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Semena květin

Počet produktů: 168

Zobrazení 1-12 z 168 položek
Bladder cherry Seeds, Chinese lantern 1.55 - 7

Bladder cherry Seeds,...

Cena 1,55 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Bladder cherry Seeds, Chinese lantern (Physalis alkekengi)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Physalis alkekengi (bladder cherry, Chinese lantern, Japanese-lantern, or winter cherry, Japanese: hōzuki) is a relative of P. peruviana (Cape gooseberry), easily identifiable by the larger, bright orange to red papery covering over its fruit, which resemble paper lanterns. It is native from southern Europe east across southern Asia to Japan. It is an herbaceous perennial plant growing to 40–60 cm tall, with spirally arranged leaves 6–12 cm long and 4–9 cm broad. The flowers are white, with a five-lobed corolla 10–15 mm across, with an inflated basal calyx which matures into the papery orange fruit covering, 4–5 cm long and broad.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Physalis alkekengi, or the Chinese lantern, dries during spring. Once it is dried, the bright red fruit is seen.</p> <p>It is a popular ornamental plant, though it can be invasive with its wide-spreading root system sending up new shoots some distance from where it was originally planted. In various places around the world, it has escaped cultivation.[4] It has food and medicinal uses.</p> <p><strong>Traditional uses</strong></p> <p>The dried fruit of P. alkekengi is called the golden flower in the Unani system of medicine, and used as a diuretic, antiseptic, liver corrective, and sedative.</p> <p><strong>Chemical constituents</strong></p> <p>Like a number of other species in the genus Physalis, it contains a wide variety of physalins. When isolated from the plant, these have antibacterial and leishmanicidal activities in vitro.</p> <p>It also contains caffeic acid ethyl ester, 25,27-dehydro-physalin L, physalin D, and cuneataside E.</p> <p><strong>Cultural significance</strong></p> <p>In Japan, its seeds are used as part of the Bon Festival as offerings to guide the souls of the deceased. Also, an annual market is dedicated to the flower called hōzuki-ichi which occurs in Asakusa around Sensō-ji every year on July 9 and 10.</p> </body> </html>
F 59
Bladder cherry Seeds, Chinese lantern 1.55 - 7
  • Nové
Brown-eyed Susan Seeds medicinal herb 1.55 - 7

Brown-eyed Susan Seeds...

Cena 1,55 €
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Brown-eyed Susan Seeds medicinal herb (Rudbeckia hirta)</strong></span><br /><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Rudbeckia hirta, commonly called black-eyed Susan, is a species of flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, native to the Eastern and Central United States. It is one of a number of plants with the common name black-eyed Susan. Other common names for this plant include: brown-eyed Susan, brown Betty, gloriosa daisy, golden Jerusalem, Poorland daisy, yellow daisy, and yellow ox-eye daisy.</p> <p>It is the state flower of Maryland.</p> <p>The plant also is a traditional Native American medicinal herb in several tribal nations; believed in those cultures to be a remedy, among other things, for colds, flu, infection, swelling and (topically, by poultice) for snake bite (although not all parts of the plant are edible)</p> <p>Parts of the plant have nutritional value. Other parts are not edible.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>It is an upright annual (sometimes biennial or perennial) growing 30–100 cm (12–39 in) tall by 30–45 cm (12–18 in) wide. It has alternate, mostly basal leaves 10–18 cm long, covered by coarse hair, with stout branching stems and daisy-like, composite flowers appearing in late summer and early autumn. In the species, the flowers are up to 10 cm (4 in) in diameter, with yellow ray-florets circling conspicuous brown or black, dome-shaped disc-florets.[6] However, extensive breeding has produced a range of sizes and colours, including oranges, reds and browns.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The genus name honors Olaus Rudbeck, who was a professor of botany at the University of Uppsala in Sweden and was one of Linnaeus's teachers. The specific epithet refers to the trichomes (hairs) occurring on leaves and stems.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>R. hirta is widely cultivated in parks and gardens, for summer bedding schemes, borders, containers, wildflower gardens, prairie-style plantings and cut flowers. Numerous cultivars have been developed, of which 'Indian Summer' and 'Toto' have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit. Other popular cultivars include 'Double Gold' and 'Marmalade'.</p> <p>Gloriosa daisies are tetraploid cultivars having much larger flowers than the species, often doubled or with contrasting markings on the petals. They were first bred by Alfred Blakeslee of Smith College by applying colchicine to R. hirta seeds; Blakeslee's stock was further developed by W. Atlee Burpee and introduced to commerce at the 1957 Philadelphia Flower Show. Gloriosa daisies are generally treated as annuals or short-lived perennials and are typically grown from seed, though there are some named cultivars.</p> <p><strong><em>USES</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Traditional Native American medicinal uses</strong></p> <p>    The roots but not the seedheads of Rudbeckia hirta can be used much like the related Echinacea purpurea to boost immunity and fight colds, flu and infections.</p> <p>    It is also an astringent when used in a warm infusion as a wash for sores and swellings.</p> <p>    The Ojibwa people used it as a poultice for snake bites and to make an infusion for treating colds and worms in children.</p> <p>    The plant is also diuretic and was used by the Menominee and Potawatomi peoples.</p> <p>    Juice from the roots has been used as drops for earaches.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional parts</strong></p> <p>    Certain parts of the plant contains anthocyanins a class of antioxidant with several known health benefits.</p> <p><strong>Cautions</strong></p> <p>    As with any wild plant, it is usually recommended to research carefully before consuming as not all parts of the plant may be edible and to avoid mis-identification with other plants that may look similar to the Black eyed Susan.</p> <p>    It is widely recommended to always consult one's Doctor before taking any medicinal herb.</p> <p>    With any herb approved by a Doctor for use, it is widely agreed that recommended dosages and preparation procedures should always be followed.</p> <p>    The species is also known to be toxic to cats when ingested.</p> </div>
F 53
Brown-eyed Susan Seeds medicinal herb 1.55 - 7
  • Nové

