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Chili - Habanero Seeds

There are 177 products.

Showing 1-15 of 177 item(s)

Variety from Peru
Rocoto Manzano Seeds

Rocoto Manzano Seeds

Price €1.55 - SKU: C 3
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Rocoto Manzano Fresh Organic Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong><strong><br /></strong></span></h2> <div>These plants produce HUGE chilies the size of racquetballs! The heat is similar to a habanero but these have MUCH BETTER FLAVOR (almost like a spicy butternut squash). Their thick flesh makes an amazing stuffed or grilled pepper! The plants leaves grow "hairy" and they produce beautiful purple leaves. </div> <div>Capsicum pubescens is a species of the genus Capsicum (pepper), known as rocoto (Quechua: ruqutu) and locoto (Aymara: luqutu), which is found primarily in Central and South America. It is known only in cultivation. The species name, pubescens, means hairy, which refers to the hairy leaves of this pepper. The hairiness of the leaves, along with the black seeds, distinguish this species from others.[4] As they reach a relatively advanced age and the roots lignify quickly, sometimes they are called tree chili. Of all the domesticated species of peppers, this is the least widespread and systematically furthest away from all others. It is reproductively isolated from other species of the genus Capsicum.[3] A very notable feature of this species is its ability to withstand cooler temperatures than other cultivated pepper plants,[5] but cannot withstand frost.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Vegetative characteristics</strong></div> <div>Like all other species of the genus Capsicum, plants of the species Capsicum pubescens grow as a shrub, but sometimes as climbing plants. They grow into four-meter woody plants relatively quickly, and live up to 15 years, which gives them, especially with age, an almost tree-like appearance.[6] After a first impulse is formed, the plant branches at a height of about 30 cm for the first time, and forms during growth by further dividing into a bushy appearance. More shoots develop from the leaf axils. Some varieties have purple discoloration on the branches, as can be observed in other Capsicum species. The leaves have a 5–12 mm long petiole and a leaf blade ovate to 5–12 cm long, 2.5 to 4 cm wide, tapering at the top and the base is wedge-shaped.</div> <div>In addition to the relatively long life, Capsicum pubescens differs in many other characteristics from related species.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Flowers</strong></div> <div>The flowers appear singly or in pairs (rarely up to four) on the shoots, and the branches are at about 1 cm long flower stems, which extend on the fruit to around 4–5 cm. The calyx has five triangular pointed teeth, which have in the fruit a length of about 1 mm. A characteristic different from other cultivated species of the genus Capsicum is the blue-violet-colored petals, brighter in the centre. The anthers are partly purple, partly white.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Distribution</strong></div> <div>Capsicum pubescens is found in cultivation primarily in north-western South America, as well as southern Central America.[citation needed] It is believed to have evolved from other, more primitive Capsicum species also occurring in the same area.[citation needed] C. pubescens grows at higher elevations than other species, and cannot survive the tropical heat in the lowlands.</div> <div>There are several cultivars of C. pubescens; most are rarely cultivated, and are now relatively scarce.</div> <div>Cultivars include 'Canario' (yellow), 'Manzano' (red), 'Peron' (pear-shaped), and 'Rocoto Longo' (which was developed in the Canary Islands).</div> <div> </div> <div><span style="font-size:12pt;"><strong>30.000 - 50.000 SHU</strong></span></div>
C 3 O
Rocoto Manzano Seeds
  • New
Bhut Jolokia Seeds

Bhut Jolokia Seeds

Price €2.50 - SKU: C 4
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Bhut Jolokia Seeds Red, Chocolate, Orange, Yellow</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span> </strong></h2> <p>Recognised as the world's hottest chilli pepper by a large margin, Bhut Jolokia is also known by several other names, Borbih jolokia, Naga jolokia, Nagahari, Naga Morich, Raja mirchi etc.  The fruits turn from green to a vivid scarlet red when fully mature.  Originating and extensively cultivated in Northeastern India heat is variable according to its growing conditions, plants grown in dry conditions cooler conditions will be less hot than those grown in less dry and hotter conditions. Harvest: 100+ days.</p> <p>Our plant is in the pot now has a whopping height of 168 cm and we believe that next year will certainly grow over 200 cm!</p> <p>This variety is best for the experienced grower only and requires patience.</p> <p>All our Jolokia seeds are imported directly from the leading producer in Assam India.</p> </body> </html>
C 4 R (10 S)
Bhut Jolokia Seeds
  • New

