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Bitter Melon Seeds...

Bitter Melon Seeds...

Cena 2,55 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Seeds Bitter Melon, Bitter Gourd, Balsam Pear (Momordica Charantia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price per pack of 5, 10, 50, 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>If the Balsam Pear did not exist a pharmaceutical company would invent it. &nbsp;In fact, there have been some ten studies published this past year about it, the latest as of this writing in February 2008 in the Journal of Food Biochemistry about its potential in diabetes treatment.</p> <p>A very common, bitter vegetable in Asian cuisine, &nbsp;the Balsam Pear, Momordica charantia, &nbsp;is a natural drug store for diabetics and others. It’s not a pear at all but a fruiting gourd and vine that smells like an old, well-used gym shoe. Don’t say you weren’t warned.</p> <div>The warty gourd is edible when green (and cooked) but turns toxic when orange ripe. It then splits characteristically into three parts, revealing red arils (fleshy seed covers). &nbsp;The ripe seeds inside the arils and orange flesh of the gourd are toxic and can make one violently lose fluids from both ends, and induce abortions. The red arils around the seeds, however, are edible. And notice this: The arils are 96% lycopene, which gives them their color. Just remember to spit out the seed from each aril.</div> <div>M. charantia is found Connecticut south to Florida, west to Texas, also Puerto Rico and the Hawaiian Islands. Incidentally, the bitter melon has twice the potassium of bananas and is also rich in vitamin A and C.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The Latin genus name, Momordica, (mo-MOR-dee-ka) &nbsp;means “to bite,” and refers to the jagged edges of the leaves, which appear as if they have been bitten. Charantia (char-AN-tee-ah) the species’ name, comes from Greek meaning beautiful flower. &nbsp;It’s native to tropical regions of the world though no one knows where it came from originally. Gray’s four-inch thick Manual of Botany, started in 1850 and revised in 1950, makes no mention of M. charantia in the United States but it is currently a serious crop weed in Florida and to 21 other crops around the world, bananas to soybeans. It’s a late comer to Florida or Gray was in the dark about it. In the Amazon, and as far away as India, it is used very much by local populations for food and medicine. &nbsp;Apparently a &nbsp;dynamic chemical factory, the M. charantia is being tested for treatment against cancer — leukemia in particular — &nbsp;AIDS, as an analgesic, and to moderate insulin resistance. It is often called the vegetable insulin. It does not increase insulin secretion but “speeds up carbohydrate use of the cells by affecting membrane lipids.” Seems like the smelly gym shoe hanging on the fence has a great future. But, it is not for everyone: Don’t eat the vegetable if you’re hypoglycemic or pregnant. In diabetics it can lower blood sugar too effectively. It also reduces fertility in men and women. &nbsp;And, it contains vicine. That can cause favism in people who have a variant glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. (I presume if you don’t know what that is you don’t have it. Favism is a severe reaction to fava beans and or their pollen. Occurs most often in Mediterranean men.)</div> <div>Cultivated versions of the M. charantia, also called Bitter Gourd or Wild Balsam Apple, are found in most Asian markets, and they, too, smell like an old gym shoe. The odor, thankfully, almost all goes away when cooked and the bitterness moderates, but does not go away. If you are not yet brave enough to pick your own, you can buy some or grow it yourself. There are many varieties and numerous recipes are on the Internet. The M. charantia is indeed bitter. Some cut up the vegetable and soak it in water, or salted water and or blanch it &nbsp;to reduce the bitterness.</div> <div>While I have never seen an Oriental family picking M. charantia off local fences here in Florida, I have seen many Hispanic families doing so. &nbsp;Dr. Julia Morton, a plant professor in south Florida, &nbsp;says besides the green fruit, the young leaves when cooked and drained are also edible and nutritious, with iron, phosphorous, calcium and vitamin C. I have never managed to get past the locker room bouquet to toss ‘em in a pot, and the fruit is just too bitter for me to enjoy. The ripe fruit pulp has been used as a soap substitute, which should give you some idea of the flavor. In India and Africa the cooked leaves are canned like spinach. The fragrant flowers can be used as seasoning when cooking.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Incidentally, if you have a glut of green Bitter Gourds, you can slice them, partially boil them with salted water, then dry them, sun or otherwise. They will last for several months. You can then fry them and use as you like. Also, drinking the fresh bitter juice is recommended by some naturopaths. That ain’t going to be easy, it’s really bitter…. much easier to tell someone to do it than do it yourself.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>REMEMBER: No part of the Momordica charantia is ever to be eaten raw, except for the red arils (and remember to spit the seeds out.) &nbsp;No part, other than the arils, is ever to be eaten when ripe, which is when it is turning from green to yellow to orange. Do not eat the yellow or orange fruit raw or cooked. It is toxic. Also, the green fruit is suspected in the poisoning of dogs and pigs.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Relatives: Momordica balsamina, which has longer spines on the fruit and can ripen to red, grows only in St. Lucie County in Florida and only a smattering of places in the southern U.S. &nbsp;M. balsamina fruit can be pickled or after soaking used as a cooked vegetable. Young shoots and tendrils are boiled as a green. The seeds are eaten. &nbsp;Momordica cochinchinensis produces a huge round fruit that is red when ripe. Young fruit boiled, not as bitter as M. charantia. Momordica dioica, small and roundish, &nbsp;is more esteemed than the rest. It is not bitter but sweet. Fruits, shoots, leaves and roots are boiled for food. There are also at least seven commercial cultivars of the Momordica gourds</div> <div>IDENTIFICATION: Momordica charantia: A slender, climbing annual vine to 18 feet with long-stalked leaves and yellow flowers where the leaf meets the stem. Young fruit emerald green turning to orange when ripe. At maturity, fruit splits into three irregular parts that curl backwards showing many reddish-brown or white seeds encased in scarlet arils.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>TIME OF YEAR: Fruit, summer and fall in warm climates, fall in northern climes.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>ENVIRONMENT: Love to climb, found in hammocks, disturbed sites, turf and ornamental landscapes, and citrus groves . It seems to be the most common vine on chain link fences in Florida.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>METHOD OF PREPARATION: None of it ripe except the arils. Boiled green fruit (including seeds) leaves and shoots, boiled twice. Or, cut open and remove seeds and fiber and parboil. &nbsp;Ripe parts toxic are too bitter to eat. &nbsp;(An adult can swallow hole two ripe seed and not have much distress.) Young leaves and shoots are boiled and eaten as a potherb. Flowers used as seasoning.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>HERB BLURB</div> <div>Herbalists say the charantia has long been used to treat diabetes and a host of other ailments from arthritis to jaundice. <p>&nbsp;</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">preswollen 2 days in water</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0,5-1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20 - 25° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-4 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds Gallery 05.11.2012.</span></p> <div><span style="color: #008000;">&nbsp;</span></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
V 7 (10 S)
Bitter Melon Seeds (Momordica Charantia)
  • Nové