This plant is edible
Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or...

Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or...

Cena 2,00 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy Seeds (Bellis perennis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Bellis perennis is a common European species of daisy, of the Asteraceae family, often considered the archetypal species of that name. Many related plants also share the name "daisy", so to distinguish this species from other daisies it is sometimes qualified as common daisy, lawn daisy or English daisy. Historically, it has also been commonly known as bruisewort and occasionally woundwort (although the common name woundwort is now more closely associated with Stachys (woundworts)). Bellis perennis is native to western, central and northern Europe, but widely naturalized in most temperate regions including the Americas and Australasia.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>It is an herbaceous perennial plant with short creeping rhizomes and rosettes of small rounded or spoon-shaped leaves that are from 3/4 to 2 inches (approx. 2–5 cm) long and grows flat to the ground. The species habitually colonizes lawns, and is difficult to eradicate by mowing - hence the term 'lawn daisy'. Wherever it appears it is often considered an invasive weed.[4]</p> <p>The flowerheads are composite, in the form of a pseudanthium, consisting of many sessile flowers about 3/4 to 1-1/4 in (approx. 2–3 cm) in diameter, with white ray florets (often tipped red) and yellow disc florets. Each inflorescence is borne on single leafless stems 3/4 - 4 in (approx. 2–10 cm), rarely 6 in (approx. 15 cm) tall. The capitulum, or disc of florets, is surrounded by two rows of green bracts known as "phyllaries".</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>B. perennis generally blooms from early to midsummer, although when grown under ideal conditions, they have a very long flowering season and will even produce a few flowers in the middle of mild winters.</p> <p>It can generally be grown in USDA Zones 4 - 8 (i.e. where minimum temperatures are above −30 °F (−34 °C)) in full sun to partial shade conditions, and requires low or no maintenance. It has no known serious insect or disease problems and can generally be grown in most well-drained soils. The plant may be propagated either by seed after the last frost, or by division after flowering.</p> <p>Though invasive, the species is still considered a valuable ground cover in certain garden settings (e.g., as part of English or cottage-inspired gardens, as well as spring meadows where low growth and some color is desired in parallel with minimal care and maintenance while helping to crowd out noxious weeds once established and naturalized).</p> <p>Numerous single- and double-flowered varieties are in cultivation, producing flat or spherical blooms in a range of sizes (1 cm to 6 cm) and colors (red, pink &amp; white). They are generally grown from seed as biennial bedding plants. They can also be purchased as plugs in Spring. The cultivar 'Tasso series' has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>Bellis is Latin for "pretty" and perennis is Latin for "everlasting".</p> <p>The name "daisy" is considered a corruption of "day's eye", because the whole head closes at night and opens in the morning. Chaucer called it "eye of the day". In Medieval times, bellis perennis or the English Daisy was commonly known as "Mary's Rose".[10]</p> <p>The English Daisy is also considered to be a flower of children and innocence.</p> <p>Daisy is used as a girl's name and as a nickname for girls named Margaret, after the French name for the oxeye daisy, marguerite.</p> <p><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Culinary</strong></p> <p>This daisy may be used as a potherb. Young leaves can be eaten raw in salads or cooked, noting that the leaves become increasingly astringent with age. Flower buds and petals can be eaten raw in sandwiches, soups, and salads. It is also used as a tea and as a vitamin supplement.</p> <p><strong>Herbal medicine</strong></p> <p>Bellis perennis has astringent properties and has been used in herbal medicine.[13] In ancient Rome, the surgeons who accompanied Roman legions into battle would order their slaves to pick sacks full of daisies in order to extract their juice, hence the origin of this plant's scientific name in Latin. Bandages were soaked in this juice and would then be used to bind sword and spear cuts.</p> <p>Bellis perennis is still used in homeopathy for wounds and after certain surgical procedures, as well as for blunt trauma in animals. Typically, the plant is harvested while in flower when intended for use in homeopathy.</p> <p>Bellis perennis flowers have been used in the traditional Austrian medicine internally as tea (or the leaves as a salad) for treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tract.</p> <p><strong>Other uses</strong></p> <p>Daisies have traditionally been used for making daisy chains in children's games.</p> </body> </html>
F 51
Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy Seeds
  • Nové
Bells of Ireland Seeds (Moluccella laevis) 1.75 - 4

Bells of Ireland Seeds...