Habanero Senegal Seeds

Habanero Senegal Seeds

Price €2.50 - SKU: C 6
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Habanero Senegal Seeds</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of<strong> 5 </strong>seeds.<br /></strong></span></h3> <div>This extremely hot, high yielding, pepper originates from the Senegal. These plants produce HUGE chilies. The taste is mild, vanilla/nuts, but the <strong>heat is in top for the habaneros</strong>.</div> <div>It’s an ideal pepper for making hot sauces.</div>
C 6
Habanero Senegal Seeds
  • New
Habanero Savina Red Seeds 2.45 - 5

Habanero Savina Red Seeds

Price €2.45 - SKU: C 5
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Habanero Savina Red Seeds</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><strong style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></h3> <div>The Red Savina pepper is a cultivar of the habanero chili (Capsicum chinense Jacquin), which has been selectively bred to produce hotter, heavier, and larger fruit. <span style="font-size:10.909090995788574px;line-height:1.5em;">Frank Garcia of GNS Spices, in Walnut, California, is credited with being the developer of the Red Savina habanero. The exact method Garcia used to select the hottest strains is not publicly known.</span></div> <div>The Red Savina is protected by the U.S. Plant Variety Protection Act (PVP #9200255).</div> <div>In February 2007, the Red Savina chili was displaced in Guinness World Records as the hottest chili in the world by the Naga Jolokia pepper. The Red Savina held the record from 1994 until 2006.</div> <div>Red Savina peppers were reported to a score up to 577,000 on the Scoville scale, but this oft-quoted figure was never verified; a comparison experiment carried out by a group of researchers including Regents Professor Paul W. Bosland at the Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State University in 2005 revealed an average heat level of 248,556 SHUs for Red Savina habaneros. Orange Habaneros may get as hot as 357,729 SHUs, but the average Orange Habanero is around 200,000 SHUs. The average Bhut Jolokia pepper is 1,019,687 SHus.</div>
C 5
Habanero Savina Red Seeds 2.45 - 5
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Penis Chili Seeds 3 - 14

Penis Chili Seeds

Price €3.00 - SKU: C 9
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Penis Chili Seeds (Peter Pepper)</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h3> <div>Definitely not for the prudish. The Peter Pepper is named for its similarity in appearance to an anatomical part. This definitely is a pepper that gets people talking. Plants grow to about 2 feet in height. Medium hot to hot with a good taste. Green fruit ripening to yellow. Can be eaten fresh or dried for seasoning and making chili powder.</div>
C 9
Penis Chili Seeds 3 - 14
  • New
Habanero IVORY Seeds 2 - 1

Habanero IVORY Seeds

Price €2.00 - SKU: C 14
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Habanero IVORY Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Habanero Ivory Colors, refers to the species (Capsicum chinense) and has a white and yellow fruit color, and is sharp in comparison to other varieties of Habanero. Not large bushes 40-50 cm in height produce not large, but very sharp fruits of chili pepper. This variety is high-yielding and has a fairly short ripening period of 75-90 days. The plant is a perennial plant. Small fruits have a fruity aroma with very high severity, which is 100,000 - 300,000. Scoville.</span></p> <p>Heat Level                     10</p> <p>Pod size (W x L cm)        1 x 2</p> <p>Pod Colour                     G &gt; Y&gt; I</p> <p>Plant Size (H x W cm)    40 x 50</p> <p>Approx no. Pods/plant        80</p>
C 14
Habanero IVORY Seeds 2 - 1
  • New
Habanero Kreole Seeds 2 - 1

