which?], brinjal is stuffed with ground coconut, peanuts, and masala, and then cooked in oil.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>In tropical and subtropical climates, eggplant can be sown directly into the garden. Eggplant grown in temperate climates fares better when transplanted into the garden after all danger of frost is passed. Seeds are typically started eight to 10 weeks prior to the anticipated frost-free date.</p> <p>Many pests and diseases which afflict other solanaceous plants, such as tomato, pepper (capsicum), and potato, are also troublesome to eggplants. For this reason, it should not be planted in areas previously occupied by its close relatives. Four years should separate successive crops of eggplants. Common North American pests include the potato beetles, flea beetles, aphids, and spider mites. (Adults can be removed by hand, though flea beetles can be especially difficult to control.) Good sanitation and crop rotation practices are extremely important for controlling fungal disease, the most serious of which is Verticillium.</p> <p>Spacing should be 45 cm (18 in.) to 60 cm (24 in.) between plants, depending on cultivar, and 60 cm to 90 cm (24 to 36 in.) between rows, depending on the type of cultivation equipment being used. Mulching will help conserve moisture and prevent weeds and fungal diseases. The flowers are relatively unattractive to bees and the first blossoms often do not set fruit. Hand pollination will improve the set of the first blossoms. Fruits are typically cut from the vine just above the calyx owing to the somewhat woody stems. Flowers are complete, containing both female and male structures, and may be self-pollinated or cross-pollinated.</p> <div> <p><em><strong>Health properties</strong></em></p> </div> <table cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Eggplant, raw</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Energy</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>102 kJ (24 kcal)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Carbohydrates</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>5.7 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>- </strong><strong>Sugars</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>2.35 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>- </strong><strong>Dietary fiber</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>3.4 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Fat</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.19 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span><strong>Protein</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>1.01 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Thiamine (vit. B<sub>1</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.039 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Riboflavin (vit. B<sub>2</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.037 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Niacin (vit. B<sub>3</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.649 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Pantothenic acid (B<sub>5</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.281 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Vitamin B<sub>6</sub></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.084 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Folate (vit. B<sub>9</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>22 μg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Vitamin C</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>2.2 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Calcium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>9 mg (1%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Iron</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.24 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Magnesium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>14 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Manganese</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.25 mg (12%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Phosphorus</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>25 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Potassium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>230 mg (5%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span>Zinc</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.16 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span>Percentages are relative to</span><br /><span>US recommendations for adults.</span><br /><span>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p>A 1998 study at the Institute of Biology of São Paulo State University, Brazil, found eggplant juice to significantly reduce weight, plasma cholesterol levels, and aortic cholesterol content in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.<sup>[13]</sup></p> <p>The results of a 2000 study on humans suggested <em>S. melongena</em> infusion had a modest and transitory effect, no different from diet and exercise.<sup>[14]</sup></p> <p>A 2004 study on humans at the Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo found no effects at all and did not recommend eggplant as an alternative to statins.<sup>[15]</sup></p> <p>The nicotine content of aubergines, though low in absolute terms, is higher than any other edible plant, with a concentration of 0.01 mg per 100 g. The amount of nicotine consumed by eating eggplant or any other food is negligible compared to being in the presence of a smoker.<sup>[16]</sup> On average, 9 kg (20 lbs) of eggplant contains about the same amount of nicotine as a cigarette.</p> <div> <p><em><strong>Allergies</strong></em></p> </div> <p>Case reports of itchy skin or mouth, mild headache, and stomach upset after handling or eating eggplant have been reported anecdotally and published in medical journals (see also oral allergy syndrome). A 2008 study of a sample of 741 people in India, where eggplant is commonly consumed, found nearly 10% reported some allergic symptoms after consuming eggplant, while 1.4% showed symptoms within less than two hours.<sup>[17]</sup> Contact dermatitis from eggplant leaves<sup>[18]</sup> and allergy to eggplant flower pollen<sup>[19]</sup> have also been reported. Individuals who are atopic(genetically predisposed to developing certain allergic hypersensitivity reactions) are more likely to have a reaction to eggplant, which may be because eggplant is high in histamines. A few proteins and at least one secondary metabolite have been identified as potential allergens.<sup>[20]</sup> Cooking eggplant thoroughly seems to preclude reactions in some individuals, but at least one of the allergenic proteins survives the cooking process.</p>
P 294
Ronde De Valence Eggplant Seeds  - 4
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Разнообразие из Греции
Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI  - 4

Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI

Ціна 3,40 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Many people complain that eggplants are bitter, well guess what? The Greek variety Tsakoniki is not, it is actually mild, almost sweet. This eggplant is from the town of Leonidio in Peloponissos, it is long with white stripes and it has PDO status, which means that it must come from Leonidio to be called Tsakoniki.</p> <p>When eggplant season comes around there are all sorts of traditional Greek recipes to choose from.</p> <p>The eggplant is a decadent vegetable; when cooked it literally melts in your mouth and caramelizes giving it a sweet taste. Although Greeks have plenty of eggplant recipes, the Mediterranean in general is known for its love of eggplants and there is an abundance of  traditional recipes to choose from.</p> <p>Nutritionally, eggplants are a fantastic vegetable to include in your diet, here’s why: Eggplants are a source of soluble fiber, this type of fiber slows down the emptying of your stomach making you feel full longer and that can help you eat less if your are trying to lose weight. But one of the most important functions is that this fiber may lower the levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol in your blood.</p> <p>Eggplants also contain several substances that can protect from chronic disease. One of them is chlorogenic acid, don’t worry about pronouncing it correctly, all you need to know is that this substance is an antioxidant and it appears to control blood sugar levels. Anthocyanin is another a substance present in these vegetables, it is responsible for the purple color and it also has antioxidant properties, studies show that it may offer protection from cancer.</p>
P 290
Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI  - 4
  • Новий
White Eggplant Seeds 1.85 - 1

White Eggplant Seeds

Ціна 1,85 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;color:#000000;"><strong><em>WHITE EGGPLANT SEEDS</em></strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>White skinned eggplant that produces early!  Produces 25 – 30 cm long , pearly-white fruits with flesh that is delicate and sweet, without bitterness, with succulent mushroom-like flavor. With white flesh, this eggplant variety can grow anywhere in the World.</p> <p> </p> <p>Product Details</p> <p>Breed: Heirloom</p> <p>Zones: 3-9</p> <p>Germination: 8-10 days</p> <p>Days to Maturity: 70 days</p> <p>Head Size: 25 – 30 cm</p> <p>Head Color: White</p> <p>Fruit Weight: 350 – 400 g</p>
P 287
White Eggplant Seeds 1.85 - 1
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Aubergine – Eggplant Seeds Rosa Bianca Seeds Gallery - 4

Aubergine – Eggplant Seeds...

Ціна 1,85 €
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Aubergine – Eggplant Seeds “Rosa Bianca“ </span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>80 days. Colorful, light pink-lavender fruit with white shading. Rich, mild flesh is very popular with chefs and gardeners alike! no bitterness. A great variety for heirloom market growers. Use the color that sells!</p> </div>
P 143
Aubergine – Eggplant Seeds Rosa Bianca Seeds Gallery - 4
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Разнообразие из Сербии
Medium Long Eggplant Seeds  - 2