Piel de Sapo Seeds (Cucumis melo)

Piel de Sapo Melon Seeds...

Cena 1,85 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Piel de Sapo Melon Seeds (Cucumis melo)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Piel de Sapo. Commonly known and marketed as Santa Claus melon, family Cucurbitaceae (Cucumis melo, Inodorus group) is a type of melon widely available in the Northern Hemisphere. It has a blotched green peel after which it is named (Piel De Sapo translates as "toad skin"). A closely related melon with the same shape but with yellow peel is known as "Amarillo" or Canary melon. Piel de Sapo originated in Spain where it is widely grown - about 30,000 hectares are cultivated annually. La Mancha is the main region in Spain producing this type with 12,000 hectares. They are grown outdoors with plantings starting in May and running until June. Production starts in mid-July and ends in September. Another important growing area is Murcia that has specialized in growing early crops. There, they plant mainly in Mid March and harvest from mid-June to mid-July.</p> <p>It has white sweet-tasting flesh and flourishes in slightly acidic or neutral soil. Large quantities are imported into Europe. It is grown in Brazil and Central America to supply produce to Spain during autumn, winter, and spring. The most popular cultivar in the last ten years in the main producing region (La Mancha) has been a hybrid named Sancho bred by the seedhouse Syngenta. Many open-pollinated cultivars were grown in Spain until recently but hybrids have replaced them almost entirely as they offer to the growers higher yields and better resistance to disease. Old cultivars have been preserved in germplasm collections.</p> </body> </html>
V 76
Piel de Sapo Seeds (Cucumis melo)
  • Nové
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Black Strawberry Seeds -...

Cena 2,25 €
,
5/ 5
<h2>Black Strawberry Seeds - Exotic Rare</h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span></h2> <p><strong style="color:#ff0000;font-size:18px;"></strong>A lovely Black Strawberry that is fully hardy. Perfect for small spaces or containers, it will produce an abundance of small sweet fruit, with a hint of pineapple.</p> <p>Heavy cropping and easy to grow.</p> <p>Perennial herb densely clustered with straighter branches.15-25cm in height. Cymose anthotaxy with juicy flesh. Require loosing and weeding at intervals on the loose fertile soil with ample organic fertilizers. Favor to warm and need moisture to live through the winter.</p> <div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3 align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p> </p> </div> </div>
V 1
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds
  • Nové