Habanero Kreole Seeds

Price €14.00 - SKU: C 15
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Habanero Kreole Seeds (C.chinense)</strong></em></span></h2><h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 100 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h3><div>Very compact, densely foliaged plants bear an abundance of bright Red , thin-skinned hot peppers that are shaped like a like a lantern. Interesting shape and spicy taste make this pepper good to eat fresh, pickle, or use as a garnish. 95 days. 150.000-350.000 HSU</div><p><strong><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/?v=JVFsnvVvqW4" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVFsnvVvqW4</a></strong></p>
C 15
Habanero Kreole Seeds 2 - 1
  • New
Scotch Bonnet Trinidad Seeds 1.5 - 1

Scotch Bonnet Trinidad Seeds

Price €5.00 - SKU: C 16
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Scotch Bonnet Trinidad Seeds</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Pack of 3 or 20 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p><span style="font-size:10.909090995788574px;line-height:1.5em;"><span style="font-size:10pt;">One of the all time classic chillies. There are many different strains of this classic, this being from the Island of Trinidad. Good Heat, Great Flavour, always a great grower. The Scotch Bonnet is not the same chilli as the Habanero they are of the same species but the Scotch Bonnet is not a Cultivar. The Scotch Bonnet has a different shape - one which closely resembles a Scot's bonnet - so it is very easy to differentiate the two. It grows mainly in the Caribbean islands while the Habanero grows mainly in Latin and North American. The flavour of the two, however, is very similar as is their heat Level. The Scotch Bonnet Red is 1 to 1-1/2 inches in diameter, is irregularly shaped. Some say the flavour is even more tropical and fruity than the Habanero. It is great for salsas and sauces. (Capsicum Chinense).</span><br /></span></p>
C 16
Scotch Bonnet Trinidad Seeds 1.5 - 1
  • New
Habanero Hot Lemon Seeds 1.95 - 3

Habanero Hot Lemon Seeds

Price €1.95 - SKU: C 17
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Habanero Hot Lemon Seeds</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for package of 5 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h3> <div>These peppers are hot, hot, hot!!!!  Just like the orange habaneros, this yellow variety is not for the faint of heart or stomach! These plants produce small, lantern-shaped, lemon yellow peppers averaging 1” to 1-1/2” inches long and wide.  They are prolific producers of wrinkled, thin-skinned peppers, use them fresh or dried, and then freeze or can the extra bounty! </div> <div>It’s recommended that you start these pepper seeds indoors about 7 to 9 weeks before the last frost in your area, so you can transplant them outside at the appropriate time.  Hot peppers can be grown in containers on the patio, and can also be grown indoors, providing they get enough natural or artificial light.</div> <div>These seeds were harvested in 2012. </div> <div> </div> <div>Height  -   24" -  32"</div> <div>Days to harvest  -  85</div> <div>Zones  -  all</div> <div>Scoville units  -  150,000  -  325,000</div> <div>Scoville units measure the “hotness “ of peppers.</div>
C 17
Habanero Hot Lemon Seeds 1.95 - 3
  • New
Habanero Orange - Red Seeds

Habanero Red, Yellow,...