Medium Long Eggplant Seeds

Ціна 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Medium Long Eggplant Seeds Domestic (Aubergine)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 200 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h2> <div>Early medium maturing variety, tolerant to heat and humidity, vigorous growth, strong diseases resistance, long harvest period, long straight fruit, beautiful shape, glossy purple skin, good quality, extremly high yield, each fruit is about 28-35 cm in length, 4.5-6 cm in diameter, 250-400g in weight.</div> <div>The eggplant, brinjal eggplant, aubergine, melongene, brinjal or guinea squash (Solanum melongena) is a plant of the family Solanaceae (also known as the nightshades) and genus Solanum. It bears a fruit of the same name, commonly used in cooking. As a nightshade, it is closely related to the tomato and potato. It was domesticated in India from Solanum incanum.</div> <div>It is a delicate perennial often cultivated as an annual. It grows 40 to 150 cm (16 to 57 in) tall, with large, coarsely lobed leaves that are 10 to 20 cm (4–8 in) long and 5 to 10 cm (2–4 in) broad. Semiwild types can grow much larger, to 225 cm (7 ft) with large leaves over 30 cm (12 in) long and 15 cm (6 in) broad. The stem is often spiny. The flower is white to purple, with a five-lobed corolla and yellow stamens. The fruit is fleshy, has a meaty texture. It is less than 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter on wild plants, but much larger in cultivated forms.</div> <div>The fruit is botanically classified as a berry and contains numerous small, soft seeds which are edible, but have a bitter taste because they contain nicotinoid alkaloids; this is unsurprising as it is a close relative of tobacco.</div> <div>History</div> <div>The plant is native to the Indian Subcontinent.[1][2] It has been cultivated in southern and eastern Asia since prehistory,[citation needed] but appears to have become known to the Western world no earlier than circa 1500. The first known written record of the plant is found in Qí mín yào shù, an ancient Chinese agricultural treatise completed in 544.[4] The numerous Arabic and North African names for it, along with the lack of the ancient Greek and Roman names, indicate it was introduced throughout the Mediterranean area by the Arabs in the early Middle Ages. The specific name melongena is derived from a 16th-century Arabic term for one variety.</div> <div>The name "aubergine" is from the French, a diminutive of auberge, a variant of alberge, ‘a kind of peach’ or from the Spanish alberchigo or alverchiga, ‘an apricocke’.[5] It may be also be derived from Catalan albergínia, from Arabic al-baðinjān from Persian bâdenjân, from Sanskrit vātiga-gama).</div> <div>Aubergine is also the name of the purple color resembling that of the fruit,[5] and is a commonly known color scheme[6] applied to articles as diverse as cloth or bathroom suites.</div> <div>The popular name "eggplant" is used in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. It derives from the fruits of some 18th-century European cultivars which were yellow or white and resembled goose or hen's eggs.[7] In Indian native languages Hindi and Urdu, it is called "Baingan"or"Baigan".[8]</div> <div>In Indian, South African, Malaysian and Singaporean English, the fruit is called baigan brinjal, being derived directly from the Portuguese beringela. A less common British English word is melongene, which is also from French (derived) from Italian melanzana from Greek μελιτζάνα. In the Caribbean Trinidad, it also goes by meloongen from melongene.</div> <div>Because of the plant's relationship with the Solanaceae (nightshade) family, the fruit was at one time believed to be extremely poisonous. The flowers and leaves, though, can be poisonous if consumed in large quantities, due to the presence of solanine.[9]</div> <div>Cooking  </div> <div>The raw fruit can have a somewhat bitter taste, but becomes tender when cooked and develops a rich, complex flavor. Many recipes advise salting, rinsing and draining of the sliced fruit (known as "degorging"), to soften it and to reduce the amount of fat absorbed during cooking, but mainly to remove the bitterness of the earlier cultivars. Some modern varieties - including large, purple varieties commonly imported into western Europe - do not need this treatment. The fruit is capable of absorbing large amounts of cooking fats and sauces, making for very rich dishes, but salting reduces the amount of oil absorbed. The fruit flesh is smooth; as in the related tomato, the numerous seeds are soft and edible along with the rest of the fruit. The thin skin is also edible.</div> <div>The plant is used in the cuisine of many countries. It is often stewed, as in the French ratatouille, or deep fried as in the Italian parmigiana di melanzane, the Turkish karnıyarık or Turkish and Greek musakka/moussaka, and Middle-Eastern and South Asian dishes. Eggplants can also be battered before deep-frying and served with a sauce made of tahini and tamarind. In Iranian cuisine, it can be blended with whey as kashk e-bademjan, tomatoes as mirza ghasemi or made into stew as khoresh-e-bademjan. It can be sliced and deep-fried, then served with plain yogurt, (optionally) topped with a tomato and garlic sauce, such as in the Turkish dish patlıcan kızartması (meaning: fried aubergines) or without yogurt as in patlıcan şakşuka. Perhaps the best-known Turkish eggplant dishes are İmam bayıldı (vegetarian) and Karnıyarık (with minced meat).</div> <div>It may also be roasted in its skin until charred, so the pulp can be removed and blended with other ingredients, such as lemon, tahini, and garlic, as in the Middle Eastern baba ghanoush and the similar Greek melitzanosalata. Grilled, mashed and mixed with onions, tomatoes and spices make the Indian and Pakistani dish baingan ka Bhartha or gojju, similar to salată de vinete in Romania, while a mix of roasted eggplant, roasted red peppers, chopped onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, carrots, celery and spices is called zacuscă in Romania or ajvar in Croatia and the Balkans. A simpler version of the dish, baigan-pora (eggplant-charred or burnt), is very popular in the east Indian states of Orissa and Bengal, and Bangladesh where the pulp of vegetable is mixed with raw chopped onions, green chillies, salt and mustard oil. Sometimes fried whole tomatoes and burnt potatoes are also added which is called baigan bharta. A Spanish dish called escalivada calls for strips of roasted aubergine, sweet pepper, onion and tomato. In Spain, is typical to find eggplant as berenjenas de Almagro. There, eggplants are also cooked with vinegar, red peppers, paprika and olive oil.</div> <div>The fruit can also be hollowed out and stuffed with meat, rice, or other fillings, and then baked. In the Caucasus, for example, it is fried and stuffed with walnut paste to make nigvziani badrijani. It can also be found in Chinese cuisine, braised (紅燒茄子), stewed (魚香茄子), steamed (凉拌茄子), or stuffed (釀茄子).