Yubari King Melon Seeds The most expensive fruit on the World 7.45 - 1

Yubari King Melon Seeds

Cena 4,95 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Yubari King Melon Seeds The most expensive fruit on the World</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5, 10, 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>TOKYO A remarkably sweet canteloupe auctioned in Japan fetched a record $12,000, making it one of the most expensive canteloupes ever sold in the country.</p> <p>In a society where melons are a luxury item commonly given as gifts the jaw-dropping auction last month shocked everyone! At that auction, a pair of "Yubari" cantaloupe melons sold for a record $23,500. Wikipedia Yubari</p> <p>A pair of cantaloupes from the bankrupt city of Yubari, Hokkaido, fetched a whopping 2 million yen at the first auction of the season at the Sapporo central wholesale market, the Japan Agricultural Cooperative's Yubari unit said. The price paid by Marui Imai Inc., a Sapporo-based department store, for the upmarket produce surpassed the previous record of 800,000 yen for two cantaloupes, JA Yubari said. "Perhaps the city's designation as a financially rehabilitating entity ironically helped generate an advertising effect," said a spokesperson for the former coal town, which went bankrupt last year. "This will encourage the city a lot."</p> <p>The two melons were put on display at Marui Imai's flagship outlet priced at 1 million yen apiece. Yoshikazu Hoshino, 59, a purchasing officer at the department store, said the cantaloupes were more for publicity than profit. "We were bullish in the bidding because we're celebrating our 135th anniversary this year. We wanted as many customers as possible to see them," he said. One of the million-yen fruits has already been sold, the store said. Other shoppers were stunned by the price.</p> <p>"It's not a price I can afford," said Ryoko Hino, a 79-year-old shopper.</p> <p>So the Yubari King costs generally from 100 to 1000 € / piece.</p> <p>How to Cultivate Yubari King Melon</p> <p>Side Selection</p> <p>Try to plant in a location that enjoys full sun and remember to water often. Keep in mind when planting that Yubari King is thought of as hardy, so this plant will survive close to or on freezing temperatures.</p> <p>Soil</p> <p>The soil the melons are grown in is volcanic ash. It's not what's in the volcanic soil, but how the soil behaves. It lets growers there easily control the temperature of the soil, and the ash lets water quickly drain through, allowing for the top to remain dry, which promotes the size of the melons. Yubari King needs a potting mix soil with a ph of 6.1 to 7.5 (weakly acidic soil to weakly alkaline soil). You just buy a bag of compost and add it to your soil to feed your plants. It is not only better for them, it is also cheaper.</p> <p>Seeding:</p> <p>Try to aim for a seed spacing of at least 1.89 feet (58.0 cm) and sow at a depth of around 0.5 inches (1.27 cm). Soil temperature should be kept higher than 21°C / 70°F to ensure good germination. By our calculations, you should look at sowing Yubari King about 14 days before your last frost date.</p> <p>Ensure that temperatures are mild and all chance of frost has passed before planting out, as Yubari King is a hardy plant.</p> <p>Planting</p> <p>Melon is planted in February. The first ones are ready to harvest 105 days after planting. The growing season ends in early September. Cutaway any diseased or pest damaged leaves first. This will enable the plant to put all of its energy into making a great Melon instead of making more leaves. Melons are an annual, not a perennial. They can grow more than 1 harvest but the first is always the best but if you have an heirloom and need the extra seed then let more fruit set after your first harvest. DO NOT let fruit set until AFTER your first harvest so all of the plant's energy (sugars) go into the Melon(s) on the vine.</p> <p>At long last, to see flowers appearing on the vines, which means melons are on their way! It seems like it takes forever but really it only has been a little over a month or so.</p> <p>Watering and Fertilizer You have covered this in the past but things change when the melons start to grow. You should water them every other day if your soil is well-drained. Keep an eye on the top of the soil and water when the top is dry to a depth of about ½ inch. There should never be a fear of overwatering if your soil drains well and containers have holes for excess water to leave from. Remember, very dry soil sheds water like a Ducks back. It will take time for the water to soak into the soil and you will have a lot of run-offs until it rehydrates. Never water with cold water since it will shock the plant a little and may slow growth or development of fruit. You may need to water every other day with 1 gal of water for every 4 cubic feet of growing medium but you might decide that you want to waterless. Your local weather will also play a role.</p> <p>If you started with a soil mix of compost, you should not need to fertilize your plants. You can do, however, like to add ½ tsp of Super Thrive to every 2 gallons of water. This will help them resist pests and develop much stronger. After the fruit gets to the size of a grapefruit You can use only water until harvest.</p> <p>Pollinate</p> <p>Melons will not appear out of anywhere. There needs to be a male and female flower for the Melon to form. The fruit will grow from the female flower. Male flowers are the first to appear on the plant. If you have other Melons growing in your yard then you might consider covering the Ichiba Kouji with a mosquito net to keep bees from pollinating your other melons, especially if they are an heirloom. When the female flowers appear, take a male flower and place it inside the female flower or use a small dust brush and swab the inside of the male flower and then swab the female flower to pollinate. You can also let bees do this for you if you wish. Only 2 Melons (at most) should be grown on the vine at a time. Each plant should yield 4 or more Melons if you let them but they will be smaller and lower quality. “I must sacrifice the others to make the best one possible.” - Japanese Melon Grower The Japanese master growers hand pollinate three flowers and let them get to about the size of a baseball, then select the best one and let only that one grow. The others can be chopped up and added to the compost pile.</p> <p>When Melons burst!</p> <p>The inside of the melon is growing so fast that the outside can’t keep up so a crack forms. At this point, the plant's sugars flow out to cover the crack and heal the melon. This is supposed to happen, in fact, if it doesn’t your doing something wrong. This is what forms the reticulation or netting. The finer the reticulation is, the juicier the inside is.</p> <p>“If the reticulation is great, the inside is great too.” – Japanese Melon Judge</p> <p>If you don’t make good netting, then you don’t make a good melon. This is where art makes an entrance. It is something that you’re going to have to experiment with to get the melon just the way you like them. If you just set it on the ground, then the melon will not form a perfect circle and the netting may be affected, not to mention bugs getting into them. If you put them on a trellis then the juices may not be evenly distributed or may become misshapen or even caught inside the trellis if you’re not careful. This is why you can use them to hang the melon so that it would not be disturbed.</p> <p>Harvesting</p> <p>After the cracking is over with and the melon is healed it is time for the next technique. Several times until you’re ready to harvest, you need to put on some cotton work gloves and rub firmly all around the melon. You should do this twice a week. For example Monday and Thursday. The reason for doing this is to make the Melon sweeter.</p> <p>“This is called Tama Fuki. It stimulates the melon and adds sweetness.” – Japanese Melon Grower</p> <p>Melons are hard to tell when they are ripe. They stay green and on the vine. So how do you know when they are ready? </p> <p>    1. The stem is “green and strong” (dry)</p> <p>     2. The bottom of the Melon is “flexible” (slightly soft)</p> <p>     3. It should feel heavier than it looks.</p> <p>     4. You should smell the Melon aroma when in close proximity.</p> <p>Pest and Diseases:</p> <p>Quality</p> <p>To most Americans, your melon will taste just like a regular melon. A really good melon but unless they know what they have in their hands then they will most likely overlook the quality. Only when they bite into a regular store-bought melon will they realize what they once held. The quality of your melon can be seen without cutting it open. If you look at a store-bought melon, you will see that the “netting” or reticulation is very fine or small. A great melon will have more pronounced or thicker lines in the reticulation. This quality level depends mostly on the watering schedule that is set. Personally we found that watering every other day to work best in my area but that may change depending on your climate. Remember that melons come from a desert environment. We wish you luck in your melon growing adventures!</p> </body> </html>
V 2 5-S
Yubari King Melon Seeds The most expensive fruit on the World 7.45 - 1
  • Nové
Noni Seeds (Morinda citrifolia, Rubiaceae) 1.95 - 1

Noni Seeds (Morinda...

