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Hlízy rostlin

Počet produktů: 23

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Variety from Greece

Saffron Seeds (Saffron crocus)

Saffron Bulbs (Saffron crocus)

Cena 3,75 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Saffron Bulbs (Saffron crocus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 bulb.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Crocus sativus, commonly known as saffron crocus, or autumn crocus,[2] is a species of flowering plant of the Crocus genus in the Iridaceae family. It is best known for producing the spice saffron from the filaments that grow inside the flower. The term "autumn crocus" is also mistakenly used for flowers in the Colchicum species. However, crocuses have 3 stamens and 1 style, while colchicum have 6 stamens and 3 styles and are toxic.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">This cormous autumn-flowering perennial plant species is unknown in the wild.[2] Human cultivation of saffron crocus and use of saffron have taken place for more than 3,500 years and spans different cultures, continents, and civilizations, see history of saffron. Crocus sativus is currently known to grow in the Mediterranean, East Asia, and Irano-Turanian Region.[4] Saffron may be the triploid form of a species found in Eastern Greece, Crocus cartwrightianus; it probably appeared first in Crete. An origin in Western or Central Asia, although often suspected, is not supported by botanical research.[5] Other sources suggest some genetic input from Crocus pallasii.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Morphology</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Crocus sativus has a corm, which holds leaves, bracts, bracteole, and the flowering stalk.[4] These are protected by the corm underground. C. sativus generally blooms with purple flowers in the autumn. The plant grows about 10 to 30 cm high.[7] C. sativus is a triploid with 24 chromosomes, which means it has three times the haploid number of chromosomes. This makes the plant sterile due to its inability to pair chromosomes during meiosis.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Cultivation</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Crocus sativus is unknown in the wild, and its ancestor is unknown. The species Crocus cartwrightianus is the most probable ancestor,[9][6] but C. thomassi and C. pallasii are still being considered as potential predecessors.[10] Manual vegetative multiplication is necessary to produce offspring for this species as the plant itself is a triploid that is self-incompatible and male sterile, therefore rendering it incapable of sexual reproduction. This inability to reproduce on its own supports the hypothesis that C. sativus is a mutant descending from C. carthwrightianus as a result of selective breeding.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Corms of Crocus sativus should be planted 4 inches apart and in a trough 4 inches deep. The flower grows best in areas of full sun in well-drained soil with moderate levels of organic content.[11] The corms will multiply after each year, and will last 3–5 years.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Use</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron is considered to be the most valuable spice by weight.  <strong>See spice</strong>. Depending on the size of harvested stigmas, 50,000–75,000 Crocus sativus plants are needed to produce about 1 pound of saffron;[13] each flower only produces three stigmas. Stigmas should be harvested mid-morning when the flowers are fully opened.[12] The saffron crocus (Crocus sativus) should not be confused with "meadow" saffron or autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale) which is poisonous.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Spice</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron (pronounced /ˈsæfrən/ or /ˈsæfrɒn/)[1] is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the "saffron crocus". The vivid crimson stigmas and styles, called threads, are collected and dried to be used mainly as a seasoning and colouring agent in food. Saffron, long among the world's most costly spices by weight,[2][3][4] was probably first cultivated in or near Greece.[5] C. sativus is probably a form of C. cartwrightianus, that emerged by human cultivators selectively breeding plants for unusually long stigmas in late Bronze Age Crete.[6] It slowly propagated throughout much of Eurasia and was later brought to parts of North Africa, North America, and Oceania.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron's taste and iodoform or hay-like fragrance result from the chemicals picrocrocin and safranal.[7][8] It also contains a carotenoid pigment, crocin, which imparts a rich golden-yellow hue to dishes and textiles. Its recorded history is attested in a 7th-century BC Assyrian botanical treatise compiled under Ashurbanipal,[9] and it has been traded and used for over four millennia. Iran now accounts for approximately 90% of the world production of saffron.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The domesticated saffron crocus, Crocus sativus, is an autumn-flowering perennial plant unknown in the wild. It probably descends from the eastern Mediterranean autumn-flowering Crocus cartwrightianus,[12][13] which is also known as "wild saffron"[14] and originated in Crete[15] or mainland Greece.[8] An origin in Southwest Asia,[3][16] although often suspected, has been disapproved by botanical research.[17] The saffron crocus probably resulted when C. cartwrightianus was subjected to extensive artificial selection by growers seeking longer stigmas. C. thomasii and C. pallasii are other possible sources.[13][18] As a genetically monomorphic clone,[15] it slowly propagated throughout much of Eurasia.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">It is a sterile triploid form, which means that three homologous sets of chromosomes compose each specimen's genetic complement; C. sativus bears eight chromosomal bodies per set, making for 24 in total.[19] Being sterile, the purple flowers of C. sativus fail to produce viable seeds; reproduction hinges on human assistance: clusters of corms, underground, bulb-like, starch-storing organs, must be dug up, divided, and replanted. A corm survives for one season, producing via this vegetative division up to ten "cormlets" that can grow into new plants in the next season.[12] The compact corms are small, brown globules that can measure as large as 5 cm (2 in) in diameter, have a flat base, and are shrouded in a dense mat of parallel fibres; this coat is referred to as the "corm tunic". Corms also bear vertical fibres, thin and net-like, that grow up to 5 cm (2 in) above the plant's neck.[19]</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The plant sprouts 5–11 white and non-photosynthetic leaves known as cataphylls. These membrane-like structures cover and protect the crocus's 5 to 11 true leaves as they bud and develop. The latter are thin, straight, and blade-like green foliage leaves, which are 1–3 mm (0.04–0.12 in), in diameter, which either expand after the flowers have opened ("hysteranthous") or do so simultaneously with their blooming ("synanthous"). C. sativus cataphylls are suspected by some to manifest prior to blooming when the plant is irrigated relatively early in the growing season. Its floral axes, or flower-bearing structures, bear bracteoles, or specialised leaves, that sprout from the flower stems; the latter are known as pedicels.[19] After aestivating in spring, the plant sends up its true leaves, each up to 40 cm (16 in) in length. Only in October, after most other flowering plants have released their seeds, do its brilliantly hued flowers develop; they range from a light pastel shade of lilac to a darker and more striated mauve.[20] The flowers possess a sweet, honey-like fragrance. Upon flowering, the plants are 20–30 cm (8–12 in) in height and bear up to four flowers. A three-pronged style 25–30 mm (1.0–1.2 in) in length, emerges from each flower. Each prong terminates with a vivid crimson stigma, which are the distal end of a carpel.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Cultivation</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The saffron crocus, unknown in the wild, probably descends from Crocus cartwrightianus. It is a triploid that is "self-incompatible" and male sterile; it undergoes aberrant meiosis and is hence incapable of independent sexual reproduction—all propagation is by vegetative multiplication via manual "divide-and-set" of a starter clone or by interspecific hybridisation.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Crocus sativus thrives in the Mediterranean maquis, an ecotype superficially resembling the North American chaparral, and similar climates where hot and dry summer breezes sweep semi-arid lands. It can nonetheless survive cold winters, tolerating frosts as low as −10 °C (14 °F) and short periods of snow cover.[12][22] Irrigation is required if grown outside of moist environments such as Kashmir, where annual rainfall averages 1,000–1,500 mm (39–59 in); saffron-growing regions in Greece (500 mm or 20 in annually) and Spain (400 mm or 16 in) are far drier than the main cultivating Iranian regions. What makes this possible is the timing of the local wet seasons; generous spring rains and drier summers are optimal. Rain immediately preceding flowering boosts saffron yields; rainy or cold weather during flowering promotes disease and reduces yields. Persistently damp and hot conditions harm the crops,[23] and rabbits, rats, and birds cause damage by digging up corms. Nematodes, leaf rusts, and corm rot pose other threats. Yet Bacillus subtilis inoculation may provide some benefit to growers by speeding corm growth and increasing stigma biomass yield.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">The plants fare poorly in shady conditions; they grow best in full sunlight. Fields that slope towards the sunlight are optimal (i.e., south-sloping in the Northern Hemisphere). Planting is mostly done in June in the Northern Hemisphere, where corms are lodged 7–15 cm (3–6 in) deep; its roots, stems, and leaves can develop between October and February.[19] Planting depth and corm spacing, in concert with climate, are critical factors in determining yields. Mother corms planted deeper yield higher-quality saffron, though form fewer flower buds and daughter corms. Italian growers optimise thread yield by planting 15 cm (6 in) deep and in rows 2–3 cm (0.8–1.2 in) apart; depths of 8–10 cm (3–4 in) optimise flower and corm production. Greek, Moroccan, and Spanish growers employ distinct depths and spacings that suit their locales.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">C. sativus prefers friable, loose, low-density, well-watered, and well-drained clay-calcareous soils with high organic content. Traditional raised beds promote good drainage. Soil organic content was historically boosted via application of some 20–30 tonnes (20–30 long tons; 22–33 short tons) of manure per hectare. Afterwards, and with no further manure application, corms were planted.[25] After a period of dormancy through the summer, the corms send up their narrow leaves and begin to bud in early autumn. Only in mid-autumn do they flower. Harvests are by necessity a speedy affair: after blossoming at dawn, flowers quickly wilt as the day passes.[26] All plants bloom within a window of one or two weeks.[27] Stigmas are dried quickly upon extraction and (preferably) sealed in airtight containers.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">One freshly picked flower yields an average 30 mg (0.0011 oz) of fresh saffron or 7 mg (0.00025 oz) dried; roughly 150 flowers yield 1 g (0.035 oz) of dry saffron threads; to produce 12 g (0.42 oz) of dried saffron, 1 kg (2.2 lb) of flowers are needed; 1 lb (0.45 kg) yields 0.2 oz (5.7 g) of dried saffron.[25] To glean 1 lb (450 g) of dry saffron requires the harvest of 50,000–75,000 flowers; a kilogram requires 110,000–170,000 flowers.[29][30] Forty hours of labour are needed to pick 150,000 flowers.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Trade</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Almost all saffron grows in a belt from Spain in the west to India in the east. The other continents, except Antarctica, produce smaller amounts. In 2014, 250 t (250,000 kg) were produced worldwide.[47] Iran is responsible for around 90–93% of global production, and much of their produce is exported.[10] A few of Iran's drier eastern and southeastern provinces, including Fars, Kerman, and those in the Khorasan region, glean the bulk of modern global production. In 2005, second-ranked Greece produced 5.7 t (5,700 kg), while Morocco (the Berber region of Taliouine), and India (Kashmir), tied for third rank, each producing 2.3 t (2,300 kg).</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">In recent years, Afghan cultivation has risen. Azerbaijan, Morocco, and Italy are, in decreasing order, lesser producers. Prohibitively high labour costs and abundant Iranian imports mean that only select locales continue the tedious harvest in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland—among them the Swiss village of Mund, whose annual output is a few kilograms.[8] Microscale production of saffron can be found in Australia (mainly the state of Tasmania),[48] China, Egypt, parts of England[49] France, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Sweden (Gotland), Turkey (mainly around the town of Safranbolu), the United States (California and Pennsylvania), and Central Africa.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron prices at wholesale and retail rates range from US$500 to US$5,000 per pound, or US$1,100–11,000/kg. In Western countries, the average retail price in 1974 was $1,000 per pound or US$2,200 per kilogram.[3] In February 2013, a retail bottle containing 0.06 ounces could be purchased for $16.26 or the equivalent of $4,336 per pound or as little as about $2,000/pound in larger quantities. A pound contains between 70,000 and 200,000 threads. Vivid crimson coloring, slight moistness, elasticity, and lack of broken-off thread debris are all traits of fresh saffron.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Uses</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron's aroma is often described by connoisseurs as reminiscent of metallic honey with grassy or hay-like notes, while its taste has also been noted as hay-like and sweet. Saffron also contributes a luminous yellow-orange colouring to foods. Saffron is widely used in Persian,[50] Indian, European, and Arab cuisines. Confectioneries and liquors also often include saffron. Saffron is used in dishes ranging from the jewelled rice and khoresh of Iran, [51][52] the Milanese risotto of Italy, the paella of Spain, the bouillabaisse of France, to the biryani with various meat accompaniments in South Asia. One of the most esteemed use for saffron is in the preparation of the Golden Ham, a precious dry-cured ham made with saffron from San Gimignano. Common saffron substitutes include safflower (Carthamus tinctorius, which is often sold as "Portuguese saffron" or "açafrão"), annatto, and turmeric (Curcuma longa).</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Saffron has a long history of use in traditional medicine.[53][54] Saffron has also been used as a fabric dye, particularly in China and India, and in perfumery.[55] It is used for religious purposes in India.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><strong>Nutrition</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">Dried saffron is composed of 12% water, 65% carbohydrates, 6% fat and 11% protein (table).</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">In comparison to other spices or dried foods, the nutrient content of dried saffron shows richness of nutritional value across B vitamins and dietary minerals (table). In a serving of one tablespoon (2 grams), manganese is present as 28% of the Daily Value while other nutrients are negligible (table).</span></p> </body> </html>
MHS 105 B
Saffron Seeds (Saffron crocus)
  • Nové
Black Garlic Cloves - Black Gold (Allium roseum)