Cena 1,75 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Bells of Ireland Seeds (Moluccella laevis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Bells of Ireland are flowers to please anyone who loves flower arranging. Cut fresh, the bells will last for years and they are very useful for winter arrangements but they also look good in flower borders and with the recent fashion for green blooms are becoming more sort after.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">The papery 2 to 5cm (¾ to 1¼in) bells are densely packed along most of the length of the square stems that can reach up to 90cm (3in). The white flowers are relatively small and inconspicuous but the green, bell-shaped calyx surrounding each bloom is large and showy.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">The bells are as wide as your thumb and crowd their way up the entire stem. The large white seeds are produced at the bottom of the calyx, looking somewhat like chicken eggs in a nest, it is sometimes called Shell flower. Moluccella look good when combined with other colourful annual flowers in the border or cutting bed. </span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">They also do well in containers, offering a vertical component. </span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">The light green colour complements any white flowers or purple-leaved plants and can be used in monochromatic schemes with other green-flowered plants. They even look interesting late in the season when the old spikes become dry and bleached (if they haven't been pruned out to encourage new growth).</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Moluccella has been cultivated since 1570; the flowers are a symbol of good luck. Both the flowers and rounded, pale green leaves with slightly scalloped edges have a distinctive lemon/vanilla scent. </span></p> <h2><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Sowing: </span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Sow indoors in Spring To hasten germination, prechill the seeds for 5 days. </span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Place the seeds in a moistened piece of kitchen roll and place in the fridge for 5 days. </span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Sow seed on the surface of lightly firmed well drained seed compost in pots or trays. "Just cover" the seed with a light sprinkling of compost or vermiculite, do not exclude light as this helps germination. </span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Keep at a temperature at around 15 to 20°C (59 to 68°F). After sowing, keep the surface of the compost moist but not waterlogged; germination can take between 21 to 35 days.When large enough to handle, transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3in) pots or trays and grow on. </span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Gradually acclimatise to outdoor conditions for 10 to 15 days before planting out after all risk of frost, 22 to 30cm (9 to 12in) apart. </span></p> <h2><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Cultivation: </span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">For best results site in a well drained position in full sun. The flowers take around 90 to 100 days from seed to bloom. The stems should not need staking unless the area is exposed and subject to high winds. </span></p> <h2><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Cut Flowers:</span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">This is a fast-growing border plant with unusual qualities including an ability to survive for months as a cut flower. To use for fresh arrangements, harvest the flower heads at their peak of blooming. The stems are hollow making them difficult to use with Oasis foam. Professional florists insert a wired stake into the hollow stem for use in foam.</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Display in a cool, shaded area and kept supplied with fresh water, they will remain fresh for 7 to 10 days. Re-cut 12mm (½in) from the base of each Bells of Ireland stem under water using a sharp knife with each water change to extend the life of the blooms. Remove any foliage that may become submerged after re-cutting to avoid bacterial growth.</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Adding a commercial floral preservative to the vase will help to prevent bacteria growth and feeds your flowers insuring a longer vase life. To make your own cut flower food, mix half a teaspoon of table sugar to a quart of cold water and mix thoroughly.</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Bells of Ireland turn a lovely straw colour when dried. Harvest the flowers in dry weather at the end of the summer. Hang upside down in a dry area, making sure that there is enough ventilation between the flowers, so that they dry evenly.</span></p> <h2><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Plant Uses:</span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Flower Arranging, Flowers Borders and Beds, Cottage / Informal Gardens. Architectural Planting. Wildflower Gardens or Wildlife Gardens Origin: Despite its name, Bells of Ireland is actually a native of Syria and Turkey.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Nomenclature: Moluccella is said to be named for the Molucca Islands of Indonesia. It may have been mistakenly thought of to be the origin of this plant. It is presumed to be from an Arabic word meaning "King" or a diminutive of Molucca."</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">The species name laevis means smooth, free from hairs or roughness.</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">They get the name Bells of Ireland because of their fantastic green colour</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Flowers: Green bracts in late summer</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Foliage: Grown for herbaceous foliage, good autumn colour</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Height: 60 to 75cm (24 to 30in)</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Spread: 22 to 30cm (9 to 12in)</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Soil type: Moist but Well-drained</span><br /><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Exposure: Full Sun.</span></p>
F 15
Bells of Ireland Seeds (Moluccella laevis) 1.75 - 4
  • Nové
Birthworts, Pipevines, Dutchman's Pipes Seeds 2.45 - 10

Birthworts, Pipevines,...