Cena 2,20 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Noni Seeds (Morinda citrifolia, Rubiaceae)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Noni is a tropical fruit that was originally native to Polynesian islands but is now grown in many tropical regions around the world. It has been widely regarded in the traditional cultures of these regions to have medicinal properties. And it has a reputation as a relaxant and stress reliever, being used widely as a natural means of calming nerves and helping support sleep when consumed before bedtime.</p> <p>The easy-to-grow, tropical noni plant is a perennial that produces fruit year-round, even as a houseplant. Native to the South Pacific, it reaches heights of 10 feet in the climates of Tahiti, the Pacific Islands, South America and the Caribbean. Noni has large, waxy, pointed leaves and produces flowers from its lumpy, potato-shaped fruit with polygonal shaped sections. The juice, fruit, bark, and leaves of noni are all used for herbal remedies, according to the American Cancer Society.</p>
V 3
Noni Seeds (Morinda citrifolia, Rubiaceae) 1.95 - 1
  • Nové
Rambutan Fresh Seeds Exotic Fruits

Rambutan Seeds (Nephelium...

Cena 4,95 €
,
5/ 5
<div> <h2><strong>Rambutan Seeds (Nephelium Lappaceum) Exotic Fruits</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Details of the benefits of the fruit rambutan is as follows:</div> <div>Skin fruit: to overcome dysentery, fever bark: to overcome the aphthous ulcer Leaves: to overcome diarrhea and blacken the hair roots: to overcome the fever seeds: to overcome diabetes (diabetes mellitus) for drugs drunk, no dosage recommendations. See example usage below! For external, milled leaves until smooth, then add a little water. Use water perasannya to blacken the hair gray.</div> <div> <p>example usage: Dysentery. Rambutan fruit skin wash (10 pieces), cut into pieces as needed. Add three cups of drinking clean water, then boil until the water is left half. After, cold, strain and drink twice a day, masing-masing three-quarters glasses. Fever. Wash skin fruit rambutan that has dried (15 g). Add three cups of water boiled until clean, then boil for 15 minutes. Once cool, strain and drink three times a day, each one-third part. Blacken the hair gray. Wash the leaves sufficiently, then mashed rambutan until smooth. Add a little water while stir until evenly into dough-like mush. Production method and strain with a piece of cloth. Use the accumulated water to moisten the hair of their heads. Do every day until the visible results. Diabetes. Gongseng seed rambutan (five seeds), and then milled to a powder. %u2022Brewing time with one cup of hot water. After a cold, drinking the water all at once. Do times a day aphthous ulcer. </p> </div> <div>Efficacy and benefits of Rambutan-Rambutan is one of those plants that are multi-use. All parts of this plant, from the bark, leaves, seeds, until the roots, can serve as a remedy. Tawarnya power is also amazing. Fever, aphthous ulcer, dysentery, gray, until of diabetes, can heal with the right herb. Types of rambutan fruit that grows in Indonesia are: ropiah, simacan, sinyonya, lebakbulus, and binjei. For those of you who want to menamam fruit is how very easy there are three ways that kang salman know in breeding by planting seeds, buds, or grafting. <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Soak seeds in water and leave it for one night.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Place the seeds on the soil moist.</span><br /><span>Cover with a thin soil.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>20-25 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>1-8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Watering in the morning every day.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table></div> </div> <div> </div>
V 4
Rambutan Fresh Seeds Exotic Fruits
  • Nové
Japanese Silverberry - Autumn Olive Seeds (Elaeagnus umbellata) 2.45 - 1

Japanese Silverberry -...

Cena 2,45 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Autumn Olive Seeds Elaeagnus umbellata, Japanese silverberry</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h2> <div><span>Autumn olives are small in size and are round to oval in shape, growing on a deciduous shrub that can grow as tall as six meters in height. The spotted, matte skin is smooth and is painted in green, pink, and vibrant red hues. Inside, the opaque pink to red flesh is soft and juicy with one inedible seed in the center. Autumn olives are sweet, but can also be quite tart in taste depending on when they are picked in the season. In addition to the drupes, the leaves on the Autumn olive plant are oval and slightly elongated in shape, with dark green tops and grey to green undersides coated in silver scales. The leaves are also found in an alternating pattern and the edges of the leaves can be slightly rippled. The stem of the shrub is silver to golden brown with thorns and in the early spring cream to light yellow flowers can be found in clusters on the shrub. </span><br /> <h2>Seasons/Availability</h2> <span>Autumn olives are available in the late summer through late fall. </span><br /> <h2>Current Facts</h2> <span>Autumn olives, botanically classified as Elaeagnus umbellata, are known as a drupe, which is a fruit with an outer fleshy membrane and one single seed or pit inside. Also known as Japanese silverberry, Spreading oleaster, Umbellata oleaster, Autumn berries, and Autumn elaeagnus, Autumn olives are believed to have been given their name from their similarity in appearance to the Mediterranean olive tree even though the fruit is not an olive and is more similar to a berry. The Autumn olive plant is prolific and has the ability to thrive in poor soil, pastures, riverbanks, meadows, open woods, and even along roadsides. Originally introduced to North America to help control erosion, the plant quickly spread and has become an invasive species in specific regions of the United States. Though the plant is aggressive in its growth, it also provides a source of food for animals, and home chefs enjoy using the drupes in jams and baked goods. </span><br /> <h2>Nutritional Value</h2> <span>Autumn olives are high in vitamins A, E, and C and are known for their high content of the antioxidant, lycopene. </span><br /> <h2>Applications</h2> <span>Autumn olives are best suited for both raw and cooked applications such as boiling, mashing, and pureeing. They can be used in both sweet and savory applications and are commonly frozen, made into jam, fruit leather, fermented into wine, or even dried and ground into a powder. They can also be used in smoothies and drink recipes. When raw, Autumn olives pair well with yogurt and ice cream. When cooked, Autumn olives pair well with pork chops, chilled soups, and desserts such as crumbles. They will last for a couple of days when stored in a dry and well-ventilated space in the refrigerator. </span><br /><br /> <h2>Ethnic/Cultural Info</h2> <br /><span>Autumn olives are used as a key ingredient for health and wellness in Asia. Since it is native to the mountains of Eastern Asia, autumn olives are cultivated for their powerful antioxidants and are found in daily diets in Korea, China, and Japan. Traditional uses of Autumn olives include teas, wines, jams, and ground up into powder for medicine. </span><br /> <h2>Geography/History</h2> <span>Autumn olives originated in Asia with records in China, Japan, and Korea and have been growing since ancient times. They were then brought to the United States in 1830 and used as a solution to wildlife habitat and erosion control. Though it was an excellent solution to those needs, Autumn olives spread quickly and overtook many of the natural habitats earning itself the title of an invasive species. Today Autumn olives can also be found in Great Britain, Asia, Canada, and in the United States. </span></div> <div></div> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Pour hot water over the seeds and put them in water 6 hours.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 3-4 months in a moist substrate at 2-5 ° C in a refrigerator or cold house</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 20-23 ° C.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Germination takes up</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds Gallery 05.11.2012.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
V 5
Japanese Silverberry - Autumn Olive Seeds (Elaeagnus umbellata) 2.45 - 1
  • Nové
Sweetberry Honeysuckle...