Black Garlic Cloves (Allium...

Cena 2,25 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Black Garlic Cloves - Black Gold (Allium roseum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 Cloves.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Just like each tomato is not suitable for making sauces, so each of the garlic is not suitable for fermenting and making a Black Garlic. We offer you a variety that came directly from Japan and the only variety (Pink Garlic Allium roseum) from which a real Black Garlic is made.</span></p> <p><span>Black garlic is a type of "caramelized" garlic (in reality, browned by the Maillard reaction rather than truly caramelized) first used as a food ingredient in Asian cuisine. It is made by heating whole bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) over the course of several weeks, a process that results in black cloves. The taste is sweet and syrupy with hints of balsamic vinegar[1] or tamarind.[2] Black garlic's popularity has spread to the United States as it has become a sought-after ingredient used in high-end cuisine.</span></p> <p><span>The process of producing black garlic is sometimes incorrectly referred to as fermentation, but it does not in fact involve microbial action.[3] Black garlic is made when heads of garlic are aged under specialized conditions of heat and humidity. Bulbs are kept in a humidity-controlled environment at temperatures that range from 60 - 77ºC (140 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit) for 60 to 90 days. There are no additives, preservatives, or burning of any kind. The enzymes that give fresh garlic its sharpness break down. Those conditions also facilitate the Maillard reaction, the chemical process that produces new flavour compounds responsible for the deep taste of seared meat and fried onions, the cloves turn black and develop a sticky date-like texture.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>In Taoist mythology, black garlic was rumored to grant immortality.[citation needed] In Korea, black garlic was developed as a health product and it is still perceived as health supplementary food. </span></p> <p><span>Black garlic is prized as a food rich in antioxidants and added to energy drinks, and in Thailand is claimed to increase the consumer's longevity. It is also used to make black garlic chocolate.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Culinary uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>In black garlic, the garlic flavour is softened such that it almost or entirely disappears depending on the length of time it was heated. Additionally, its flavour is dependent on that of the fresh garlic that was used to make it. Garlic with a higher sugar content produces a milder, more caramel-like flavour, whereas garlic with a low sugar content produces a sharper, somewhat more acidic flavour, similar in character to tomato paste. Burnt flavours may also be present if the garlic was heated for too long at too high a temperature or not long enough: during heating, the garlic turns black in colour well before the full extent of its sweetness is able to develop.</span></p> <p><span>Black garlic can be eaten alone, on bread, or used in soups, sauces, crushed into a mayonnaise or simply tossed into a vegetable dish. A vinaigrette can be made with black garlic, sherry vinegar, soy, a neutral oil, and Dijon mustard. Its softness increases with water content.</span></p> <p><span>Unlike the vegetable from which it is made, white garlic, black garlic has a very subtle and muted flavour that is easily overpowered.</span></p> <p><span>Because of its delicate and muted flavours, a considerably larger amount of black garlic must be used in comparison to white garlic in order to achieve a similar level of intensity. Additionally, black garlic cannot be used in place of white garlic. If a garlic flavour is desired in addition to the flavour of black garlic, then fresh garlic must be added.</span></p> <p><span>One method to release the subtle flavours of black garlic is to knead a peeled clove between the fingers until its structure is thoroughly broken down and then to dissolve the resulting paste in a small amount of hot water. This produces a dark brown, coffee-coloured suspension of the fibrous black garlic particles in a solution that carries most of its flavour, acidity, and sugar content. This liquid may then be added to foods that are otherwise neutral in flavour (like, for example, mashed potatoes) to better showcase the flavour of the black garlic.</span></p> <p><span>Likely owing to its harsh and concentrated colour, the potent reputation of fresh garlic, and the association of Maillard reactions with the browning of meat, it is a common misconception that black garlic has a "meaty" flavour. It does not. It is commonly eaten out of hand by enthusiasts, who sometimes liken the flavour to a savoury, slightly acidic caramel candy or to sweet tamarind fruit. The most prominent flavour it imparts is sweetness when used in high concentrations and when used in low concentrations, provided that there are no other flavours to compete with that of the black garlic, the flavour and aroma are somewhat similar to those of instant coffee, though without any bitterness.</span></p> <p><strong><span>In popular culture</span></strong></p> <p><span>It garnered television attention when it was used in battle redfish on Iron Chef America, episode 11 of season 7 (on Food Network), and in an episode of Top Chef New York (on Bravo),[8] where it was added to a sauce accompanying monkfish.</span></p> <p><span>In the United Kingdom,[6] where it made its TV debut on the BBC's Something for the Weekend cooking and lifestyle program in February 2009,[10] farmer Mark Botwright, owner of the South West Garlic Farm, explained that he developed a process for preserving garlic after finding a 4000-year-old Korean recipe for "black garlic."</span></p> <p><span>In 2011, it was used on an episode of Food Network's Chopped Champions. In September 2011, it was a mandatory ingredient in the final round of the second episode of Ron Ben-Israel's Sweet Genius.</span></p> <p><span>It also was mentioned in the animated series Bob's Burgers in episode "Best Burger", in which Bob enters a best burger contest, but quickly realizes his main ingredient - black garlic - is missing and sends his kids back to the restaurant to retrieve it in time for its preparation and inclusion in the burger.</span></p> <p><strong><span>AFTER YOU BUY THIS PRODUCT WE WILL SEND YOU LINK WITH VIDEO HOW YOU CAN MAKE BLACK GARLIC EASY AT HOME FOR ONLY 10 DAYS!</span></strong></p> </body> </html>
P 416
Black Garlic Cloves - Black Gold (Allium roseum)
  • Nové

Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Helianthus tuberosus)

Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers...