Cena 2,45 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Birthworts, Pipevines, Dutchman's Pipes Seeds (Aristolochia)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</span></strong></span></h2> <p>Aristolochia is a large plant genus with over 500 species that is the namesake (type genus) of the family (Aristolochiaceae). Its members are commonly known as birthworts, pipevines or Dutchman's pipes and are widespread and occur in the most diverse climates. Some species, like A. utriformis and A. westlandii, are threatened with extinction.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Aristolochia is a genus of evergreen and deciduous woody vines and herbaceous perennials. The smooth stem is erect or somewhat twining. The simple leaves are alternate and cordate, membranous, growing on leaf stalks. There are no stipules.</p> <p>The flowers grow in the leaf axils. They are inflated and globose at the base, continuing as a long perianth tube, ending in a tongue-shaped, brightly colored lobe. There is no corolla. The calyx is one to three whorled, and three to six toothed. The sepals are united (gamosepalous). There are six to 40 stamens in one whorl. They are united with the style, forming a gynostemium. The ovary is inferior and is four to six locular.</p> <p>These flowers have a specialized pollination mechanism. The plants are aromatic and their strong scent[2] attracts insects. The inner part of the perianth tube is covered with hairs, acting as a fly-trap. These hairs then wither to release the fly, covered with pollen.</p> <p><strong>The fruit is dehiscent capsule with many endospermic seeds.</strong></p> <p>The common names "Dutchman's pipe" and "pipevine" (e.g. common pipevine, A. durior) are an allusion to old-fashioned meerschaum pipes at one time common in the Netherlands and northern Germany. "Birthwort" (e.g. European birthwort A. clematitis) refers to these species' flower shape, resembling a birth canal. Some reference books[3][4] state that the scientific name Aristolochia was developed from Ancient Greek aristos (άριστος) "best" + locheia (λοχεία), "childbirth" or "childbed," but according to an ancient tradition recorded in the first century BCE by Cicero the plant was named for the otherwise unknown individual with the common Greek name Aristolochos, who had learned from a dream that it was an antidote for snake bites.</p> <p>As of 2013, it has been confirmed that naturally occurring carcinogenic compounds have been found in plants within the genus Aristolochia.</p> <p><strong>Herbalism, toxicity and carcinogenicity</strong></p> <p>The species Aristalochia clematitis was highly regarded as a medicinal plant since the ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans, and on to until the Early Modern era; it also plays a role in traditional Chinese medicine. Due to its resemblance to the uterus, the doctrine of signatures held that "birthwort" was useful in childbirth. A preparation was given to women upon delivery to expel the placenta, as noted by the herbalist Dioscurides in the first century CE. Despite its presence in ancient medicine, Aristolochia is known to contain the lethal toxin aristolochic acid. Aristolochic acid was linked to aristolochic acid-associated urothelial cancer in a Taiwanese study in 2012.[7] In 2013, two studies reported that aristolochic acid is a strong carcinogen. Whole-genome and exome analysis of individuals with a known exposure to aristolochic acid revealed a higher rate of somatic mutation in DNA.</p> <p>The Bencao Gangmu, compiled by Li Shi-Zhen in the latter part of the sixteenth century, was based on the author’s experience and on data obtained from earlier herbals; this Chinese herbal classic describes 1892 "drugs" (with 1110 drawings), including many species of Aristolochia.[10] For 400 years, the Bencao Gangmu remained the principal source of information in traditional Chinese medicine and the work was translated into numerous languages, reflecting its influence in countries other than China. In the mid-twentieth century, the Bencao Gangmu was replaced by modern Materia Medica, the most comprehensive source being Zhong Hua Ben Cao (Encyclopedia of Chinese Materia Medica), published in 1999.[11] The Encyclopedia lists 23 species of Aristolochia, though with little mention of toxicity. The Chinese government currently lists the following Aristolochia herbs: A. manshuriensis (stems), A. fangchi (root), A. debilis (root and fruit), and A. contorta ( fruit), two of which (mou dou ling and quingmuxiang) appear in the 2005 Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China.</p> <p>In traditional Chinese medicine Aristolochia species are used for certain forms of acute arthritis and edema.  In 1993, a series of end-stage renal disease cases was reported[13][15] from Belgium associated with a weight loss treatment, where Stephania tetrandra in a herbal preparation was suspected of being substituted with Aristolochia fangchi.[16][17] More than 105 patients were identified with nephropathy following the ingestion of this preparation from the same clinic from 1990 to 1992. Many required renal transplantation or dialysis.</p> <p>Aristolochia has been shown to be both a potent carcinogen and kidney toxin. Herbal compounds containing Aristolochia are classified as a Group 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer.[19] Epidemiological and laboratory studies have identified Aristolochia to be a dangerous kidney toxin; Aristolochia has been shown associated with more than 100 cases of kidney failure.[20] Furthermore, it appears as if contamination of grain with European birthwort (A. clematitis) is a cause of Balkan nephropathy, a severe renal disease occurring in parts of southeast Europe.</p> <p>Despite the toxic properties of aristolochic acid, naturopaths claim that a decoction of birthwort stimulates the production and increases the activity of white blood cells, or that pipevines contain a disinfectant which assists in wound healing. Also, Aristolochia bracteolata is colloquially known as "worm killer" due to supposed antihelminthic activity.</p> <p>Aristolochia taxa have also been used as reptile repellents. A. serpentaria (Virginia snakeroot) is thus named because the root was used to treat snakebite, as "so offensive to these reptiles, that they not only avoid the places where it grows, but even flee from the traveler who carries a piece of it in his hand".[22] A. pfeiferi, A. rugosa, and A. trilobata are also used in folk medicine to cure snakebites.</p> <p><strong>Garden history</strong></p> <p>Due to their spectacular flowers, several species are used as ornamental plants, notably the hardy A. durior of eastern North America, which was one of John Bartram's many introductions to British gardens; in 1761 Bartram sent seeds he had collected in the Ohio River Valley to Peter Collinson in London, and Collinson gave them to the nurseryman James Gordon at Mile End to raise. The vine was soon adopted for creating for arbors "a canopy impenetrable to the rays of the sun, or moderate rain," as Dr John Sims noted in The Botanical Magazine, 1801.</p> <h2 class="entry-title post-title">Growing A Dutchman’s Pipe From Seeds</h2> <p><span>Once the seeds are soaked for 48 hours, plant them in a moistened mixture of 1 part perlite to 5 parts potting soil. Plant two seeds about ½ inch apart in a 4-inch pot. Press them lightly into the soil surface. Move the pots with the Dutchman’s pipe seeds into a room with plenty of sunlight. Cover the pot with plastic wrap and use a propagation mat to warm the containers, roughly 75 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit (23 to 29 C.). You’ll need to check the soil daily to see if it is dry. Whenever the surface feels barely damp, give the pot an inch of water with a spray bottle. Once you have planted the Dutchman’s pipe seeds and given them appropriate water, you have to be patient. Starting Dutchman’s pipe from seeds takes time. You might see the first sprouts in a month. More can grow over the following two months. Once seeds in a pot sprout, move it out of the direct sun and remove the propagation mat. If both seeds sprout in one pot, remove the weaker one. Allow the stronger seedling to grow in an area of light shade all summer. In autumn, the seedling will be ready for transplant.</span></p>
F 28
Birthworts, Pipevines, Dutchman's Pipes Seeds 2.45 - 10
  • Nové
Semena Nestařec americký...