Sweetberry Honeysuckle...

Cena 2,50 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Seeds Lonicera caerulea Blue-berried Honeysuckle Hardy -40C</strong></h2> <h2><strong style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></h2> <div>Lonicera caerulea (Blue-berried Honeysuckle or Sweetberry Honeysuckle) is a honeysuckle native throughout the cool temperate Northern Hemisphere.</div> <div>It is a deciduous shrub growing to 1.5-2 m tall. The leaves are opposite, oval, 3-8 cm long and 1-3 cm broad, glaucous green, with a slightly waxy texture. The flowers are yellowish-white, 12-16 mm long, with five equal lobes; they are produced in pairs on the shoots. The fruit is a blue berry about 1 cm diameter.</div> <div><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Propagation of Lonicera caerulea: </strong></span></div> <div><span style="color: #000000;">Stored seed requires 2 months cold stratification and should be sown as soon as possible in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 - 10cm with or without a heel, July/August in a frame. Good percentage. Cuttings of mature wood of the current season's growth, 15 - 20cm with or without a heel, November in a cold frame. Good percentage. Layering in autumn.</span></div> </body> </html>
V 6
Sweetberry Honeysuckle Seeds Hardy -40C (Lonicera caerulea)
  • Nové
Alpine Strawberry - White Soul Seeds

Alpine White Strawberry -...

Cena 5,50 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>Alpine White Strawberry - White Soul Seeds</h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 5, 50, 100, 500 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Alpine Strawberry White soul is a little, white strawberry variety with red seeds specks. The lovely, sweet, pineapple like, white strawberry can be harvested all summer til the fall. The plants provide you with a prolific amount of strawberries till the first frost.</p> <p>Strawberries are delicious fruits and the flavour is nicest when they are really fresh. You can't get fresher strawberries than fruits from your own garden. These very well-loved, sweet fruits are very easy to grow yourself and very well suited for the cultivation in pots or small gardens for those with limited space. These strawberries are delicious in desserts, with yogurt for breakfast and of course in a delicious fruit salad. Very well liked by bees. Hardy perennial.</p> <div> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> </div> </div> </body> </html>
V 1 W (50 S)
Alpine Strawberry - White Soul Seeds
  • Nové
Sugar Apple, Cherimoya Seeds (Annona cherimola)  - 6

Sugar Apple, Cherimoya...

Cena 4,25 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sugar Apple, Cherimoya Seeds (Annona cherimola)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Also known as Sugar Apple, Chirimoya. Mark Twain once referred to the cherimoya as "the most delicious fruit known to men." Although its flavor is often likened to that of a cross between a banana and a pineapple, the flesh of this exotic fruit has also been described as similar to commercial bubblegum. Although they are native to the Andes, cherimoyas also thrive in Mediterranean climates and have been introduced in Spain, Italy, and California, among other places.</p> <p>Trees are fast-growing, producing fruit from seed in 3-4 years. The cherimoya is subtropical and when full-grown can survive to 25F (USDA: 10a-11). Young trees are susceptible to frost. </p> <p>Note: Due to the origin at altitudes up to 1,900 m, temperatures down to -6 ° C are tolerated.</p> <h2><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></h2> <ul><li>Pretreat: pour hot water over the seeds + soak about 24-48 h</li> <li>Sowing Time: all year round</li> <li>Sowing Depth: 1 cm</li> <li>Sowing Mix: Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</li> <li>Germination temperature: 25 ° C +</li> <li>Location: bright + keep constantly moist not wet</li> <li>Germination Time: about 2-6 weeks</li> </ul>
V 10 AC
Sugar Apple, Cherimoya Seeds (Annona cherimola)  - 6
  • Nové
Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds...

Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds...