Price €1.85 - SKU: C 19
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Habanero Red, Yellow, Orange Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10, 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The habanero is a variety of chili pepper. Unripe habaneros are green, and they color as they mature. The most common color variants are orange and red, but the fruit may also be white, brown, yellow, green, or purple. Typically, a ripe habanero chili is 2–6 cm (0.8–2.4 in) long. Habanero chilis are very hot, rated 100,000–650,000 on the Scoville scale. The habanero's heat, its flavor, and its floral aroma have made it a popular ingredient in hot sauces and spicy foods.</p> <p>The name indicates something or someone from La Habana (Havana). In English, it is sometimes spelled and pronounced habañero, the tilde being added as a hyperforeignism patterned after jalapeño.</p> <p><strong>Origin and current use</strong></p> <p>The habanero chili comes from the Amazon, from which it was spread, reaching Mexico. A specimen of a domesticated habanero plant, dated at 8,500 years old, was found at an archaeological site in Peru.[citation needed] An intact fruit of a small domesticated habanero, found in pre-ceramic levels in Guitarrero Cave in the Peruvian highlands, was dated to 6500 BC.</p> <p>The habanero chili was disseminated by Spanish colonists to other areas of the world, to the point that 18th-century taxonomists mistook China for its place of origin and called it Capsicum chinense ("the Chinese pepper").</p> <p>Today, the largest producer is the Yucatán Peninsula, in Mexico. Habaneros are an integral part of Yucatecan food, accompanying most dishes, either in natural form or purée or salsa. Other modern producers include Belize, Panama, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, and parts of the United States, including Texas, Idaho, and California.</p> <p>The Scotch bonnet is often compared to the habanero, since they are two varieties of the same species, but they have different pod types. Both the Scotch bonnet and the habanero have thin, waxy flesh. They have a similar heat level and flavor. Both varieties average around the same level of pungency, but the actual degree varies greatly from one fruit to another according to genetics, growing methods, climate, and plant stress.</p> <p>In 1999, the habanero was listed by Guinness World Records as the world's hottest chili, but it has since been displaced by other peppers. The Bhut jolokia (or ghost pepper) and Trinidad moruga scorpion have since been identified as native Capsicum chinense subspecies even hotter than the habanero. Breeders constantly crossbreed subspecies to attempt to create cultivars that will break the record on the Scoville scale. One example is the Carolina Reaper, a cross between a Bhut jolokia pepper with a particularly pungent red habanero.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Habaneros thrive in hot weather. Like all peppers, the habanero does well in an area with good morning sun and in soil with a pH level around 5 to 6 (slightly acidic). Habaneros which are watered daily produce more vegetative growth but the same number of fruit, with lower concentrations of capsaicin, as compared to plants which are watered only when dry (every seven days). Overly moist soil and roots will produce bitter-tasting peppers. Daily watering during flowering and early setting of fruit helps prevent flower and immature fruit from dropping, but flower dropping rates are reported to often reach 90% even in ideal conditions.</p> <p>The habanero is a perennial flowering plant, meaning that with proper care and growing conditions, it can produce flowers (and thus fruit) for many years. Habanero bushes are good candidates for a container garden. In temperate climates, though, it is treated as an annual, dying each winter and being replaced the next spring. In tropical and subtropical regions, the habanero, like other chiles, will produce year round. As long as conditions are favorable, the plant will set fruit continuously.</p> <p><strong>Cultivars</strong><br>Several growers have attempted to selectively breed habanero plants to produce hotter, heavier, and larger peppers. Most habaneros rate between 200,000 and 300,000 on the Scoville scale. In 2004, researchers in Texas created a mild version of the habanero, but retained the traditional aroma and flavor. The milder version was obtained by crossing the Yucatán habanero pepper with a heatless habanero from Bolivia over several generations.</p> <p>Black habanero is an alternative name often used to describe the dark brown variety of habanero chilis (although they are slightly different, being slightly smaller and slightly more sphere-shaped). Some seeds have been found which are thought to be over 7,000 years old. The black habanero has an exotic and unusual taste, and is hotter than a regular habanero with a rating between 400,000 and 450,000 Scoville units. Small slivers used in cooking can have a dramatic effect on the overall dish. Black habaneros take considerably longer to grow than other habanero chili varieties. In a dried form, they can be preserved for long periods of time, and can be reconstituted in water then added to sauce mixes. Previously known as habanero negro, or by their Nahuatl name, their name was translated into English by spice traders in the 19th century as "black habanero". The word "chocolate" was derived from the Nahuatl word, xocolātl [ʃoˈkolaːt͡ɬ], and was used in the description, as well (as "chocolate habanero"), but it proved to be unpronounceable to the British traders, so it was simply named "black habanero".</p> <p>A 'Caribbean Red,' a cultivar within the habanero family, has a citrusy and slightly smoky flavor, with a Scoville rating ranging from 300,000 to 445,000 Scoville units.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
C 19 B 7-S
Habanero Orange - Red Seeds
  • New
Elephant's Trunk Yellow Chili Seeds

Elephant Trunks Yellow...