Semena Nestařec americký...

Cena 2,35 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Semena Nestařec americký (Ageratum houstonianum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Cena za balení 2000+ semen (0,3 g).</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Nestařec americký</b><span> </span>(<i>Ageratum houstonianum</i><span> </span>Mill) pochází ze<span> </span>Severní<span> </span>i<span> </span>Jižní Ameriky, kde je<span> </span>víceletý. V<span> </span>Česku<span> </span>je jeho život venku omezen na období od posledních<span> </span>jarních<span> </span>do prvních<span> </span>podzimních<span> </span>mrazíků. Zahradnicky je velmi cenný a<span> </span>remontuje<span> </span>(opakovaně kvete) po celé léto. Nové chomáčky<span> </span>květenství<span> </span>překrývají odkvetlé, takže<span> </span>rostlina<span> </span>je stále barevně svěží.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Původ_a_rozšíření">Původ a rozšíření</span></h2> <p>Rod pochází z<span> </span>Peru<span> </span>a<span> </span>Mexika, v našich podmínkách představuje zástupce nepravých<span> </span>letniček.</p> <h2><span id="Vzhled_a_rozmno.C5.BEov.C3.A1n.C3.AD"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Vzhled_a_rozmnožování">Vzhled a rozmnožování</span></h2> <p>Je to kompaktní<span> </span>keřovitá<span> </span>rostlina (25×30<span> </span>cm) s hustšími, vejčitými, sytě zelenými<span> </span>listy.<span> </span>Okolíky<span> </span>fialově modrých květenství dosahují 6-8 cm v<span> </span>průměru. Má vysoký a nízký vzrůstový typ. Nízký se hodí k záhonovým výsadbám nejrůznějších stylů. Pro<span> </span>ornamentální<span> </span>výsadby se dříve používaly rostliny vypěstované ze zelených řízků. Dnes se stále více uplatňují<span> </span>kultivary<span> </span>vyrovnané ve všech znacích i při množení semenem. Takový je např. kultivar 'Tetra Blue Mink'; je poněkud robustnější a má větší květenství v Česku starší kultivary 'Modrá hvězda' nebo bílý 'Little Dorrit'.</p> <p>Modře kvetoucí kultivar je výborným komponentem téměř ke všem záhonovým letničkám. S čistými barvami např. červené<span> </span>šalvěje<span> </span>(Salvia splendens, žlutých<span> </span>aksamitníků<span> </span>(Tagetes), bílého<span> </span>štěničníku<span> </span>(Iberis) dává výrazné barevné efekty. Jako doplněk k pestrobarevným směsím působí zklidňujícím dojmem. Vysoký kultivar 'Bukett' je méně rozšířen, hodí se však dobře k řezu, zvláště jako doplněk. Sazenice z únorového výsevu se zaštipují, aby se koncem května vysadily již urostlé rostliny s prvními květy.</p> </body> </html>
F 11
Semena Nestařec americký (Ageratum houstonianum)
  • Nové
Canterbury Bells, Bell Flower Seed

Canterbury Bells, Bell...