</div> <div>As a native plant, it is widely used in Indian cuisine, for example in sambhar, dalma (a dal preparation with vegetables, native to Orissa), chutney, curry, and achaar. Owing to its versatile nature and wide use in both everyday and festive Indian food, it is often described (under the name brinjal) as the "king of vegetables". In one dish[which?], brinjal is stuffed with ground coconut, peanuts, and masala, and then cooked in oil.</div> <div>Cultivation</div> <div>In tropical and subtropical climates, eggplant can be sown directly into the garden. Eggplant grown in temperate climates fares better when transplanted into the garden after all danger of frost is passed. Seeds are typically started eight to 10 weeks prior to the anticipated frost-free date.</div> <div>Many pests and diseases which afflict other solanaceous plants, such as tomato, pepper (capsicum), and potato, are also troublesome to eggplants. For this reason, it should not be planted in areas previously occupied by its close relatives. Four years should separate successive crops of eggplants. Common North American pests include the potato beetles, flea beetles, aphids, and spider mites. (Adults can be removed by hand, though flea beetles can be especially difficult to control.) Good sanitation and crop rotation practices are extremely important for controlling fungal disease, the most serious of which is Verticillium.</div> <div>Spacing should be 45 cm (18 in.) to 60 cm (24 in.) between plants, depending on cultivar, and 60 cm to 90 cm (24 to 36 in.) between rows, depending on the type of cultivation equipment being used. Mulching will help conserve moisture and prevent weeds and fungal diseases. The flowers are relatively unattractive to bees and the first blossoms often do not set fruit. Hand pollination will improve the set of the first blossoms. Fruits are typically cut from the vine just above the calyx owing to the somewhat woody stems. Flowers are complete, containing both female and male structures, and may be self-pollinated or cross-pollinated.</div> <div> <p><em><strong>Health properties</strong></em></p> </div> <table cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Eggplant, raw</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Energy</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">102 kJ (24 kcal)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Carbohydrates</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">5.7 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>- </strong><strong>Sugars</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">2.35 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>- </strong><strong>Dietary fiber</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">3.4 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Fat</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.19 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Protein</strong><strong></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">1.01 g</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Thiamine (vit. B<sub>1</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.039 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Riboflavin (vit. B<sub>2</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.037 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Niacin (vit. B<sub>3</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.649 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Pantothenic acid (B<sub>5</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.281 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Vitamin B<sub>6</sub></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.084 mg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Folate (vit. B<sub>9</sub>)</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">22 μg (6%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Vitamin C</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">2.2 mg (3%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Calcium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">9 mg (1%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Iron</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.24 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Magnesium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">14 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Manganese</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.25 mg (12%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Phosphorus</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">25 mg (4%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Potassium</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">230 mg (5%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Zinc</span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.16 mg (2%)</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Percentages are relative to</span><br /><span style="color:#008000;">US recommendations for adults.</span><br /><span style="color:#008000;">Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p>A 1998 study at the Institute of Biology of São Paulo State University, Brazil, found eggplant juice to significantly reduce weight, plasma cholesterol levels, and aortic cholesterol content in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.<sup>[13]</sup></p> <p>The results of a 2000 study on humans suggested <em>S. melongena</em> infusion had a modest and transitory effect, no different from diet and exercise.<sup>[14]</sup></p> <p>A 2004 study on humans at the Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo found no effects at all and did not recommend eggplant as an alternative to statins.<sup>[15]</sup></p> <p>The nicotine content of aubergines, though low in absolute terms, is higher than any other edible plant, with a concentration of 0.01 mg per 100 g. The amount of nicotine consumed by eating eggplant or any other food is negligible compared to being in the presence of a smoker.<sup>[16]</sup> On average, 9 kg (20 lbs) of eggplant contains about the same amount of nicotine as a cigarette.</p> <div> <p><em><strong>Allergies</strong></em></p> </div> <p>Case reports of itchy skin or mouth, mild headache, and stomach upset after handling or eating eggplant have been reported anecdotally and published in medical journals (see also oral allergy syndrome). A 2008 study of a sample of 741 people in India, where eggplant is commonly consumed, found nearly 10% reported some allergic symptoms after consuming eggplant, while 1.4% showed symptoms within less than two hours.<sup>[17]</sup> Contact dermatitis from eggplant leaves<sup>[18]</sup> and allergy to eggplant flower pollen<sup>[19]</sup> have also been reported. Individuals who are atopic(genetically predisposed to developing certain allergic hypersensitivity reactions) are more likely to have a reaction to eggplant, which may be because eggplant is high in histamines. A few proteins and at least one secondary metabolite have been identified as potential allergens.<sup>[20]</sup> Cooking eggplant thoroughly seems to preclude reactions in some individuals, but at least one of the allergenic proteins survives the cooking process.</p>
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Medium Long Eggplant Seeds  - 2
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STRIPED TOGA Eggplant Seeds Heirloom Aubergine 2.25 - 4