Cena 7,95 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Helianthus tuberosus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 Tubers.</strong></span></h2> <p><i>Helianthus tuberosus</i> is a herbaceous perennial plant growing to 1.5–3 m (4 ft 11 in–9 ft 10 in) tall with opposite leaves on the upper part of the stem but alternate below.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup> The leaves have a rough, hairy texture. Larger leaves on the lower stem are broad ovoid-acute and can be up to 30 cm (12 in) long. Leaves higher on the stem are smaller and narrower.</p> <p>The flowers are yellow and produced in capitate flowerheads, which are 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in) in diameter, with 10–20 ray florets and 60 or more small disc florets.<sup id="cite_ref-lilly_5-1" class="reference">[5]</sup></p> <p>The tubers are elongated and uneven, typically 7.5–10 cm (3.0–3.9 in) long and 3–5 cm (1.2–2.0 in) thick, and vaguely resembling ginger root in appearance, with a crisp texture when raw. They vary in colour from pale brown to white, red, or purple.<sup id="cite_ref-purdue_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-rhs_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Food_use">Food use</span></h2> <p>Before the arrival of Europeans, Native Americans cultivated <i>H. tuberosus</i> as a food source. The tubers persist for years after being planted, so that the species expanded its range from central North America to the eastern and western regions.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (September 2017)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup> Early European colonists learned of this, and sent tubers back to Europe, where it became a popular crop and naturalized there. It later gradually fell into obscurity in North America, but attempts to market it commercially have been successful in the late 1900s and early 2000s.<sup id="cite_ref-lilly_5-2" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>The sunchoke contains about 2% protein, no oil, and little starch. It is rich in the carbohydrate inulin (76%), which is a polymer of the monosaccharide fructose. Tubers stored for any length of time convert their inulin into its component fructose. Jerusalem artichokes have an underlying sweet taste because of the fructose, which is about one and a half times as sweet as sucrose.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-1" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>It has also been reported as a folk remedy for diabetes.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-2" class="reference">[7]</sup> Temperature variances have been shown to affect the amount of inulin the Jerusalem artichoke can produce. When not in tropical regions, it makes less inulin than when it is in a warmer region.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c2/Sunroot_flowers.jpg/220px-Sunroot_flowers.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="165" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Jerusalem artichoke flowers</div> </div> </div> <p>Despite one of its names, the Jerusalem artichoke has no relationship to Jerusalem, and it is not a type of artichoke, though the two are distantly related as members of the daisy family. The origin of the "Jerusalem" part of the name is uncertain. Italian settlers in the United States called the plant <i>girasole</i>, the Italian word for sunflower, because of its familial relationship to the garden sunflower (both plants are members of the genus <i>Helianthus</i>). Over time, the name <i>girasole</i> (pronounced closer to <span title="Representation in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)" class="IPA">[d͡ʒiraˈzu:l]</span> in southern Italian dialects) may have been changed to Jerusalem.<sup id="cite_ref-Smith_1807_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup> In other words, English speakers would have corrupted "girasole artichoke" (meaning, "sunflower artichoke") to Jerusalem artichoke. Another explanation for the name is that the Puritans, when they came to the New World, named the plant with regard to the "New Jerusalem" they believed they were creating in the wilderness.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-3" class="reference">[7]</sup> Also, various other names have been applied to the plant, such as the French or Canada potato, <i>topinambour</i>, and lambchoke. Sunchoke, a name by which it is still known today, was invented in the 1960s by Frieda Caplan, a produce wholesaler who was trying to revive the plant's appeal.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-4" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>The artichoke part of the Jerusalem artichoke's name comes from the taste of its edible tuber. Samuel de Champlain, the French explorer, sent the first samples of the plant to France, noting its taste was similar to that of an artichoke.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup> <sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup></p> <p>The name <i>topinambur</i>, in one account, dates from 1615, when a member of the Brazilian coastal tribe called the Tupinambá visited the Vatican at the same time that a sample of the tuber from Canada was on display there, presented as a critical food source that helped French Canadian settlers survive the winter. The New World connection resulted in the name <i>topinambur</i> being applied to the tuber, the word now used in French, German, Italian, Romanian, Russian, and Spanish.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[12]</sup> <sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="History">History</span></h2> <p>Jerusalem artichokes were first cultivated by the Native Americans long before the arrival of the Europeans; this extensive cultivation obscures the exact native range of the species.<sup id="cite_ref-grin_2-1" class="reference">[2]</sup> The French explorer Samuel de Champlain discovered that the Native people of Nauset Harbor in Massachusetts had cultivated roots that tasted like artichoke. The following year, Champlain returned to the same area to discover that the roots had a flavour similar to chard<sup id="cite_ref-NathalieCooke_14-0" class="reference">[14]</sup> and was responsible for bringing the plant back to France. Some time later, Petrus Hondius, a Dutch botanist planted a shrivelled Jerusalem artichoke tuber in his garden at Terneuzen and was surprised to see the plant proliferate.<sup id="cite_ref-NathalieCooke_14-1" class="reference">[14]</sup> Jerusalem artichokes are so well suited for the European climate and soil that the plant multiplies quickly. By the mid-1600s, the Jerusalem artichoke had become a very common vegetable for human consumption in Europe and the Americas and was also used for livestock feed in Europe and colonial America.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-5" class="reference">[7]</sup> The French in particular were especially fond of the vegetable, which reached its peak popularity at the turn of the 19th century.<sup id="cite_ref-LevetinEstelle_7-6" class="reference">[7]</sup> The Jerusalem artichoke was titled 'best soup vegetable' in the 2002 Nice Festival for the Heritage of the French Cuisine.</p> <p>The French explorer and Acadia’s first historian, Marc Lescarbot, described Jerusalem artichokes as being “as big as turnips or truffles”, suitable for eating and taste "like chards, but more pleasant.” In 1629, English herbalist and botanist, John Parkinson, wrote that the widely grown Jerusalem artichoke had become very common and cheap in London, so much so “that even the most vulgar begin to despise them.” In contrast, when Jerusalem artichokes first arrived in England, the tubers were "dainties for the Queen".<sup id="cite_ref-NathalieCooke_14-2" class="reference">[14]</sup></p> <p>They have also been called the "Canadian truffle". In France, they are associated, along with rutabagas, with the deprivations of the years of Nazi occupation during World War II, where the rationing and scarcity of traditional foods made them a regular part of the French diet until at the end of the war, they returned to their customary role as animal feed.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation_and_use">Cultivation and use</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/45/Sunroot_growing.jpg/220px-Sunroot_growing.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="244" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Young plants in a garden</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e5/Topinambur_H2ase1.jpg/220px-Topinambur_H2ase1.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="165" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Sunroot tubers</div> </div> </div> <p>Unlike most tubers, but in common with many other members of the Asteraceae (including the artichoke), the tubers store their carbohydrate as inulin (not to be confused with insulin) rather than as starch. So, Jerusalem artichoke tubers are an important source of inulin used as a dietary fiber in food manufacturing.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup></p> <p>Crop yields are high, typically 16–20 tonnes/ha for tubers, and 18–28 tonnes/ha green weight for foliage. Jerusalem artichoke also has potential for production of ethanol fuel, using inulin-adapted strains of yeast for fermentation.<sup id="cite_ref-purdue_3-2" class="reference">[3]</sup></p> <p>Jerusalem artichokes are easy to cultivate, which tempts gardeners to simply leave them completely alone to grow. The quality of the edible tubers degrades, however, unless the plants are dug up and replanted in fertile soil. Because even a small piece of tuber will grow if left in the ground, the plant can ruin gardens by smothering or overshadowing nearby plants and can take over huge areas. Farmers growing Jerusalem artichokes who then rotate the crop may have to treat the field with a weedkiller (such as glyphosate) to stop their spread. Each root can make an additional 75 to 200 tubers during a year.</p> <p>The tubers are sometimes used as a substitute for potatoes:<sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference">[17]</sup> they have a similar consistency, and in their raw form have a similar texture, but a sweeter, nuttier flavor; raw and sliced thinly, they are fit for a salad. Their inulin form of carbohydrates give the tubers a tendency to become soft and mushy if boiled, but they retain their texture better when steamed. The inulin cannot be broken down by the human digestive system<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup> but it is metabolized by bacteria in the colon. This can cause flatulence and, in some cases, gastric pain. <i>Gerard's Herbal</i>, printed in 1621, quotes the English botanist John Goodyer on Jerusalem artichokes:<sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup></p> <blockquote class="templatequote"> <p>which way soever they be dressed and eaten, they stir and cause a filthy loathsome stinking wind within the body, thereby causing the belly to be pained and tormented, and are a meat more fit for swine than men.</p> </blockquote> <p>Jerusalem artichokes have 650 mg potassium per 1 cup (150g) serving. They are also high in iron, and contain 10-12% of the US RDA of fiber, niacin, thiamine, phosphorus, and copper.<sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup></p> <p>Jerusalem artichokes can be used as animal feed, but they must be washed before being fed to most animals. Pigs can forage, however, and safely eat them directly from the ground. The stalks and leaves can be harvested and used for silage, though cutting the tops greatly reduces the harvest of the roots.</p> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Jerusalem-artichokes, raw</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>304 kJ (73 kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>17.44 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sugars</th> <td>9.6 g</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>1.6 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>0.01 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>2 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th colspan="2">Vitamins</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine <span>(B<span><span>1</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(17%)</div> 0.2 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin <span>(B<span><span>2</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(5%)</div> 0.06 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin <span>(B<span><span>3</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(9%)</div> 1.3 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid <span>(B<span><span>5</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(8%)</div> 0.397 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span><span>6</span></span></th> <td> <div>(6%)</div> 0.077 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate <span>(B<span><span>9</span></span>)</span></th> <td> <div>(3%)</div> 13 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>(5%)</div> 4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th colspan="2">Minerals</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>(1%)</div> 14 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>(26%)</div> 3.4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>(5%)</div> 17 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>(11%)</div> 78 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>(9%)</div> 429 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr /> <div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg = micrograms • mg = milligrams</li> <li>IU = International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap">Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.<br /><span class="nowrap"><span>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Fermented_products">Fermented products</span></h3> <p>In Baden-Württemberg, Germany, over 90% of the Jerusalem artichoke crop is used to produce a spirit called "Topinambur<span class="noprint"> (de)</span>", "Topi" or "Rossler".<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup> By the end of the 19th-century, Jerusalem artichokes were being used in Baden to make a spirit called "Jerusalem Artichoke Brandy", "Jerusalem Artichoke", "Topi", "Erdäpfler", "Rossler", or "Borbel".</p> <p>Jerusalem artichoke brandy smells fruity and has a slight nutty-sweet flavour. It is characterised by an intense, pleasing, earthy note. The tubers are washed and dried in an oven before being fermented and distilled. It can be further refined to make "Red Rossler" by adding common tormentil, and other ingredients such as currants, to produce a somewhat bitter and astringent decoction. It is used as digestif, as well as a remedy for diarrhoea or abdominal pain.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Marketing_scheme">Marketing scheme</span></h2> <p>In the 1980s, the Jerusalem artichoke also gained some notoriety when its seeds were planted by Midwestern US farmers at the prodding of an agricultural attempt to save the family farm. This effort was an attempt to teach independent farmers to raise their own food, feed, and fuel. Little market existed for the tuber in that part of the US at the time, but contacts were made with sugar producers, oil and gas companies, and the fresh food market for markets to be developed. Fructose had not yet been established as a mainstay, nor was ethanol used as a main fuel additive as it is today. The only real profits then in this effort were realized by a few first-year growers (who sold some of their seed to other farmers individually as well as with the help of the company attempting this venture). As a result, many of the farmers who had planted large quantities of the crop lost money.</p> </body> </html>
P 421
Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Helianthus tuberosus)
  • Nové
Ginger Tubers - Rhizomes (Zingiber officinale) 8.55 - 1

Ginger Tubers - Rhizomes...