Cena 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Canterbury Bells, Bell Flower Seed (Campanula medium)</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 1500 seeds (0,4g).</strong></span></h3> <p>Canterbury bells plant (Campanula medium) is a popular biennial (perennial in some areas) garden plant reaching about two feet or slightly more. Campanula Canterbury bells can be easily grown and cared for much like their bellflower counterparts. Growing Canterbury bells in your garden can add grace and elegance.</p> <h3><strong>How to Grow Canterbury Bells</strong></h3> <p>The Canterbury bells plant is hardy throughout USDA plant hardiness zones 4-10. It thrives in full sun to partial shade and appreciates moist, well-draining soil and reasonably cool temperatures. Therefore, if you live in a relatively hot climate, provide plenty of afternoon shade.</p> <p>Like most bellflower plants, Canterbury bells are easily propagated by seeds. These should be started in late spring or early summer, thinning as needed once seedlings become large enough. You need only minimal covering with soil. Simply sprinkle seeds in the garden bed and allow nature to do the rest (of course, you will need to keep the area watered).</p> <p>Mature plants will self-seed readily, but just in case, you may want to keep some newly started plants in another nursery bed or pots for transplanting later, usually in spring.</p> <h3><strong>Caring for Campanula Canterbury Bells</strong></h3> <p>During the first year, you should expect only a low-growing clump or rosette of green leaves. These can be overwintered beneath a thick layer of mulch. Look out for slugs or snails, as they enjoy munching on the foliage.</p> <p>By the second year, Canterbury bells flowers will form, usually in summer, atop tall, upright stems. In fact, they may even require staking to keep them upright. Alternatively, you can plant them near shrubby plants for additional support.</p> <p>Canterbury bells also make excellent cut flowers. The large, showy flowers appear as dangling bells (hence the name), which eventually open up into cup-shaped blooms. Flower color can range from white to pink, blue, or purple.</p> <p>Deadheading can sometimes encourage re-blooming as well as maintain appearances. It’s also a good way to save seeds for new additions. It’s always a good idea, however, to leave some flowers intact to self-seed as well. This way you double your chances of growing Canterbury bells year after year.</p> </div>
F 58
Canterbury Bells, Bell Flower Seed
  • Nové
Celosia argentea Seeds Mix

Celosia argentea Seeds Mix

Cena 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Celosia argentea Seeds Mix</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 600+ seeds (0,5g).</strong></span></h3> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Is a tender annual that is often grown in gardens. It is propagated by seeds. The seeds are extremely small, up to 43,000 seeds per ounce. <span style="line-height:1.5em;">The Century cultivars are usually taller (1–2 feet), and are bright red, yellow, orange, or pink. The Kimono cultivars are generally smaller (4 inches - 1 foot), and have more muted colors, though similar to the Century cultivars. Other colors, such as white, burgundy, orange-red, etc., can be found. Certain varieties will grow to 3–4 feet in height.</span></span></div> </div>
F 31
Celosia argentea Seeds Mix
  • Nové
China Aster Seeds

China Aster Seeds

Cena 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>China Aster Seeds</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 260 seeds (0,5g).</strong></span></h3> <div>Half Hardy Annual  <span style="line-height:1.5em;">Flowers: Deep Blue blooms in late June to October </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Height: 25cm (10in) </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Soil type: Rich, well draining soil </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Exposure: Full sun preferred </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Germinates: 7 to 14 days at 16 to 18°C (60 to 64°F) </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Aster “Milady” is the world’s leading Dwarf Aster, with large 8cm (3in) deep blue chrysanthemum-type blooms. </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">This a wonderful dwarf aster grows to just 25cm (10in), the plants have sturdy stems and a well branched habit. Their compact size makes them ideal for borders and bedding schemes as well as container gardening.  </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Milady is a wilt-resistant variety which produces masses of perfect blooms whatever the weather. This very heat resistant and virtually worry free variety will produce non-stop blooms from summer to the first hard frost in autumn. </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">The flowers, which resemble powder puffs are butterfly magnets. They are ideal for tubs, troughs and window boxes, and as pot-plants. Don’t forget to bring a few flowers inside as they are also excellent for cutting.</span></div> <div>Aster “Milady Deep Blue" has been awarded the RHS 'Award of Garden Merit'.</div> <div> <p>The "Milady" series contains five colourways and a mixed colour pack - Rose, Scarlet, Deep Blue, Lilac, White and Mixed Colours</p> </div> <h3><strong>Sowing:</strong></h3> <div>Sow indoors 6 to 8 weeks before the last frost date, or sow directly where they are to flower once the soil has warmed. For a continuous show, you may wish to plant stagger the sowing dates. The seed may also be direct sown in April to May where the plants are to flower, but in this case flowering will start later. A sunny situation should be chosen for the aster bed, which should be prepared as soon as possible, making sure that drainage is good.</div> <div>Sowing Indoors  March to April</div> <div>March and April sowing should be made in gentle heat, sowing into trays of compost, “Just cover” the seeds with a sprinkling of compost or vermiculite.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3in) pots or trays. Handle the plants with care and avoid disturbing the roots as much as possible when transplanting to prevent wilting.</div> <div>Gradually hardened off for 10 to 14 days before transplanting into the flowering site in early May. Light spring frosts will not harm the plants.</div> <div>Plant 25 -40cm (10 to 16in) apart.</div> <div>Direct Sowing   April to May</div> <div>Sow thinly, 6mm (1/4in) deep in small clumps or shallow drills. Sow 30cm (12in) apart in well-cultivated soil which has been raked to a fine tilth. Water ground regularly, especially in dry periods.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, thin out seedlings until they are finally 30cm (12in) apart in spring</div> <div> <p>Outside sowings should be gradually thinned to the same spacings when the seedlings are large enough to handle.</p> </div> <h3>Cultivation:</h3> <div>Flowers should be removed as soon as they have faded to promote the growth of further blooms. Never over water, but do not let the soil dry out. <span style="line-height:1.5em;">Preventive measures should be taken against aphids </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Cut flowers will last 8 to 10 days in water. Cut when flowers are half-open; recut stems underwater. </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Plant Uses:  </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Cut Flowers, Flowers Borders and Beds, Patio and Container Plants.</span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Note: </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Plants must not be planted in the same ground two years in a row to avoid Fusarium Wilt - a soil-borne disease that has plagued Asters in the past. </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Nomenclature: </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">The name Aster comes from the Ancient Greek word astron, meaning "star", arriving through the Latin word astrum with the same meaning, referring to the shape of the flower head. </span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">the genus name Callistephus (pronounced ka-LIS-te-fus) is derived from the Greek words “kallos” (meaning beautiful) and “stephanus” (meaning crown).</span></div> </div>
F 21
China Aster Seeds
  • Pouze online
  • Nové
Chinese Aster Blue 1.95 - 4