Price €2.50 - SKU: C 20
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Elephant Trunks Yellow Chili Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price is for package of 20 seeds.</strong><strong><br /></strong></span></h2> <p>Type of chili pepper that is recommended for the production of cultivated land. The fruits are long and pointed and grow up, Sorta, which bears fruit in very large numbers. The fruit is usually 10-12 grams weight and changes color from dark green in yellow. It is very suitable for sequencing and for pickling. It is wanted for specific mild lemon flavor.</p> <p>Sow as any other hot pepper, and in the room can be kept as a perennial plant.</p> </body> </html>
C 20
Elephant's Trunk Yellow Chili Seeds
  • New
Habanero Madame Jeanette Seeds 2 - 1

Habanero Madame Jeanette Seeds

Price €2.00 - SKU: C 22 Y
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Habanero Madame Jeanette Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h2> <p>Madame Jeanette (Capsicum chinense) is a chili pepper originally from Suriname. The fruits are shaped like small bell peppers but with Habanero-like heat. The peppers ripen to reddish-yellow but they are larger and not symmetrical. It may be related to the Suriname Red (as this pepper is also known as 'Suriname Yellow'). Often this pepper is mixed up with the Yellow Adjuma which is less elongated and said to have more heat and less aroma.</p>
C 22 Y
Habanero Madame Jeanette Seeds 2 - 1
  • New