Cena 4,00 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Carambola</b>, also known as<span>&nbsp;</span><b>star fruit</b>, is the fruit of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Averrhoa carambola</i>, a species of tree native to tropical<span>&nbsp;</span>Southeast Asia.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-0" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-0" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-Gepts_3-0" class="reference"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The fruit is commonly consumed throughout<span>&nbsp;</span>Southeast Asia, the<span>&nbsp;</span>South Pacific,<span>&nbsp;</span>Micronesia, parts of<span>&nbsp;</span>East Asia, and<span>&nbsp;</span>the Caribbean.<span>&nbsp;</span>The tree is cultivated throughout tropical areas of the world.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>The fruit has distinctive ridges running down its sides (usually 5–6).<span>&nbsp;</span>When cut in cross-section, it resembles a star, giving its name as<span>&nbsp;</span><i>star fruit</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-2" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-2" class="reference"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The entire fruit is edible, usually raw, and may be cooked or made into<span>&nbsp;</span>relishes, preserves,<span>&nbsp;</span>garnish, and juices.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Origins_and_distribution">Origins and distribution</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Carambolas765pt.jpg/220px-Carambolas765pt.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="177" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Carambolas765pt.jpg/330px-Carambolas765pt.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Carambolas765pt.jpg/440px-Carambolas765pt.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2277" data-file-height="1832" title="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Sliced carambolas having 7, 6, and the usual 5 points</div> </div> </div> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span>center of diversity<span>&nbsp;</span>and the original range of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Averrhoa carambola</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is tropical<span>&nbsp;</span>Southeast Asia, where it has been cultivated over centuries.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-4" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Gepts_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Duke_4-0" class="reference">[4]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Arora_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It was introduced to the<span>&nbsp;</span>Indian Subcontinent<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Sri Lanka<span>&nbsp;</span>by<span>&nbsp;</span>Austronesian<span>&nbsp;</span>traders, along with ancient Austronesian<span>&nbsp;</span>cultigens<span>&nbsp;</span>like<span>&nbsp;</span>coconuts,<span>&nbsp;</span>langsat,<span>&nbsp;</span>noni, and<span>&nbsp;</span>santol.<sup id="cite_ref-Blench2009_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>They remain common in those areas and in<span>&nbsp;</span>East Asia<span>&nbsp;</span>and throughout<span>&nbsp;</span>Oceania<span>&nbsp;</span>and the<span>&nbsp;</span>Pacific Islands.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-5" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-3" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>They are cultivated commercially in<span>&nbsp;</span>India, Southeast Asia, southern<span>&nbsp;</span>China,<span>&nbsp;</span>Taiwan, and the southern<span>&nbsp;</span>United States. They are also grown in<span>&nbsp;</span>Central America,<span>&nbsp;</span>South America, the<span>&nbsp;</span>Southwestern United States<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Florida,<span>&nbsp;</span>the Caribbean, and parts of<span>&nbsp;</span>Africa.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-6" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-4" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>They are grown as<span>&nbsp;</span>ornamentals.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-7" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Carambola is considered to be at risk of becoming an<span>&nbsp;</span>invasive species<span>&nbsp;</span>in many world regions.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-5" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p>The carambola tree has a short trunk with many branches, reaching up to 30 feet (9.1&nbsp;m) in height.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-8" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Its deciduous leaves are 6–10 inches (15–25&nbsp;cm) long, with 5 to 11<span>&nbsp;</span>ovate<span>&nbsp;</span>leaflets medium-green in color.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-9" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Flowers are<span>&nbsp;</span>lilac<span>&nbsp;</span>in color, with purple streaks, and are about 0.25 inches (6.4&nbsp;mm) wide.</p> <p>The showy fruits have a thin, waxy<span>&nbsp;</span>pericarp, orange-yellow skin, and crisp, yellow flesh with juice when ripe.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-10" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The fruit is about 5 to 15 centimetres (2 to 6 inches) in length and is an oval shape. It usually has five or six prominent longitudinal ridges.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-11" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In cross section, it resembles a star.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-12" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-6" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The flesh is translucent and light yellow to yellow in color. Each fruit can have 10 to 12 flat light brown seeds about 6 to 13&nbsp;mm (0.25 to 0.5&nbsp;in) in width and enclosed in gelatinous<span>&nbsp;</span>aril. Once removed from the fruit, they lose viability within a few days.<sup id="cite_ref-crfg_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-0" class="reference">[8]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-fi_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup></p> <p>Like the closely related<span>&nbsp;</span>bilimbi, there are two main types of carambola: the small sour (or tart) type and the larger sweet type. The sour varieties have a higher<span>&nbsp;</span>oxalic acid<span>&nbsp;</span>content than the sweet type. A number of cultivars have been developed in recent years. The most common cultivars grown commercially include the sweet types "Arkin" (Florida), "Yang Tao" (Taiwan), "Ma fueng" (Thailand), "Maha" (Malaysia), and "Demak" (Indonesia) and the sour types "Golden Star", "Newcomb", "Star King", and "Thayer" (all from Florida). Some of the sour varieties like "Golden Star" can become sweet if allowed to ripen.<sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Common_names">Common names</span></h3> <p>Carambola is known by many names across its regions of cultivation, including<span>&nbsp;</span><i>balimbing</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in Southeast Asia,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>ma fen</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in China,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>kamaranga</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in India, and<span>&nbsp;</span><i>carambolo</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in Spanish-speaking countries, as examples.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-14" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-7" class="reference">[2]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary">Culinary</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3a/Carambola_Starfruit.jpg/220px-Carambola_Starfruit.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="111" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3a/Carambola_Starfruit.jpg/330px-Carambola_Starfruit.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3a/Carambola_Starfruit.jpg/440px-Carambola_Starfruit.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2578" data-file-height="1300"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Vertical, end view, and cross section of the ripe carambola</div> </div> </div> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Carambola, (star fruit), raw</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100&nbsp;g (3.5&nbsp;oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>128&nbsp;kJ (31&nbsp;kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>6.73 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sugars</th> <td>3.98 g</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>2.8 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>0.33 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>1.04 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin A equiv. <div>lutein<span>&nbsp;</span>zeaxanthin</div> </th> <td> <div>66 μg</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine (B<span>1</span>)</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.014 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin (B<span>2</span>)</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.016 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin (B<span>3</span>)</th> <td> <div>2%</div> 0.367 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid (B<span>5</span>)</th> <td> <div>8%</div> 0.391 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>6</span></th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.017 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate (B<span>9</span>)</th> <td> <div>3%</div> 12 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Choline</th> <td> <div>2%</div> 7.6 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>41%</div> 34.4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin E</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.15 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>0%</div> 3 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.08 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>3%</div> 10 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>2%</div> 0.037 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>2%</div> 12 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>3%</div> 133 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>0%</div> 2 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.12 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Other constituents</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Water</th> <td>91.4 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr> <div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span>&nbsp;</span>micrograms&nbsp;• mg =<span>&nbsp;</span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span>&nbsp;</span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span>&nbsp;</span>US&nbsp;recommendations<span>&nbsp;</span>for adults.