Chinese Aster Blue

Cena 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Chinese Aster Blue (Callistephus Aster)</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 260 seeds (0,5g).</span></strong></span></h3> <div><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Gremlin is a tall double variety of aster which makes excellent, long lasting cut flowers grown from flower seeds. Sow these flower seeds in well-drained soil in a sunny spot. This dark violet aster has twisted petals which are said to resemble a "tiger's paw" and is often referred to as Tiger Paw Aster or Krallenaster. The Gremlin aster is an extremely late cut flower with huge flowers with curved and quilled petals. This aster, when grown from flower seed, has an upright growth habit reaching nearly 30 inches in height.</span></div> <div>Sowing:</div> <div>Sow indoors 6 to 8 weeks before the last frost date, or sow directly where they are to flower once the soil has warmed. For a continuous show, you may wish to plant stagger the sowing dates. The seed may also be direct sown in April to May where the plants are to flower, but in this case flowering will start later. A sunny situation should be chosen for the aster bed, which should be prepared as soon as possible, making sure that drainage is good.</div> <div>Sowing Indoors  March to April</div> <div>March and April sowing should be made in gentle heat, sowing into trays of compost, “Just cover” the seeds with a sprinkling of compost or vermiculite.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3in) pots or trays. Handle the plants with care and avoid disturbing the roots as much as possible when transplanting to prevent wilting.</div> <div>Gradually hardened off for 10 to 14 days before transplanting into the flowering site in early May. Light spring frosts will not harm the plants.</div> <div>Plant 25 -40cm (10 to 16in) apart.</div> <div>Direct Sowing   April to May</div> <div>Sow thinly, 6mm (1/4in) deep in small clumps or shallow drills. Sow 30cm (12in) apart in well-cultivated soil which has been raked to a fine tilth. Water ground regularly, especially in dry periods.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, thin out seedlings until they are finally 30cm (12in) apart in spring</div> <div>Outside sowings should be gradually thinned to the same spacings when the seedlings are large enough to handle.</div> <div>Cultivation:</div> <div>Flowers should be removed as soon as they have faded to promote the growth of further blooms. Never over water, but do not let the soil dry out.</div> <div>Preventive measures should be taken against aphids.</div> <div>Cut flowers will last 8 to 10 days in water. Cut when flowers are half-open; recut stems underwater.</div> <div>Plant Uses:  </div> <div>Cut Flowers, Flowers Borders and Beds, Patio and Container Plants</div> <div>Note:</div> <div>Plants must not be planted in the same ground two years in a row to avoid Fusarium Wilt - a soil-borne disease that has plagued Asters in the past.</div> <div>Nomenclature:</div> <div>The name Aster comes from the Ancient Greek word astron, meaning "star", arriving through the Latin word astrum with the same meaning, referring to the shape of the flower head.</div> <div>The genus name Callistephus (pronounced ka-LIS-te-fus) is derived from the Greek words “kallos” (meaning beautiful) and “stephanus” (meaning crown).</div> </div>
F 22
Chinese Aster Blue 1.95 - 4
  • Nové
Chinese Aster Pink 1.95 - 2