Cena 8,55 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Ginger </strong><strong>Tubers - </strong><strong>Rhizomes (Zingiber officinale)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 Tubers.</strong></span></h2> <p>Ginger is a well-known spice produced from the rhizome (underground stem) of the tropical herbaceous plant, Zingiber officinale.</p> <p>Zingiber officinale is best known as the source of the pungent, aromatic spice called ginger. This spice is produced from the rhizome (underground stem) of the plant.</p> <p>Obtained by the Greeks and Romans from Arab traders, it was one of the first oriental spices to arrive in Europe. Other spices in the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) include cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) and turmeric (Curcuma longa).</p> <p>Ginger has many medicinal uses. The fresh or dried rhizome is used in oral or topical preparations to treat a variety of ailments, while the essential oil is applied topically as an analgesic. Evidence suggests ginger is most effective against nausea and vomiting associated with surgery, vertigo, travel sickness and morning sickness. However, the safe use of ginger during pregnancy is questionable and pregnant women should exercise caution before taking it. The topical use of ginger may cause allergic reactions.</p> <p><strong>Synonym: </strong></p> <p>Amomum zingiber L., Zingiber missionis Wall. (for full list see the World Checklist of Selected Plant Families)</p> <p><strong>Genus: </strong></p> <p>Zingiber</p> <p><strong>Geography and distribution</strong></p> <p>Zingiber officinale is possibly native to India. It is widely grown as a commercial crop in south and southeast Asia, tropical Africa (especially Sierra Leone and Nigeria), Latin America, the Caribbean (especially Jamaica) and Australia.</p> <p><strong>Underground parts: </strong></p> <p>Ginger has a distinctive thickened, branched rhizome (underground stem) which sometimes looks somewhat like a swollen hand. The rhizome has a brown corky outer layer (usually removed before use) and a pale yellow centre with a spicy lemon-like scent.</p> <p><strong>Leaves: </strong></p> <p>Shoots (pseudostems), up to 1.2 m tall, arise annually from buds on the rhizome. These pseudostems are formed from a series of leaf bases (sheaths) wrapped tightly around one another with the long (up to 7 cm), narrow (up to 1.9 cm wide), mid-green leaf blades arranged alternately.</p> <p><strong>Flowers: </strong></p> <p>The flowering heads, borne on separate shorter stems, are cone-shaped spikes and composed of a series of greenish to yellowish leaf-like bracts. Protruding just beyond the outer edge of the bracts, the flowers are pale yellow in color with a purplish lip that has yellowish dots and striations. Flowering stems are rarely if ever, produced in cultivated plants.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The aromatic rhizome of Zingiber officinale is the source of ginger, a spice used for centuries to add flavour in cooking. In Asia, the fresh stem is an essential ingredient of many dishes, whereas the dried, powdered spice is more popular in European cooking. Gingerbread, one of the most popular uses for ginger in Britain, dates to Anglo-Saxon times when preserved ginger (produced by boiling the rhizome in sugar syrup) was used, often medicinally.</p> <p>Crystallised ginger, a sweetmeat traditionally eaten as a delicacy at Christmas, is prepared by coating dried, preserved ginger with sugar. Ginger oil, the oleoresin, is used to flavor ginger beer and ginger ale and is commonly used as an ingredient in perfumery, cosmetics, and medicines.</p> <p>The pungent principles in ginger are the non-volatile phenolic compounds gingerol, gingeridioneandshogaol.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Ginger probably originated as part of the ground flora of tropical lowland forests, where many of its wild relatives can still be found. In cultivation it requires hot, humid, shady conditions and grows best in a fertile loam as it needs large quantities of nutrients.</p> <p>Zingiber officinale has been successfully propagated at Kew using internodal cuttings. The cuttings are placed in a shallow pot in a mixture of coir and perlite. The pot is placed in a misting unit (or, if not available, in a closed glass case), which is heated at the base to 20 ˚C. It takes time for any activity to become visible, but eventually, new roots and shoots are produced. It has been noted that this method produces vigorous plants. The traditional technique for propagation of ginger is by division.</p> <p>Mature plants are grown in the behind-the-scenes Tropical Nursery at Kew, in a zone that is kept at a temperature of 18-25 ˚C and at high humidity (70-90 % RH). The plants are watered daily throughout most of the year. In the winter they can be watered less often, as long as they are kept moist. They are fed fortnightly with nitrogen, phosphorus &amp; potassium mix and calcium nitrate.</p> <p>In winter the older pseudostems are removed from the plants, and the new ones allowed to grow up. At this stage, the new pseudostems may need staking, but usually, they are strong enough to support themselves. Occasionally mealy bug and red spider mite cause problems. Where possible these pests are removed by hand.</p> <p><strong>This species at Kew</strong></p> <p>Zingiber officinale can be seen in Kew's Palm House, alongside other plants from Southeast Asia.</p> <p>Various members of the ginger family are grown in the hot moist section of the Princess of Wales Conservatory.</p> <p>Pressed and dried specimens of Zingiber officinale are held in Kew’s Herbarium where they are available to researchers by appointment. The details of one of these specimens can be seen online in Kew’s Herbarium Catalogue.</p> <p>Specimens of ginger are held in Kew’s Economic Botany Collection in the Sir Joseph Banks Building, where they are available to researchers by appointment.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 14 (5 T)
Ginger Tubers - Rhizomes (Zingiber officinale) 8.55 - 1
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Tato rostlina má obrovské plody

Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs 4.5 - 8

Giant leek Allium Sensation...

Cena 4,50 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs</strong></span><br /><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>The price is for package of 3 bulbs.</strong></span></h2> <div><span style="font-size:11pt;">These flowers are absolutely huge! They measure a whopping 6 - 8" wide! This variety of Allium makes an excellent dried flower. They are also a favorite of bees.</span></div> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;"><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Allium giganteum, also known as Giant Onion, is a perennial bulbous plant of the onion genus, used as a flowering garden plant, and growing to 2 metres. It is the tallest ornamental Allium in common cultivation. In early to midsummer, small globes of intense purple flower heads (umbels) appear, followed by attractive seed heads. A popular cultivar, 'Globemaster', is shorter (80 centimetres (31 in)) but produces much bigger, deep violet, flower heads (15–20 centimetres (5.9–7.9 in)). Both varieties have been granted the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">NAME: Giant Allium ‘Globemaster’</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">SCIENTIFIC NAME: Allium Giganteum</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">COLOR: Purple 6 - 8” round flower heads</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT SEEDS: Outdoors after frost / Indoors weeks before last frost</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">BLOOM TIME: Late Spring - Mid Summer</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">HARDINESS ZONE: 4 - 9</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT HEIGHT: 36 - 48”</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT SPACING: 12 - 15”</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">LIGHT REQUIREMENTS: Sun</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">SOIL &amp; WATER PREFERENCES: Average</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Always use sterilized planting soil.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Moisten planting media, place the fine seeds on the soil and cover them lightly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Stratify the seeds by placing the pot in a plastic bag at approx. 5°C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">After 3-4 weeks place the pot to germination temperature, approx. 15°C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Within 1-? months the seeds will germinate, germination can be very slow.</span></p>
F 83 GAB
Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs 4.5 - 8
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Hyacinthus orientalis bulbs (different types) 2 - 6

Hyacinthus orientalis bulbs...

Cena 2,00 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Hyacinthus orientalis bulbs (different types)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 bulb.</strong></span></h2> <p>Hyacinth 'Pink Pearl', Dutch Hyacinth, Hyacinthus orientalis, Common Hyacinth, Spring Bulbs, Spring Flowers</p> <p>Highly fragrant, award winning Hyacinth 'Pink Pearl' features dense spikes of fuchsia-purple  owers edged pale pink. Floating atop erect, lance-shaped bright green leaves, this beauty blooms for 3-4 weeks in mid spring. Plant it where you will be able to enjoy its perfume daily: near a doorway, along a path, near your patio or deck!</p> <p>Hyacinths are extremely popular garden plants. One reason is the genus' wide assortment of ower colors. Another reason is their scent, described as rich or heavy, that is so highly praised by ower and plant enthusiasts. Completing the picture of the perfect bulbous plant, is the fact that hyacinths are very easy to bring into ower. The number of orets on the ower stalk depends on the size of the bulb. Large bulbs can produce</p> <p>60 to 70 orets. For garden planting, however, such bulbs are less suitable because the ower stalks become top-heavy and fall over easily. Sizes 15-16 and 16-17 are best for garden planting. The large sizes, though, are eagerly sought for indoor forcing. Even though hyacinth bulbs are usually used only once, sometimes it is worthwhile to leave them in the ground for a year or two. When they bloom again, their ower clusters may be a bit smaller than in the rst blooming season. To allow for good growing conditions, the plants must be given the opportunity to wither back completely.</p> <p>★  Won the prestigious Award of Garden Merit of the Royal Horticultural Society.</p> <p>★  Rising up to 6-10 inches tall (15-25 cm), this hyacinth will naturalize in the right spot. But it should be noted that owering might decrease in quality over time.</p> <p>★  Thrives in average, medium moisture, well-drained  soils in full sun or part shade. Keep the soil moist during the growing season.</p> <p>★  Easy to grow, this Hyacinth is a welcomed addition to beds, borders, containers, rock gardens or along walks. For best visual impact, plant in groups (at least 5 bulbs) or mixed with any other owering bulbs. Great for forcing!</p> <p>★  Deer and rabbit resistant!</p>
Type - Carnegie
Hyacinthus orientalis bulbs (different types) 2 - 6
  • Nové
Crocus botanical mix -bulbs

Crocus botanical mix - bulbs

Cena 4,50 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-family: helvetica;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Crocus botanical mix - bulbs</span></strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="font-family: helvetica;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt; color: #ff0000;">The price is for package of 3 bulbs.</span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b><strong><span style="font-size: 12pt;">This variety is famous for its delightful fragrance. There's nothing like closing your eyes and breathing in the sweet scent of Spring! </span></strong></b></i></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b>Crocus</b></i> (English plural: crocuses or croci) is a genus of flowering plants in the iris family comprising 90 species of perennials growing from corms. Many are cultivated for their flowers appearing in autumn, winter, or spring. The spice saffron is obtained from the stigmas of <i>Crocus sativus</i>, an autumn-blooming species. Crocuses are native to woodland, scrub, and meadows from sea level to alpine tundra in central and southern Europe, in particular Krokos, Greece<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup>, on the islands of the Aegean, North Africa and the Middle East, and across Central Asia to Xinjiang Province in western China.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">The cup-shaped, solitary, salverform flower tapers off into a narrow tube. Their colors vary enormously, although lilac, mauve, yellow, and white are predominant. The grass-like, ensiform leaf<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference"></sup> shows generally a white central stripe along the leaf axis. The leaf margin is entire.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">A crocus has three stamens, while a similar-looking toxic plant, <i>colchicum</i>, sometimes popularly referred to as "autumn crocus", has six stamens. In addition, crocus have one style, while <i>colchicum</i> have three.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">About 30 of the species are cultivated, including <i>Crocus sativus</i> for saffron production. The varieties cultivated for decoration mainly represent five species: <i>C. vernus</i>, <i>C. chrysanthus</i>, <i>C. flavus</i>, <i>C. sieberi</i>, and <i>C. tommasinianus</i>. Among the first flowers to bloom in spring, crocuses are popular with gardeners. Their flowering time varies from the late winter <i>C. tommasinianus</i> to the later large hybridized and selected Giant "Dutch crocuses" (<i>C. vernus</i>). Crocus flowers and leaves are protected from frost by a waxy cuticle; in areas where snow and frost occasionally occur in the early spring, it is not uncommon to see early flowering crocuses blooming through a light late snowfall.</span></p> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 13pt; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/saffron-bulbs-saffron-crocus.html" target="_blank" title="Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here" style="color: #ff0000;" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here</strong></a></span></h2> </body> </html>
F 81
Crocus botanical mix -bulbs
  • Nové

Horseradish Root / Seedlings Ready For Planting 3.25 - 6

Horseradish Root /...