<br><span class="nowrap">Source:<span>&nbsp;</span>USDA Nutrient Database</span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The entire fruit is edible, including the slightly waxy skin. The flesh is crunchy, firm, and extremely juicy.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-8" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It does not contain fibers and has a texture similar in consistency to that of<span>&nbsp;</span>grapes. Carambolas are best consumed shortly after they ripen, when they are yellow with a light shade of green or just after all traces of green have disappeared. They will also have brown ridges at the edges and feel firm. Fruits picked while still slightly green will turn yellow in storage at room temperature, but will not increase in sugar content. Overripe carambola will be yellow with brown spots and can become blander in taste and soggier in consistency.<sup id="cite_ref-buzzle_10-0" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>Ripe sweet type carambolas are sweet without being overwhelming as they rarely have more than 4% sugar content. They have a tart, sour undertone, and an oxalic acid odor. The taste is difficult to match, but it has been compared to a mix of<span>&nbsp;</span>apple,<span>&nbsp;</span>pear,<span>&nbsp;</span>grape, and<span>&nbsp;</span>citrus family<span>&nbsp;</span>fruits. Unripe star fruits are firmer and sour, and taste like green apples.<sup id="cite_ref-fg_11-0" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>Ripe carambolas may also be used in cooking. In Southeast Asia, they are usually stewed in<span>&nbsp;</span>cloves<span>&nbsp;</span>and sugar, sometimes with<span>&nbsp;</span>apples. In China, they are cooked with fish. In Australia, they may be cooked as a vegetable, pickled, or made into jams. In<span>&nbsp;</span>Jamaica<span>&nbsp;</span>they are sometimes dried.</p> <p>Unripe and sour type carambolas can be mixed with other chopped spices to make relishes in Australia.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-16" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In the Philippines, unripe carambolas are eaten dipped in<span>&nbsp;</span>rock salt.<span>&nbsp;</span>In Thailand, they are cooked together with shrimp.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-17" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>The juice from carambolas is also used in iced drinks, particularly the juice of the sour varieties. In the Philippines they can be used as seasoning. In India, the juice is bottled for drinking.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrition">Nutrition</span></h3> <p>Raw carambola is 91% water, 7%<span>&nbsp;</span>carbohydrates, 1%<span>&nbsp;</span>protein, and has negligible<span>&nbsp;</span>fat<span>&nbsp;</span>(table). A 100 gram reference amount of raw fruit supplies 31<span>&nbsp;</span>calories<span>&nbsp;</span>and a rich content of<span>&nbsp;</span>vitamin C<span>&nbsp;</span>(41% of the<span>&nbsp;</span>Daily Value), with no other<span>&nbsp;</span>micronutrients<span>&nbsp;</span>in significant content (table).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Health_risks">Health risks</span></h2> <p>Carambolas contain<span>&nbsp;</span>caramboxin<sup id="cite_ref-auto_13-0" class="reference">[13]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>oxalic acid.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-19" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-muthu_14-0" class="reference">[14]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Both substances are harmful to individuals suffering from<span>&nbsp;</span>kidney failure,<span>&nbsp;</span>kidney stones, or those under<span>&nbsp;</span>kidney dialysis<span>&nbsp;</span>treatment.<sup id="cite_ref-muthu_14-1" class="reference">[14]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Consumption by those with kidney failure can produce<span>&nbsp;</span>hiccups, vomiting, nausea, mental confusion, and sometimes death.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Neto2003_16-0" class="reference">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference">[17]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Caramboxin is a<span>&nbsp;</span>neurotoxin<span>&nbsp;</span>which is structurally similar to<span>&nbsp;</span>phenylalanine, and is a<span>&nbsp;</span>glutamatergic<span>&nbsp;</span>agonist.<sup id="cite_ref-auto_13-1" class="reference">[13]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Drug_interactions">Drug interactions</span></h3> <p>Like the<span>&nbsp;</span>grapefruit, carambola is considered to be a potent inhibitor of seven<span>&nbsp;</span>cytochrome P450<span>&nbsp;</span>isoforms.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>These enzymes are significant in the<span>&nbsp;</span>first-pass elimination<span>&nbsp;</span>of many medications, and, thus, the consumption of carambola or its juice in combination with certain prescription medications can significantly increase their effective dosage within the body.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg/220px-Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="146" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg/330px-Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg/440px-Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2048" data-file-height="1360" title="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Unripe Indian carambola</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7d/Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg/220px-Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7d/Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg/330px-Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7d/Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg/440px-Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg 2x" data-file-width="1280" data-file-height="960" title="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Ripe carambola fruit with Indian spices</div> </div> </div> <p>The carambola is a tropical and subtropical fruit which can be grown at elevations up to 1,200 metres (4,000 feet). It prefers full sun exposure, but requires enough humidity and annual rainfall of at least 1,800&nbsp;mm (70&nbsp;in).<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-20" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-9" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It does not have a soil type preference, but will thrive in<span>&nbsp;</span>loam<span>&nbsp;</span>and requires good drainage.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-21" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Moderate irrigation supports its growth during dry seasons.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-22" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Heavy rains may inhibit fruit production.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-23" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>Carambola trees are planted at least 6&nbsp;m (20&nbsp;ft) from each other and typically are fertilized three times a year. The tree grows rapidly and typically produces fruit at four or five years of age. The large amount of rain during spring actually reduces the amount of fruit, but, in ideal conditions, carambola can produce from 90 to 180 kilograms (200 to 400 pounds) of fruit a year. The carambola tree flowers throughout the year, with main fruiting seasons from April to June and October to December in Malaysia,<sup id="cite_ref-ippc_20-0" class="reference">[20]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>for example, but fruiting also occurs at other times in some other locales, such as South Florida.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-24" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-3" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>Growth and leaf responses of container-grown `Arkin' carambola (<i>Averrhoa carambola</i><span>&nbsp;</span>L.) trees to long-term exposure of 25%, 50%, or 100% sunlight showed that shading increased<span>&nbsp;</span>rachis<span>&nbsp;</span>length and leaflet area, decreased leaflet thickness, and produced more horizontal branch orientation.<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup></p> <p>Major pests are<span>&nbsp;</span>carambola fruit flies, fruit moths, ants, and birds.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-25" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-crfg_7-3" class="reference">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-ippc_20-1" class="reference">[20]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Crops are also susceptible to frost.<sup id="cite_ref-crfg_7-4" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>Top producers of carambola in the world market include Australia,<span>&nbsp;</span>Guyana, India,<span>&nbsp;</span>Israel,<span>&nbsp;</span>Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan, and the United States.<sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-4" class="reference">[8]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Malaysia is a global leader in star fruit production by volume and ships the product widely to Asia and Europe.<sup id="cite_ref-ippc_20-2" class="reference">[20]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Due to concerns over pests and pathogens, however, whole star fruits cannot yet be imported to the US from Malaysia under current<span>&nbsp;</span>United States Department of Agriculture<span>&nbsp;</span>regulations. In the United States, carambolas are grown in tropical and semitropical areas, including Texas, South Carolina, Louisiana, California, Virginia, Florida and Hawaii.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-26" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-bilj_22-0" class="reference">[22]</sup></p> <p>In the United States, commercial cultivation and broad consumer acceptance of the fruit only dates to the 1970s, attributable to<span>&nbsp;</span>Morris Arkin, a backyard<span>&nbsp;</span>horticulturalist, in<span>&nbsp;</span>Coral Gables, Florida. The 'Arkin' variety represented 98% of the acreage in South Florida in the early 21st century.<sup id="cite_ref-knight_23-0" class="reference">[23]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Other_uses">Other uses</span></h2> <p>The trees are also grown as ornamentals for their abundant brightly colored and unusually shaped fruits, as well as for their attractive dark green leaves and their lavender to pink flowers.<sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-5" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>Like the<span>&nbsp;</span>bilimbi, the juice of the more acidic sour types can be used to clean<span>&nbsp;</span>rusty<span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span>tarnished<span>&nbsp;</span>metal (especially<span>&nbsp;</span>brass) as well as bleach rust stains from cloth. They may also be used as a<span>&nbsp;</span>mordant<span>&nbsp;</span>in<span>&nbsp;</span>dyeing.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
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Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)
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Dragon Fruit Yellow Seeds - Pitaya, Pitahaya Fruit