Chinese Aster Pink

Cena 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Chinese Aster Pink (Callistephus Aster)</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 260 seeds (0,5g).</span></strong></span></h3> <div><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Gremlin is a tall double variety of aster which makes excellent, long lasting cut flowers grown from flower seeds. Sow these flower seeds in well-drained soil in a sunny spot. This dark violet aster has twisted petals which are said to resemble a "tiger's paw" and is often referred to as Tiger Paw Aster or Krallenaster. The Gremlin aster is an extremely late cut flower with huge flowers with curved and quilled petals. This aster, when grown from flower seed, has an upright growth habit reaching nearly 30 inches in height.</span></div> <div>Sowing:</div> <div>Sow indoors 6 to 8 weeks before the last frost date, or sow directly where they are to flower once the soil has warmed. For a continuous show, you may wish to plant stagger the sowing dates. The seed may also be direct sown in April to May where the plants are to flower, but in this case flowering will start later. A sunny situation should be chosen for the aster bed, which should be prepared as soon as possible, making sure that drainage is good.</div> <div>Sowing Indoors  March to April</div> <div>March and April sowing should be made in gentle heat, sowing into trays of compost, “Just cover” the seeds with a sprinkling of compost or vermiculite.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3in) pots or trays. Handle the plants with care and avoid disturbing the roots as much as possible when transplanting to prevent wilting.</div> <div>Gradually hardened off for 10 to 14 days before transplanting into the flowering site in early May. Light spring frosts will not harm the plants.</div> <div>Plant 25 -40cm (10 to 16in) apart.</div> <div>Direct Sowing   April to May</div> <div>Sow thinly, 6mm (1/4in) deep in small clumps or shallow drills. Sow 30cm (12in) apart in well-cultivated soil which has been raked to a fine tilth. Water ground regularly, especially in dry periods.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, thin out seedlings until they are finally 30cm (12in) apart in spring</div> <div>Outside sowings should be gradually thinned to the same spacings when the seedlings are large enough to handle.</div> <div>Cultivation:</div> <div>Flowers should be removed as soon as they have faded to promote the growth of further blooms. Never over water, but do not let the soil dry out.</div> <div>Preventive measures should be taken against aphids.</div> <div>Cut flowers will last 8 to 10 days in water. Cut when flowers are half-open; recut stems underwater.</div> <div>Plant Uses:  </div> <div>Cut Flowers, Flowers Borders and Beds, Patio and Container Plants</div> <div>Note:</div> <div>Plants must not be planted in the same ground two years in a row to avoid Fusarium Wilt - a soil-borne disease that has plagued Asters in the past.</div> <div>Nomenclature:</div> <div>The name Aster comes from the Ancient Greek word astron, meaning "star", arriving through the Latin word astrum with the same meaning, referring to the shape of the flower head.</div> <div>The genus name Callistephus (pronounced ka-LIS-te-fus) is derived from the Greek words “kallos” (meaning beautiful) and “stephanus” (meaning crown).</div> </div>
F 47
Chinese Aster Pink 1.95 - 2
  • Nové
Chinese Aster Red 1.95 - 3

Chinese Aster Red

Cena 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Chinese Aster Red (Callistephus Aster)</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 260 seeds (0,5g).</span></strong></span></h3> <div><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Gremlin is a tall double variety of aster which makes excellent, long lasting cut flowers grown from flower seeds. Sow these flower seeds in well-drained soil in a sunny spot. This dark violet aster has twisted petals which are said to resemble a "tiger's paw" and is often referred to as Tiger Paw Aster or Krallenaster. The Gremlin aster is an extremely late cut flower with huge flowers with curved and quilled petals. This aster, when grown from flower seed, has an upright growth habit reaching nearly 30 inches in height.</span></div> <div>Sowing:</div> <div>Sow indoors 6 to 8 weeks before the last frost date, or sow directly where they are to flower once the soil has warmed. For a continuous show, you may wish to plant stagger the sowing dates. The seed may also be direct sown in April to May where the plants are to flower, but in this case flowering will start later. A sunny situation should be chosen for the aster bed, which should be prepared as soon as possible, making sure that drainage is good.</div> <div>Sowing Indoors  March to April</div> <div>March and April sowing should be made in gentle heat, sowing into trays of compost, “Just cover” the seeds with a sprinkling of compost or vermiculite.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3in) pots or trays. Handle the plants with care and avoid disturbing the roots as much as possible when transplanting to prevent wilting.</div> <div>Gradually hardened off for 10 to 14 days before transplanting into the flowering site in early May. Light spring frosts will not harm the plants.</div> <div>Plant 25 -40cm (10 to 16in) apart.</div> <div>Direct Sowing   April to May</div> <div>Sow thinly, 6mm (1/4in) deep in small clumps or shallow drills. Sow 30cm (12in) apart in well-cultivated soil which has been raked to a fine tilth. Water ground regularly, especially in dry periods.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, thin out seedlings until they are finally 30cm (12in) apart in spring</div> <div>Outside sowings should be gradually thinned to the same spacings when the seedlings are large enough to handle.</div> <div>Cultivation:</div> <div>Flowers should be removed as soon as they have faded to promote the growth of further blooms. Never over water, but do not let the soil dry out.</div> <div>Preventive measures should be taken against aphids.</div> <div>Cut flowers will last 8 to 10 days in water. Cut when flowers are half-open; recut stems underwater.</div> <div>Plant Uses:  </div> <div>Cut Flowers, Flowers Borders and Beds, Patio and Container Plants</div> <div>Note:</div> <div>Plants must not be planted in the same ground two years in a row to avoid Fusarium Wilt - a soil-borne disease that has plagued Asters in the past.</div> <div>Nomenclature:</div> <div>The name Aster comes from the Ancient Greek word astron, meaning "star", arriving through the Latin word astrum with the same meaning, referring to the shape of the flower head.</div> <div>The genus name Callistephus (pronounced ka-LIS-te-fus) is derived from the Greek words “kallos” (meaning beautiful) and “stephanus” (meaning crown).</div> </div>
F 49
Chinese Aster Red 1.95 - 3
  • Nové