Cena 3,25 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Horseradish Root / Seedlings Ready For Planting (Armoracia Rusticana)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price is for package with 2, 3, 5 roots / Seedlings.</strong></span></h2> <p>Grow your own horseradish from your own garden (they are also known as thongs).</p> <p>This is an easy plant to grow with a lovely hot tasty reward!</p> <p>Photo is an example of what you will receive, those you do receive will differ in size and shape.</p> <p>Two, Three or Five fresh root sections, ready for planting out - similar but not identical to those pictured.</p> <p>Use Drop Down List To Choose the Quantity YOU Require</p> <p>Our planting roots are approx. a minimum of 8-10cm, they may signs of growth, which may need removing before you plant them as this may have suffered from lifting and postage.</p> <p><strong>Item Supplied</strong>: Fresh root sections ready for planting out - similar but not identical to those pictured - as all roots differ in shape and size.</p> <p>Will grow well in most soil types, if you can't plant straight away it is advisable to place into a pot of compost until you are ready.</p> <p>These will grow equally well when planting in the ground or large container.</p> <p>Our horseradish plantation is grown entirely organically, without any need for herbicides, pesticides or fertilizers of any kind.</p> <p>To ensure top quality stock is sent, we only lift our plants the day of dispatch.</p> <p>These packages usually fit through your letter box.</p> <p>Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage). It is a root vegetable used as a spice.</p> <p>The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is popular worldwide. It grows up to 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root.</p> <p>The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Grated mash should be used immediately or preserved in vinegar for best flavor. Once exposed to air or heat it will begin to lose its pungency, darken in color, and become unpleasantly bitter tasting over time.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Horseradish is probably indigenous to temperate Eastern Europe, where its Slavic name chren seemed to Augustin Pyramus de Candolle more primitive than any Western synonym. Horseradish has been cultivated since antiquity.[6] According to Greek mythology, the Delphic Oracle told Apollo that the horseradish was worth its weight in gold. Dioscorides listed horseradish equally as Persicon sinapi (Diosc. 2.186) or Sinapi persicum (Diosc. 2.168),[8] which Pliny's Natural History reported as Persicon napy;[9] Cato discusses the plant in his treatises on agriculture, and a mural in Pompeii shows the plant. Horseradish is probably the plant mentioned by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History under the name of Amoracia, and recommended by him for its medicinal qualities, and possibly the wild radish, or raphanos agrios of the Greeks. The early Renaissance herbalists Pietro Andrea Mattioli and John Gerard showed it under Raphanus.[10] Its modern Linnaean genus Armoracia was first applied to it by Heinrich Bernhard Ruppius, in his Flora Jenensis, 1745, but Linnaeus himself called it Coclearia armoracia.</p> <p>Both root and leaves were used as a medicine during the Middle Ages. The root was used as a condiment on meats in Germany, Scandinavia, and Britain. It was introduced to North America during European colonialization both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson mention horseradish in garden accounts.</p> <p>William Turner mentions horseradish as Red Cole in his "Herbal" (1551–1568), but not as a condiment. In The Herball, or Generall Historie of Plantes (1597), John Gerard describes it under the name of raphanus rusticanus, stating that it occurs wild in several parts of England. After referring to its medicinal uses, he says:</p> <p>The Horse Radish stamped with a little vinegar put thereto, is commonly used among the Germans for sauce to eat fish with and such like meats as we do mustard.</p> <p>The word horseradish is attested in English from the 1590s. It combines the word horse (formerly used in a figurative sense to mean strong or coarse) and the word radish.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Horseradish is perennial in hardiness zones 2–9 and can be grown as an annual in other zones, although not as successfully as in zones with both a long growing season and winter temperatures cold enough to ensure plant dormancy. After the first frost in autumn kills the leaves, the root is dug and divided. The main root is harvested and one or more large offshoots of the main root are replanted to produce next year's crop. Horseradish left undisturbed in the garden spreads via underground shoots and can become invasive. Older roots left in the ground become woody, after which they are no longer culinarily useful, although older plants can be dug and re-divided to start new plants.[11][15] The early season leaves can be distinctively different, asymmetric spiky, before the mature typical flat broad leaves start to be developed.</p> <p><strong>Culinary uses</strong></p> <p>The distinctive pungent taste of horseradish is from the compound allyl isothiocyanate. Upon crushing the flesh of horseradish, the enzyme myrosinase is released and acts on the glucosinolates sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, which are precursors to the allyl isothiocyanate. The allyl isothiocyanate serves the plant as a natural defense against herbivores. Since allyl isothiocyanate is harmful to the plant itself, it is stored in the harmless form of the glucosinolate, separate from the myrosinase enzyme. When an animal chews the plant, the allyl isothiocyanate is released, repelling the animal. Allyl isothiocyanate is an unstable compound, degrading over the course of days at 37 °C (99 °F). Because of this instability, horseradish sauces lack the pungency of the freshly crushed roots.</p> <p>Cooks use the terms "horseradish" or "prepared horseradish" to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in color. It can be stored for months under refrigeration, but eventually will darken, indicating it is losing flavour and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, while edible, are not commonly eaten, and are referred to as "horseradish greens", which have a flavor similar to that of the roots.</p> <p><strong>Horseradish sauce</strong></p> <p>Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland.[19] In the UK, it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast; but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: "his wit's as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard" in Henry IV Part II[20]). A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany.[citation needed] In France, sauce au raifort is popular in Alsatian cuisine.[citation needed] In Russia horseradish root is usually mixed with grated garlic and small amount of tomatoes for color.</p> <p>In the US the term "horseradish sauce" refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread. Horseradish cream is a mixture of horseradish and sour cream and is served alongside au jus for a prime rib dinner.</p> <p><strong>Vegetable</strong></p> <p>In Central and Eastern Europe horseradish is called khren (in various spellings like kren) in many Slavic languages, in Austria, in parts of Germany (where the other German name Meerrettich isn't used), in North-East Italy, and in Yiddish (כריין transliterated as khreyn).</p> <p>There are two varieties of khreyn. "Red" khreyn is mixed with red beetroot and "white" khreyn contains no beetroot. It is popular in Ukraine (under the name of хрін, khrin), in Belarus (under the name of хрэн, chren), in Poland (under the name of chrzan), in the Czech Republic (křen), in Russia (хрен, khren), in Hungary (torma), in Romania (hrean), in Lithuania (krienai), in Bulgaria (хрян, khryan), and in Slovakia (under the name of chren). Having this on the table is a part of Christian Easter and Jewish Passover tradition in Eastern and Central Europe.</p> <p>In parts of Southern Germany like Franconia, "Kren" is an essential component of the traditional wedding dinner. It is served with cooked beef and a dip made from lingonberry to balance the slight hotness of the Kren.</p> <p>In Poland, a variety with red beetroot is called ćwikła z chrzanem or simply ćwikła.</p> <p>In Ashkenazi European Jewish cooking beetroot horseradish is commonly served with gefilte fish.</p> <p>In Transylvania and other Romanian regions, Red beetroot with horseradish is also used as a salad served with lamb dishes at Easter called sfecla cu hrean.</p> <p>In Serbia, ren is an essential condiment with cooked meat and freshly roasted suckling pig.</p> <p>In Croatia, freshly grated horseradish (Croatian: Hren) is often eaten with boiled ham or beef.</p> <p>In Slovenia, and in the adjacent Italian regions of Friuli Venezia Giulia and nearby Italian region of Veneto, horseradish (often grated and mixed with sour cream, vinegar, hard-boiled eggs, or apples) is also a traditional Easter dish.</p> <p>Further west in the Italian regions of Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, and Piedmont, it is called "barbaforte (strong beard)" and is a traditional accompaniment to bollito misto; while in north-eastern regions like Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, it is still called "kren" or "cren". In the southern region of Basilicata it is known as "rafano" and used for the preparation of the so-called "rafanata", a main course made of horseradish, eggs, cheese and sausage.</p> <p>Horseradish is also used as a main ingredient for soups. In the Polish region of Silesia, horseradish soup is a common Easter Day dish.</p> <p><strong>Relation to wasabi</strong></p> <p>The Japanese condiment wasabi, although traditionally prepared from the wasabi plant, is now usually made with horseradish due to the scarcity of the wasabi plant.[27] The Japanese botanical name for horseradish is seiyōwasabi (セイヨウワサビ, 西洋山葵), or "Western wasabi". Both plants are members of the family Brassicaceae.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional content</strong></p> <p>In a 100 gram amount, prepared horseradish provides 48 calories and has high content of vitamin C with moderate content of sodium, folate and dietary fiber, while other essential nutrients are negligible in content. In a typical serving of one tablespoon (15 grams), horseradish supplies no significant nutrient content.</p> <p>Horseradish contains volatile oils, notably mustard oil, and allyl isothiocyanate.</p> <p><strong>Biomedical uses</strong></p> <p>The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), found in the plant, is used extensively in molecular biology and biochemistry primarily for its ability to amplify a weak signal and increase detectability of a target molecule. HRP has been used in decades of research to visualize under microscopy and assess non-quantitatively the permeability of capillaries, particularly those of the brain.</p> <p><strong><em>How to Grow Horseradish from Seed</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Timing</strong></p> <p>For first season harvests, start the seeds indoors in January to February and transplant out in April. The goal is to achieve large, fully established roots that can be divided and/or replanted. If time is not pressing, direct sow any time from March into summer. Optimal soil temperature: 7-23°C (45-75°F).</p> <p><strong>Starting</strong></p> <p>Sow seeds 5mm-1cm (¼-½”) deep in well cultivated, deep soiil. Seeds will sprout in 7-25 days, depending on conditions. Thin or transplant to 20cm (8″) apart in rows 40-50cm (16-20″) apart.</p> <p><strong>Growing</strong></p> <p>Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. Well drained, warm soil in full sun is best. Raised beds help with both drainage and warmth. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer for every 3m (10′) of row. Newly emerged leaves are edible, or should be left to mature if growing for the roots. The flower petals are also edible — flowers should be removed before they set seeds, as they will self-sow with enthusiasm.</p> <p><strong>Harvest</strong></p> <p>For the leaves, harvest as needed, shortly after they emerge, before they become woody. For the roots, harvest November through March. The roots can also be lifted and stored for spring planting to keep the crop going from season to season.</p> <p><strong>Diseases &amp; Pests</strong></p> <p>In our experience, insects do not cause problems for horseradish.</p> <p><strong>Companion Planting</strong></p> <p>Horseradish is thought to repel aphids and whiteflies, blister beetles, potato beetles, and some varieties of caterpillar. Its flowers attract beneficial predatory hoverflies.</p> <h2><strong>How to plant Horseradish seedlings:</strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="font-family:georgia, palatino, serif;">When you get seedlings, plant at a depth of 5-6 cm, planting seedlings horizontally, spacing between seedlings should be 25 cm.</span></strong></span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="font-family:georgia, palatino, serif;">Distance from row to row 70 cm.</span></strong></span></p>
P 412 R
Horseradish Root / Seedlings Ready For Planting 3.25 - 6
  • Nové
German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves 2.95 - 3

German Extra Hardy Garlic...