STRIPED TOGA Eggplant Seeds...

Ціна 2,25 €
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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>STRIPED TOGA Eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Not only beautiful, it is delicious also! Eggplant heirloom variety, the plants are high yielding, the oval shaped fruits grow in small clusters together, fruit size is about fruits 7.5cm long x 2.5cm. The fruit start green with darker green stripes later turning yellow and beautiful glossy orange with green stripes. Highly decorative for flower arrangements and fruit plates. The small fruits are edible. Plant high 1-1.20m</p> <h2>Current Facts</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants, botanically classified as Solanum aethiopicum, are a rare heirloom variety belonging to the Solanaceae, or nightshade family, which contains 3,000 species including tomatoes, peppers, and potatoes. Also known as Striped Toga eggplants, Toga eggplants are mostly used as an ornamental in home gardens. Toga eggplants can be left hanging on the stems and used in fresh or dry floral arrangements where they will last for several months.</span></p> <h2>Nutritional Value</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants contain small amounts of protein, starch, and minerals like calcium, iron, and potassium. </span></p> <h2>Applications</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants are best suited for cooked applications such as grilling, frying, and sautéing. They are popularly sautéed and used alongside other vegetables in stews as their flavor alone can be bitter. Toga eggplants retain their color when fried and can add an attractive dash of color to dishes. They can also be grilled on skewers and served as a side dish or incorporated into curries for added crunch. Toga eggplants pair well with tomatoes, peppers, feta, garlic, onions, and meats such as chicken or pork. Toga eggplants will keep up to a week when stored whole in the refrigerator. </span></p> <h2>Ethnic/Cultural Info</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants are thought to have been created from African varieties of eggplant. Eggplants in Africa are used as a staple cooking ingredient and are sometimes dried in rural areas that struggle with access to electricity and refrigeration. In Ghana, eggplants are among the most-consumed vegetable and are commonly eaten raw or used in stews. </span></p> <h2>Geography/History</h2> <p><span>Toga eggplants are believed to have originated in sub-Saharan Africa and were brought to Europe via the slave trade where they are commercially produced today. Toga eggplants can be found at specialty grocers and farmers markets in Europe, Africa, South America, and the United States. </span></p> </body> </html>
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STRIPED TOGA Eggplant Seeds Heirloom Aubergine 2.25 - 4
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