Habanero Chocolate Seeds 2 - 3

Habanero Chocolate Seeds

Price €2.00 - SKU: C 19 C
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Habanero Chocolate Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><strong style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></h2> <p><strong style="color:#ff0000;"></strong>The habanero is a variety of chili pepper. When used in English, it is sometimes spelled (and pronounced) habañero—the diacritical mark being added as a hyperforeignism. Unripe habaneros are green, and they color as they mature. Common colors are orange and red, but white, brown, and pink are also seen. Typically a ripe habanero chili is 2–6 centimetres (0.8–2.4 in) long. Habanero chilis are intensely hot, rated 100,000–350,000 on the Scoville scale.</p> <p>The habanero chili comes from the Amazonas region, and from there it was spread in Mexico. One domesticated habanero, which was dated at 8,500 years old, was found at an archaeological dig in Mexico. [4] An intact fruit of a small domesticated habanero was found in Pre-ceramic levels in Guitarrero Cave in the Peruvian highlands, and was dated to 6500 B.C.E. It migrated north to the Caribbean via Colombia.</p> <p>Upon its discovery by Spaniards, it was rapidly disseminated to other adequate climate areas of the world, to the point that 18th-century taxonomists mistook China for its place of origin and called it "Capsicum chinense"—the Chinese pepper.</p> <p>Today, the largest producer is Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.[8] Other modern producers include Belize, Panama (locally named ají chombo), Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador and parts of the United States, including Texas, Idaho, and California. While Mexico is the largest consumer of this spicy ingredient, its flavor and aroma have become increasingly popular all over the world.</p> <p>Habaneros are an integral part of Yucatecan food. Habanero chilies accompany most dishes in Yucatán, either in solid or purée/salsa form.</p> <p>The Scotch bonnet is often compared to the habanero, since they are two varieties of the same species, but have different pod types. Both the Scotch bonnet and the habanero have the characteristic thin, waxy flesh. They have a similar heat level and flavor. Although both varieties average around the same level of "heat", the actual degree of piquancy varies greatly from one fruit to another with genetics, growing methods, climate, and plant stress.</p> <p>The habanero's heat, its fruity, citrus-like flavor, and its floral aroma have made it a popular ingredient in hot sauces and spicy foods. Habaneros are sometimes placed in tequila or mezcal bottles, particularly in Mexico, for a period ranging from several days to several weeks, to make a spiced version of the drink.</p> <p>In 2000, the habanero was listed in the Guinness book of World Records as the world's hottest chili, but it has since been displaced by a number of other peppers, the record tending to change hands every few years.</p> <p>Today, the largest producer is Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Other modern producers include Belize, Panama (locally named ají chombo), Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador and parts of the United States, including Texas, Idaho, and California. While Mexico is the largest consumer of this spicy ingredient, its flavor and aroma have become increasingly popular all over the world.</p> <p>Habaneros are an integral part of Yucatecan food. Habanero chilies accompany most dishes in Yucatán, either in solid or purée/salsa form.</p> <p>The Scotch bonnet is often compared to the habanero, since they are two varieties of the same species, but have different pod types. Both the Scotch bonnet and the habanero have the characteristic thin, waxy flesh. They have a similar heat level and flavor. Although both varieties average around the same level of "heat", the actual degree of piquancy varies greatly from one fruit to another with genetics, growing methods, climate, and plant stress.</p> <p>The habanero's heat, its fruity, citrus-like flavor, and its floral aroma have made it a popular ingredient in hot sauces and spicy foods. Habaneros are sometimes placed in tequila or mezcal bottles, particularly in Mexico, for a period ranging from several days to several weeks, to make a spiced version of the drink.</p> <p>In 2000, the habanero was listed in the Guinness book of World Records as the world's hottest chili, but it has since been displaced by a number of other peppers, the record tending to change hands every few years.</p> <p>Habaneros thrive in hot weather. As with all peppers, the habanero does well in an area with good morning sun and in soil with a pH level around 5 to 6 (slightly acidic). The habanero should be watered only when dry. Overly moist soil and roots will produce bitter-tasting peppers.The habanero is a perennial flowering plant, meaning that with proper care and growing conditions, it can produce flowers (and thus fruit) for many years. Habanero bushes are good candidates for a container garden. In temperate climates, though, it is treated as an annual, dying each winter and being replaced the next spring. In tropical and subtropical regions, the habanero, like other chiles, will produce year round. As long as conditions are favorable, the plant will set fruit continuously.</p> <p>Several growers have attempted to selectively breed habanero plants to produce hotter, heavier, and larger peppers. Most habaneros rate between 200,000 and 300,000 Scoville units.</p> <p>In 2004, researchers in Texas created a mild version of the habanero, but retained the aroma and flavor of the traditional pepper. The milder version was obtained by crossing the Yucatán habanero pepper with a heatless habanero from Bolivia over several generations. These mild habaneros were expected to be widely available in the future as of 2004.</p> <p>Black habanero is an alternative name often used to describe the dark brown variety of habanero chilis (although they're slightly different, being slightly smaller and slightly more sphere-shaped). There have been cases where some types of seeds have been found, and they're thought to be over 7,000 years old. It (the black habanero) has an exotic and unusual taste and is hotter than a regular habanero with a Scoville rating that ranges between 400,000 and 450,000 Scoville units. Small slivers used in cooking can have a dramatic effect on the overall dish. Gourmets delight in its fiery heat and unusual flavor. Black habaneros take considerably longer to grow than other habanero chili varieties. In a dried form, they can be preserved for long periods of time, and can be reconstituted in water then added to sauce mixes. Previously known as habanero negro, or by their Nahuatl name, they were translated into English by spice traders in the 19th century as "black habanero". The word "chocolate" was derived from the Nahuatl word, xocolātl [ʃo'kolaːt͡ɬ], and was used in the description as well (as "chocolate habanero"), but it proved to be unpronounceable to the British traders, so it was simply named "black habanero".</p>
C 19 C
Habanero Chocolate Seeds 2 - 3
  • Online only
  • New

Chili Seeds Bishop's Crown or Christmas Bell

Chili Seeds Bishop's Crown...