Cena 2,95 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for 10 Garlic cloves</strong></span></h2> <p>German Extra Hardy, is also known as German White, Northern White and German Stiffneck is a large, beautiful and well-formed porcelain garlic. These are all the same garlic but grown in different places under different names. Its flavor is very strong and robust and sticks around for a long time.</p> <p>The average weight of garlic cloves 5-6 g.</p> <p>From a grower's perspective, it is a tall dark green plant and is a very good survivor, usually grows healthy and appears to be somewhat resistant to many of the diseases that can affect garlic. It originally came from Germany but grows well in all but the most southerly states, where it is marginal.</p> <p>Being a Porcelain, German Extra Hardy stores a long time at cool room temp for around 9-10 months or longer.</p> </body> </html>
P 416 GEH
German Extra Hardy Garlic cloves 2.95 - 3
  • Nové

Shallot Long French Bulbs

Shallot Long French Bulbs

Cena 2,50 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><strong><em>Shallot Long French Bulbs</em></strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#d0121a;"><strong>Price for package with 5 Bulbs</strong></span></h2> <p>An excellent, slightly elongated shallot, with copper-coloured skins and great tasting pink-tinged flesh. Each bulb yields 8-20 bulbs at harvest. Plant from mid January onwards. RHS Award of Garden Merit winner.</p> <p>Grown in Brittany, in the heart of France’s main shallot growing region, these superb certified varieties are of superior quality and will produce an outstanding crop for you.</p> <p><span><span>Hardiness:</span></span><span><span>-5 degrees</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Bulbs:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Height:</span></span><span><span>31-40cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Spread:</span></span><span><span>11-20cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>RHS Award of Garden Merit:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Beds &amp; Borders:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Prefers Full Sun:</span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <h1 class="title style-scope ytd-video-primary-info-renderer"><a href="https://youtu.be/GGEb4C2bb9s" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Harvesting Shallots &amp; Potatoes &amp; Leeks</a></h1> <h2><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h2> <p>The <b>shallot</b> is a type of onion, specifically a botanical variety of the species <i>Allium cepa</i>.</p> <p>The shallot was formerly classified as a separate species, <i>A. ascalonicum</i>, a name now considered a synonym of the currently accepted name.</p> <p>Its close relatives include the garlic, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Names">Names</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"> <div class="thumbcaption">Shallots are called "small onions" in South India and are used extensively in cooking there.</div> </div> </div> <p>Shallots probably originated in Central or Southwest Asia, travelling from there to India and the eastern Mediterranean. The name "shallot" comes from Ashkelon, an ancient Canaanite city,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup> where people in classical Greek times believed shallots originated.<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <p>The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for the Persian shallot <i>(A. stipitatum)</i>, from the Zagros Mountains in Iran and Iraq. The term <i>shallot</i> is further used for the French red shallot (<i>Allium cepa</i> var. <i>aggregatum</i>, or the <i>A. cepa</i> Aggregatum Group) and the French gray shallot or griselle (<i>Allium oschaninii</i>), a species referred to as "true shallot";<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-1" class="reference">[6]</sup> it grows wild from Central to Southwest Asia. The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for a scallion in New Orleans and among English-speaking people in Quebec while the term <i>French shallot</i> refers to the plant referred to on this page.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup> Anglophone Quebecers and British English speakers stress the second syllable of <i>shallot</i>.</p> <p>The term <i>eschalot</i>, derived from the French word <i>échalote</i>, can also be used to refer to the shallot.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description_and_cultivation">Description and cultivation</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG/150px-A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot plant (<i>A. cepa var. aggregatum</i>) growing in Castelltallat, Spain</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9c/2005onion_and_shallot.PNG/150px-2005onion_and_shallot.PNG" width="150" height="66" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Onion and shallot output in 2005</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e2/Shallot_whole_plant.jpg/220px-Shallot_whole_plant.jpg" width="220" height="60" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Whole shallot plants, consist of roots, bulbs, leaves, stalks, and flowers</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Shallot_seeds.png/150px-Shallot_seeds.png" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot seeds</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fe/Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG/150px-Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /><div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallots on sale in India</div> </div> </div> <p>Like garlic, shallots are formed in clusters of offsets with a head composed of multiple cloves. The skin colour of shallots can vary from golden brown to gray to rose red, and their off-white flesh is usually tinged with green or magenta.</p> <p>Shallots are extensively cultivated for culinary uses, propagated by offsets. In some regions ("long-season areas"), the offsets are usually planted in autumn (September or October in the Northern Hemisphere).<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup> In some other regions, the suggested planting time for the principal crop is early spring (typically in February or the beginning of March in the Northern Hemisphere).</p> <p>In planting, the tops of the bulbs should be kept a little above ground, and the soil surrounding the bulbs is often drawn away when the roots have taken hold. They come to maturity in summer, although fresh shallots can now be found year-round in supermarkets. Shallots should not be planted on ground recently manured.</p> <p>In Africa, shallots are grown in the area around Anloga in southeastern Ghana.</p> <p>Shallots suffer damage from leek moth larvae, which mine into the leaves or bulbs of the plant.</p> <p></p>
P 404
Shallot Long French Bulbs
  • Nové