Yellow Pitaya, Yellow...

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<h2 style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: #333333;"><strong>Yellow Pitaya, Yellow Dragon Fruit Seeds</strong></h2> <h2 style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: #333333;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: #333333;">DRAGON FRUIT. &nbsp; Truly one of God's wonders! Pitaya Fruit, Pitahaya Fruit or commonly known as the Dragon fruit is among the most nutritious and wonderful exotic fruits. It is a favorite to many, particularly people of Asian origin. It features a mouth-watering light sweet taste, an intense shape and color, not forgetting its outstanding flowers. In addition to being tasty and refreshing, this beautiful fruit boasts of a lot of water and other vital minerals with varied nutritional ingredients.</p> <div> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Round, often red colored fruit with prominent scales. The thin rind encloses the large mass of sweetly flavored white or red pulp and small black seeds. Dragon fruits have fleshy stems reaching from a few inches up to 20ft long (in mature plants). &nbsp;Flowers are ornate and beautiful, and many related species are propagated as ornamentals. Pitahaya plants can have up to 4-6 fruiting cycles per year.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Family: Cactaceae family</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Origin: Mexico and South America</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit plant is a night flowering vine-like cactus, the beautiful yellowish flower is about 1 foot long and 9 inches wide, bell shaped and very fragrant, they open during the early evening and wilt by daybreak. The fruit is oblong and has unique appearance because of its bright pink to red, green tipped overlapping scales rind. The edible portion is white or red, with hundreds of tiny black seeds. Its taste is sweet and juicy similar to that of pear, kiwi and watermelon. Dragon fruit is now grown commercially in Asia in places like Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Health Benefits:</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit help to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit prevent formation of cancer causing free radicals.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit helps moisturize and smoothen skin and decrease bad cholesterol level.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit helps improve appetite.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit can enhance the body metabolism because of its protein content.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit helps improve digestion and reduce fat.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit helps maintain the health of the eyes.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit helps strengthen the bones and teeth.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit helps in tissue development.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit promotes healing of cuts and bruise.</p> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;">Dragon fruit helps improve memory.</p> <div style="color: #000000; font-family: Montserrat, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: #f9f9f9;"> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Sowing Instructions</span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Propagation:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Pretreat:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Stratification:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Sowing Time:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Sowing Depth:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">Light germinator! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Sowing Mix:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Germination temperature:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">&nbsp;about 25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Location:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Germination Time:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">&nbsp;2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">Watering:</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="font-weight: 600;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="margin-bottom: 1rem;"><br><span style="color: #008000;">Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
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Dragon Fruit Yellow Seeds - Pitaya, Pitahaya Fruit
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