Variety from Peru

Peruvian Purple Potato Seeds 3.05 - 6

Peruvian Purple Potato Seeds

Cena 2,95 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Peruvian Purple Potatoes Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">The price is for 5 or 10 purple seed potatoes.</span></strong></h2> <p>We send it like young and small, so it can be delivered to any Mailbox. It has the taste and texture of an ordinary variety but boasts vivid purple flesh which retains its color during cooking. High in anthocyanin antioxidants, it’s better for you too. Ideal for mashing, baking, roasting and microwaving, as well as making spectacular chips and Pommes Frites!</p> <p>If you’re a spud lover but stopped eating potatoes due to their reputation of causing weight gain, you may be in luck. Studies show it could be the potato you choose in addition to how the potato is prepared that make a difference. What about french fries? Well, those fries are six times more likely to cause weight gain if enjoyed too often, and besides, the super high temperatures they’re cooked at cause the loss of any possible nutrients, so why bother? And if you think adding all those delicious fatty toppings is the way to go, think again. Instead, opt for purple potatoes.</p> <p>Purple potatoes are <strong>high-antioxidant foods</strong> that are eye-catching since the skin and the flesh are both purple, making them a beautiful adornment to any plate. But it’s not just the color that’s appealing. Purple potatoes offer a host of awesome benefits from working as a healthy food-coloring agent to helping regulate blood pressure to aiding athletic performance and more.</p> <p><strong>Benefits of Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <ol> <li><strong> Healthy Food-Coloring Alternative</strong></li> </ol> <p>Potatoes, carrots and other <strong>root vegetables</strong> are used for coloring foods and grown specifically for the natural colors industry. This is great news since they’re completely natural versus the numerous chemical <strong>food dyes linked to cancer</strong> that have been used for years.</p> <p>The American Chemical Society documents the research that has been done regarding this food use, noting that the purple sweet potato is chock-full of anthocyanins, which provide health benefits not found in artificial food colors. Purple sweet potato anthocyanins are great for food and beverage coloring and are used in food products, such as fruit drinks, vitamin waters, ice cream and yogurt. What makes them unique goes beyond their color. They’re more stable options because they do not break down easily, making them consistent in providing color while giving little to no taste. (2)</p> <p>Though it’s difficult to extract, it’s still a better choice given the traditional synthetic versions of colorings and the process of extraction from cochineal insects. In fact, cochineal insects feed on a certain type of cactus native to South America and Mexico, and it takes about 2,500 bugs to produce just one ounce of cochineal extract, which is often used in ice creams, yogurts, candy, beverages and the like.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Help Lower and Regulate Blood Pressure</strong></li> </ol> <p>A small study presented by the American Chemical Society found that eating purple potatoes may lower blood pressure. This could be because of their effect on the capillaries and blood vessels, along with the high concentration of a phytochemical called chlorogenic acid, which has been linked to lower blood pressure found in some studies. (3) This research shows that plain purple potatoes, baked or cooked in the microwave, lowered the blood pressure of subjects that were reviewed by 3 percent to 4 percent, with no weight gain, and was likely due to the antioxidant behavior and phytonutrient density that these colorful gems exude.</p> <p>The health benefits are similar to what the popular nutrient-rich providers <strong>broccoli</strong>, spinach and Brussels sprouts provide. And let’s not forget about the potassium they contain, which offers the regulation of blood pressure. (4) This makes purple potatoes and other similar foods excellent additions to any <strong>high blood pressure diet</strong> treatment plan.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> May Prevent Blood Clots</strong></li> </ol> <p><strong>Thrombosis</strong>, a formal name for blood clotting, is a leading cause of death throughout the world but can be prevented, possibly by adding a little purple potato into your diet. As noted previously, the purple potato contains chlorogenic acid. This acid has been shown to break down blood clots and inhibit the enzymatic activity of procoagulant proteins and peptides.</p> <p>Research published in the <em>Journal of Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology</em>found that chlorogenic acid delayed the development of blood clots in mice, demonstrating the anti-thrombotic effect and making it a potential agent for the treatment of blood clots, including possible prevention.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Jam-Packed with Antioxidants and Phytonutrients</strong></li> </ol> <p>The purple potato is loaded with antioxidants and disease-fighting <strong>phytonutrients</strong> that work together to offer amazing health benefits, such as reducing inflammation. One of the elements within this powerful cocktail is the anthocyanin, which is what gives the potato its brilliant purple color. But it’s the <strong>free-radical scavenging</strong> and antioxidant capabilities of the anthocyanin pigments that gives the desired health benefits.</p> <p>Anthocyanin pigments as medicine have been a part of folk medicine for ages and used as remedies for liver dysfunction and hypertension, and much like the <strong>bilberry</strong>, anthocyanins have been linked to helping reduce the risks of eye diseases and infections. (6) </p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> Provides Fiber</strong></li> </ol> <p>Most people don’t eat enough fiber, according to numerous reports. Maybe a little purple potato can help with that problem since it’s a healthier <strong>high-fiber food</strong>. Why is fiber so important? One of the biggest reasons is it helps keep things moving along smoothly through your digestive system, which can help eliminate constipation, irregularity and discomfort.</p> <p>Fiber is classified as soluble, which means it dissolves in water, or insoluble, which doesn’t. Potatoes contain the insoluble form as well as whole-wheat flour, wheat bran, nuts, beans, and vegetables, like cauliflower and green beans. Including both soluble and insoluble fiber promotes the best health, and purple potatoes offer a good dose of the insoluble kind to help reach the proper amount of fiber needs. (7) </p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong> Great for Endurance Athletes and Ultra Runners</strong></li> </ol> <p>Another reason that insoluble fiber is so helpful is that it can provide a sort of time-released effect that helps endurance athletes sustain high energy levels for long periods of time. In fact, it’s not unusual to find potatoes at an aid station during a long-distance race.</p> <p><em>Runner’s World</em> reports that while the ever-so famous carb-loader pasta seems to take front stage, the potato may do a better job, not only the night before but also the day of an event by providing more energy-delivering complex carbohydrates. Not only are they super easy to prepare, but they’re easy to digest — a common concern with most athletes. As well, potassium is useful for athletes of all types, in particular, due to the electrolytes it contains. The purple potato contains 341 milligrams of potassium per half cup serving, which is 10 percent of the daily recommended value. This may make the potato the perfect carb for athletes — and to help prevent <strong>low potassium</strong>. (8)</p> <p><strong>Purple Potatoes Nutrition</strong></p> <p>A half cup of diced, raw purple potatoes contains about: (9)</p> <ul> <li>52 calories</li> <li>12 grams carbohydrates</li> <li>1.4 grams protein</li> <li>0.1 gram fat</li> <li>1.3 grams fiber</li> <li>6.5 milligrams vitamin C (11 percent DV)</li> <li>341 milligrams potassium (10 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligrams vitamin B6 (6 percent DV)</li> <li>45.7 milligrams phosphorus (5 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligrams copper (5 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligram manganese (5 percent DV)</li> <li>0.1 milligram thiamine (4 percent DV)</li> <li>0.9 milligram niacin (4 percent DV)</li> <li>16.5 milligrams magnesium (4 percent DV)</li> </ul> <p><strong>How to Use Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>Purple potatoes are versatile but can become a little mushy if overcooked. Even though they have a rich, vibrant violet color, their flavor is more subtle than some other potato varieties. Because of this, unlike the <strong>sweet potato</strong> that’s delicious all by itself, the purple potato is usually prepared by adding seasonings. Keep in mind that boiling or baking is the best method versus deep frying, which kills any useful nutrients. Use a little coconut or olive oil with some salt and pepper for a delightful addition to any meal.</p> <p><strong>Purple Potato Recipes</strong></p> <p>There are many ways to utilize purple potatoes in recipes. Try this one to start:</p> <p><strong>Roasted Rosemary Garlic and Turmeric Purple Potatoes with Leeks</strong></p> <p>INGREDIENTS:</p> <ul> <li>2 sprigs fresh rosemary (save one for garnish)</li> <li>10 small purple potatoes</li> <li>1 teaspoon sea salt</li> <li>1 teaspoon pepper</li> <li>1 teaspoon turmeric</li> <li>1/4 cup leeks, sliced</li> <li>2 cloves garlic, minced</li> <li>2.5 tablespoons coconut oil</li> </ul> <p>DIRECTIONS:</p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 375 degrees.</li> <li>Slice the leeks and garlic and set aside.</li> <li>Rinse potatoes and cut in small pieces about a quarter inch thick.</li> <li>In a bowl, mix the leeks, garlic, turmeric and potatoes with the coconut oil. It may help to melt the coconut oil first.</li> <li>Add the sea salt, pepper and chopped rosemary, and mix well.</li> <li>Now place the potatoes to a baking sheet lined with foil.</li> <li>Roast for 35–45 minutes or until potatoes are soft and begin to brown.</li> <li>Place a half cup serving as a side dish on a plate, and garnish with a small sprig of rosemary.</li> </ol> <p>You can also try Purple Potato Salad with Avocado-Chia Dressing recipe and use purple potatoes in most side dishes that utilize potatoes.</p> <p><strong>History of Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>The history of the purple potato goes back to what’s known as the purple Peruvian, which is an heirloom fingerling potato. Potatoes, in addition to tomatoes, peppers and eggplants, are part of the <em>Solanaceae</em> or <strong>nightshade vegetables</strong> family. The purple or blue violet potato fits into what has been called vitelotte, though not necessarily violet in color. This violet or purple potato may have been noted as early as 1817, listed as available at the market of Les Halles.</p> <p>Information published in 1863 listed five possible colors for the vitelotte, which were white, yellow, pink, red and violet. In 1873, Alexandre Dumas, a French author, wrote in his Grand dictionnaire de cuisine that “… the best of all are unquestionably the violet [ones], preferable even to the red [ones], [and] known in Paris by the name of <em>Vitelottes.” </em>(10, 11) </p> <p>The purple potato comes with special names, such as purple majesty, purple viking and purple Peruvian, and is usually available all year long. These golf ball-sized potatoes are popular in South America, originating in Peru and Bolivia, and they can reach a slightly larger size if allowed to reach full maturity. They have a nutty, earthy flavor and are perfect as a side dish for most anything. (12)</p> <p>While all potatoes, including the purple potato, blue potato, white potato, yellow potato and sweet potato, are high in <strong>carbohydrates</strong>, they contain useful fiber, vitamins and minerals. But the most nutrient-dense versions are those with the colorful flesh.</p> <p><strong>Risks with Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>There are no known risks of eating purple potatoes, but as always, if you experience a negative reaction, stop eating immediately.</p> <p><strong>Final Thoughts on Purple Potatoes</strong></p> <p>The purple potato, if prepared correctly, can be an excellent spud for your health. It’s a better choice for food colorings, eliminating chemical intake in the body, contains useful phytonutrients and the antioxidants it contains are so powerful that may help with inflammation.</p> <p>In addition, purple potatoes can help eliminate possible blood clots and provide useful fiber to help with <strong>constipation</strong> and digestion. A potassium-loaded complex carbohydrate, this powerful potato may help athletes with performance and sustainability during endurance-based activities as well</p> <p>From the sound of it, you might think leaky gut only affects the digestive system, but in reality it can affect more. Because Leaky Gut is so common, and such an enigma, I’m offering a free webinar on all things leaky gut.</p> </body> </html>
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Peruvian Purple Potato Seeds 3.05 - 6
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Turmeric Live Rhizomes (Curcuma longa)

Turmeric Live Rhizomes...

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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><b>Turmeric Live Rhizomes (Curcuma longa)</b></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f20202;"><b>Price for package of <strong>10 </strong>Rhizomes.</b></span></h2> <p><b>Turmeric</b> (<i>Curcuma longa</i>) (<span class="nowrap"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'t' in 'tie'">t</span><span title="/ɜːr/: 'ur' in 'fur'">ɜːr</span><span title="'m' in 'my'">m</span><span title="/ər/: 'er' in 'letter'">ər</span><span title="/ɪ/: 'i' in 'kit'">ɪ</span><span title="'k' in 'kind'">k</span></span>/</span></span>) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup> It is native to the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia, and requires temperatures between 20 and 30 °C (68–86 °F) and a considerable amount of annual rainfall to thrive. Plants are gathered annually for their rhizomes and propagated from some of those rhizomes in the following season.</p> <p>When not used fresh, the rhizomes are boiled in water for about 30–45 minutes and then dried in hot ovens, after which they are ground into a deep-orange-yellow powder<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup>commonly used as a coloring and flavoring agent in many Asian cuisines, especially for curries, as well as for dyeing. Turmeric powder has a warm, bitter, pepper-like flavor and earthy, mustard-like aroma.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-brennan_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <p>Although long used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat various diseases, there is little high-quality clinical evidence for use of turmeric or its main constituent, curcumin, as a therapy.<sup id="cite_ref-nelson_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-nccih_8-0" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2e/Curcuma_longa_-_K%C3%B6hler%E2%80%93s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-199.jpg/200px-Curcuma_longa_-_K%C3%B6hler%E2%80%93s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-199.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="200" height="245" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Botanical view of <i>Curcuma longa</i></div> </div> </div> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="History">History</span></h2> <p>Turmeric has been used in Asia for thousands of years and is a major part of Ayurveda, Siddha medicine, Unani, and traditional Chinese medicine.<sup id="cite_ref-Chattopadhyay_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup> It was first used as a dye, and then later for its medicinal properties.<sup id="cite_ref-NCCIH_10-0" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <p>The origin of the name is uncertain. It possibly derives from Middle English or Early Modern English as <i><span xml:lang="enm" lang="enm">turmeryte</span></i> or <i><span xml:lang="enm" lang="enm">tarmaret</span></i>. It may be of Latin origin, <i><span xml:lang="la" lang="la">terra merita</span></i> ("meritorious earth").<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup> The name of the genus, <i>Curcuma</i>, is derived from the Sanskrit <i><span xml:lang="sa-latn" lang="sa-latn">kuṅkuma</span></i>, referring to both turmeric and saffron, used in India since ancient times.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Botanical_description">Botanical description</span></h2> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Appearance">Appearance</span></h3> <p>Turmeric is a perennial herbaceous plant that reaches up to 1 m (3 ft 3 in) tall. Highly branched, yellow to orange, cylindrical, aromatic rhizomes are found. The leaves are alternateand arranged in two rows. They are divided into leaf sheath, petiole, and leaf blade.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup> From the leaf sheaths, a false stem is formed. The petiole is 50 to 115 cm (20–45 in) long. The simple leaf blades are usually 76 to 115 cm (30–45 in) long and rarely up to 230 cm (91 in). They have a width of 38 to 45 cm (15–18 in) and are oblong to elliptic, narrowing at the tip.</p> <h3><span id="Inflorescence.2C_flower.2C_and_fruit"></span><span class="mw-headline">Inflorescence, flower, and fruit</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/41/Turmeric_Flower_Maharashtra_India.jpg/220px-Turmeric_Flower_Maharashtra_India.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="157" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Turmeric flower</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8b/Native_Turmeric_Cooktown.jpg/220px-Native_Turmeric_Cooktown.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="293" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Wild turmeric, Australia</div> </div> </div> <p>At the top of the inflorescence, stem bracts are present on which no flowers occur; these are white to green and sometimes, tinged reddish-purple, and the upper ends are tapered.<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup></p> <p>The hermaphrodite flowers are zygomorphic and threefold. The three 0.8 to 1.2 cm (0.3–0.5 in) long sepals are fused, white, have fluffy hairs and the three calyx teeth are unequal. The three bright-yellow petals are fused into a corolla tube up to 3 cm (1.2 in) long. The three corolla lobes have a length of 1.0 to 1.5 cm (0.39–0.59 in) and are triangular with soft-spiny upper ends. While the average corolla lobe is larger than the two lateral, only the median stamen of the inner circle is fertile. The dust bag is spurred at its base. All other stamens are converted to staminodes. The outer staminodes are shorter than the labellum. The labellum is yellowish, with a yellow ribbon in its center and it is obovate, with a length from 1.2 to 2.0 cm (0.47–0.79 in). Three carpels are under a constant, trilobed ovary adherent, which is sparsely hairy. The fruit capsule opens with three compartments.<sup id="cite_ref-Siewek_15-0" class="reference">[15]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-kaufen_16-0" class="reference">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-HKRS_17-0" class="reference">[17]</sup></p> <p>In East Asia, the flowering time is usually in August. Terminally on the false stem is a 12 to 20 cm (4.7–7.9 in) long inflorescence stem containing many flowers. The bracts are light green and ovate to oblong with a blunt upper end with a length of 3 to 5 cm (1.2–2.0 in).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Phytochemistry">Phytochemistry</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c9/CurcuminKeto.svg/256px-CurcuminKeto.svg.png" class="thumbimage" width="256" height="75" /> <div class="thumbcaption">Curcumin keto form</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/40/Curcumin.svg/256px-Curcumin.svg.png" class="thumbimage" width="256" height="75" /> <div class="thumbcaption">Curcumin enol form</div> </div> </div> <p>Turmeric powder is approximately 60–70% carbohydrates, 6–13% water, 6–8% protein, 5–10% fat, 3–7% dietary minerals, 3–7% essential oils, 2–7% dietary fiber, and 1–6% curcuminoids.<sup id="cite_ref-nelson_7-1" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>Phytochemical components of turmeric include diarylheptanoids, which occur from numerous curcuminoids, such as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin.<sup id="cite_ref-nelson_7-2" class="reference">[7]</sup>Curcumin constitutes 3.14% (on average) of powdered turmeric, having variations in content among the species of <i>Curcuma longa</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup> Some 34 essential oils are present in turmeric, among which turmerone, germacrone, atlantone, and zingiberene are major constituents.<sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Traditional_medicine">Traditional medicine</span></h3> <p>Turmeric grows wild in the forests of South and Southeast Asia where it is collected for use in Indian traditional medicine (also called Siddha or Ayurveda).<sup id="cite_ref-nelson_7-3" class="reference">[7]</sup> From clinical research, there is no high-quality evidence that turmeric has medicinal properties.<sup id="cite_ref-nelson_7-4" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary">Culinary</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><br /><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/Curcuma_longa_roots.jpg/220px-Curcuma_longa_roots.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="91" /><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0a/Turmeric-powder.jpg/220px-Turmeric-powder.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="220" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Turmeric powder</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Turmeric rhizome and powder</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/%E0%A4%93%E0%A4%B2%E0%A5%8D%E0%A4%AF%E0%A4%BE_%E0%A4%B9%E0%A4%B3%E0%A4%A6%E0%A5%80%E0%A4%9A%E0%A5%80_%E0%A4%AD%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%9C%E0%A5%80.jpg/220px-%E0%A4%93%E0%A4%B2%E0%A5%8D%E0%A4%AF%E0%A4%BE_%E0%A4%B9%E0%A4%B3%E0%A4%A6%E0%A5%80%E0%A4%9A%E0%A5%80_%E0%A4%AD%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%9C%E0%A5%80.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="165" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Curry using turmeric, referred to as <i>haldi ki Sabji</i>, a dish from India</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/62/Ganghwang-bap.jpg/220px-Ganghwang-bap.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="147" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> <i>Ganghwang-bap</i> (turmeric rice)</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Steamed_Goan_rice_and_jaggery_cakes.jpg/220px-Steamed_Goan_rice_and_jaggery_cakes.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="213" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> <i>Patoleo</i> – sweet rice cakessteamed in turmeric leaves consisting of a filling of coconut and coconut palm sugar prepared in Goan Catholic style.</div> </div> </div> <p>Turmeric is one of the key ingredients in many Asian dishes, imparting a mustard-like, earthy aroma and pungent, slightly bitter flavor to foods.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_5-1" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-brennan_6-1" class="reference">[6]</sup> Turmeric is used mostly in savory dishes, but also is used in some sweet dishes, such as the cake <i>sfouf</i>. In India, turmeric plant leaf is used to prepare special sweet dishes, <i>Patoleo</i>, by layering rice flour and coconut-jaggery mixture on the leaf, then closing and steaming it in a special utensil (<i>chondrõ</i>).<sup id="cite_ref-tradition_22-0" class="reference">[22]</sup> Most turmeric is used in the form of rhizome powder to impart a golden yellow color.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_5-2" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-brennan_6-2" class="reference">[6]</sup> It is used in many products such as canned beverages, baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurt, yellow cakes, orange juice, biscuits, popcorn color, cereals, sauces, and gelatin. It is a principal ingredient in curry powders.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_5-3" class="reference">[5]</sup> Although typically used in its dried, powdered form, turmeric also is used fresh, like ginger. It has numerous uses in East Asian recipes, such as pickle that contains large chunks of soft turmeric, made from fresh turmeric.</p> <p>Turmeric is used widely as a spice in South Asian and Middle Eastern cooking. Various Iranian <i>khoresh</i> dishes are started using onions caramelized in oil and turmeric, followed by other ingredients. The Moroccan spice mix ras el hanout typically includes turmeric. In South Africa, turmeric is used to give boiled white rice a golden color, known as <i>geelrys</i>(yellow rice) traditionally served with bobotie. In Vietnamese cuisine, turmeric powder is used to color and enhance the flavors of certain dishes, such as <i>bánh xèo, bánh khọt</i>, and <i>mi quang</i>. The staple Cambodian curry paste, <i>kroeung</i>, used in many dishes including <i>Amok</i>, typically contains fresh turmeric. In Indonesia, turmeric leaves are used for Minang or Padang curry base of Sumatra, such as <i>rendang</i>, <i>sate padang</i>, and many other varieties. In Thailand, fresh turmeric rhizomes are used widely in many dishes, in particular in the southern Thai cuisine, such as yellow curry and turmeric soup. Turmeric is used in a hot drink called the "turmeric latte" or "golden milk" made with non-dairy milks, such as coconut milk.<sup id="cite_ref-23" class="reference">[23]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Dye">Dye</span></h3> <p>Turmeric makes a poor fabric dye, as it is not very light fast, but is commonly used in Indian clothing, such as saris and Buddhist monks's robes.<sup id="cite_ref-brennan_6-3" class="reference">[6]</sup> Turmeric (coded as E100, when used as a food additive),<sup id="cite_ref-24" class="reference">[24]</sup> is used to protect food products from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. A curcumin and polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water-containing products. Over-coloring, such as in pickles, relishes, and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading.</p> <p>In combination with annatto (E160b), turmeric has been used to color cheeses, yogurt, dry mixes, salad dressings, winter butter, and margarine. Turmeric also is used to give a yellow color to some prepared mustards, canned chicken broths, and other foods (often as a much cheaper replacement for saffron).<sup id="cite_ref-25" class="reference">[25]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Indicator">Indicator</span></h3> <p>Turmeric paper, also called curcuma paper or in German literature, <i>Curcumapapier</i>, is paper steeped in a tincture of turmeric and allowed to dry. It is used in chemical analysis as an indicator for acidity and alkalinity.<sup id="cite_ref-26" class="reference">[26]</sup> The paper is yellow in acidic and neutral solutions and turns brown to reddish-brown in alkaline solutions, with transition between pH of 7.4 and 9.2.<sup id="cite_ref-27" class="reference">[27]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Traditional_uses">Traditional uses</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/dc/Naturalis_Biodiversity_Center_-_L.0939330_-_Bernecker%2C_A._-_Curcuma_domestica_Valeton_-_Artwork.jpeg/220px-Naturalis_Biodiversity_Center_-_L.0939330_-_Bernecker%2C_A._-_Curcuma_domestica_Valeton_-_Artwork.jpeg" class="thumbimage" width="220" height="286" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> <i>Curcuma domestica</i> Valeton, a drawing by A. Bernecker around 1860</div> </div> </div> <p>In Ayurvedic and Siddha practices, turmeric has been used as an attempted treatment for a variety of internal disorders, such as indigestion, throat infections, common colds, or liver ailments, as well as topically, to cleanse wounds or treat skin sores.<sup id="cite_ref-nelson_7-5" class="reference">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-nccih_8-1" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>In Eastern India, the plant is used as one of the nine components of navapatrika along with young plantain or banana plant, taro leaves, barley (<i>jayanti</i>), wood apple (<i>bilva</i>), pomegranate (<i>darimba</i>), <i>asoka</i>, <i>manaka</i> or <i>manakochu</i>, and rice paddy. The Navapatrika worship is an important part of Durga festival rituals.<sup id="cite_ref-28" class="reference">[28]</sup></p> <p>Haldi ceremony (called <i>Gaye holud</i> in Bengal) (literally "yellow on the body") is a ceremony observed during Hindu and South Asian Muslim wedding celebrations in many parts of India, including Bengal, Punjab, Maharashtra, and Gujarat, and in Pakistan.<sup id="cite_ref-29" class="reference">[29]</sup></p> <p>In Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh, as a part of the Tamil–Telugu marriage ritual, dried turmeric tuber tied with string is used to create a Thali necklace, the equivalent of marriage rings in western cultures. In western and coastal India, during weddings of the Marathi and Konkani people, Kannada Brahmins turmeric tubers are tied with strings by the couple to their wrists during a ceremony, <i>Kankanabandhana</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-maha_30-0" class="reference">[30]</sup></p> <div class="center"> <div class="thumb tnone"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c1/Khandoba_temple_Pune.jpg/550px-Khandoba_temple_Pune.jpg" class="thumbimage" width="550" height="376" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Khandoba's newer Temple in Jejuri. Notice devotees showering turmeric powder (bhandara) on each other.</div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Friedrich Ratzel reported in <i>The History of Mankind</i> during 1896, that in Micronesia, turmeric powder was applied for embellishment of body, clothing, utensils, and ceremonial uses.<sup id="cite_ref-31" class="reference">[31]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Adulteration">Adulteration</span></h2> <p>As turmeric and other spices are commonly sold by weight, the potential exists for powders of toxic, cheaper agents with a similar color to be added, such as lead(II,IV) oxide, giving turmeric an orange-red color instead of its native gold-yellow.<sup id="cite_ref-32" class="reference">[32]</sup> Another common adulterant in turmeric, metanil yellow (also known as acid yellow 36), is considered an illegal dye for use in foods by the British Food Standards Agency.<sup id="cite_ref-33" class="reference">[33]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Medical_research">Medical research</span></h2> <div class="hatnote navigation-not-searchable">See also: Curcumin</div> <p>Claims that curcumin in turmeric may help to reduce inflammation have not been supported by strong studies.<sup id="cite_ref-nelson_7-6" class="reference">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-nccih_8-2" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>Turmeric or its principal constituent, curcumin, has been studied in numerous clinical trials for various human diseases and conditions, but the conclusions have either been uncertain or negative.<sup id="cite_ref-nelson_7-7" class="reference">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-34" class="reference">[34]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-35" class="reference">[35]</sup></p> </body> </html>
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Turmeric Live Rhizomes (Curcuma longa)
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