Price €2.25 - SKU: C 24 BC
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5/ 5
<div class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Chili Seeds Bishop's Crown or Christmas Bell</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h3> <div>5,000-30,000 Scovilles. Capsicum Baccatum. This chile is a member of the Capsicum Baccatum species, which includes the Ají pepper. It has an interesting shape, hence its name, and can be very spicy, with a fruity flavor. It is red when mature, and measures about 1 inch long and 2-3 inches wide. </div> <div>It can be used fresh in salsas or salads, and can be dried or pickled as well.</div> <div><strong>Video:</strong></div> <div><strong><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/?v=OROE2E63CpI&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OROE2E63CpI&amp;feature=youtu.be</a></strong></div> <p><strong><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/?v=WX0sjOq7DZ4&amp;feature=plcp" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WX0sjOq7DZ4&amp;feature=plcp</a></strong></p> <p> </p> </div> <ul class="bullet block_hidden_only_for_screen"><li>Color: Red</li> <li>Organic seeds: Yes</li> <li>Fruit weight: </li> </ul><p><iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/OROE2E63CpI?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
C 24 BC
Chili Seeds Bishop's Crown or Christmas Bell
  • New
Chili Cayenne Long Slim Seeds

Chili Cayenne Long Slim Seeds

Price €7.85 - SKU: C 19 L
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Chili Cayenne Long Slim Seeds</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 50 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h3> <div> <p class="description">Long Slim Red Cayenne is one of the best known hot chili peppers, it is a good long hot chilli that always performs well and dries nicely. <br />Producing an abundance of very wrinkled fruits that grow 12 to 15cm (5 to 6in) long, the fruits have thin flesh and are used fresh in hot sauces or dried and ground for cayenne pepper. At a heat level of around 30,000 to 50,000 SHU, they are one of the best peppers for seasoning pickles and salsa. Good for deep freezing and perfect for adding a kick to a Bloody Mary or to vodka. <br /><br />Long Slim Red Cayenne is a very productive plant, it is upright-growing and reaches about 60cm in height. The plants are covered with long, thin peppers which mature from emerald green to a scarlet red in approximately 70 days. <br />This very attractive plants also make quite a spectacle when grown as a conservatory or patio plant.<br /><br />According to one anonymous writer, this variety was first documented in 1493 by Christopher Columbus and that one of his passengers, a man named de Cuneo, described how Native Americans ate peppers like one would eat an apple. Cayenne peppers are used threaded onto a string as attractive 'Ristra' craft decorations.</p> <p><strong><span class="headings">Storage of Seeds:</span> </strong><br />Store seeds away from children, sealed in their packaging in a cool, dry, dark place, or in a fridge. Never store them in a freezer as the sudden temperature drop is likely to kill them. Don't leave the seeds in direct sunlight as the heat generated may kill them.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Sowing</strong>:</span> Sow from mid February to mid June<br />The temperature, moisture, and air circulation all play a role in growing plants from seeds. Too little heat, too much moisture, and lack of air circulation will cause poor results. Do not use jiffy peat pots, plugs, or potting soil as the soil becomes too dry or too wet, which can lead to low germination, disease and fungus.<br />Fill small cells or trays with a good sterile seed compost and sow the seeds on the surface. “Just cover” with a fine sprinkling (3mm) of soil or vermiculite.<br />Keep the compost moist - don't let the top of the compost dry out (a common cause of germination failure) If you wish, spray the surface with a dilute copper-based fungicide.<br />Cover the pot or tray with plastic film or place in a heated propagator, south facing window or a warm greenhouse. <br />The ideal temperature is around 18 to 20°C (65 to 72°F)</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Transplanting</strong>:</span> <br />When the seedlings have produced their first pair of true leaves they can be potted on into individual 7 to 10cm (3 to 4in) pots. Use good quality potting compost and mix in some organic slow release fertiliser. Pot the chilli on again before it becomes root-bound.<br />Water the seedlings regularly, but don't let them become waterlogged as this encourages rot. Don't let them dry out as they rarely recover at this stage. Water the soil, not the foliage. Once the plants have established, it is better to water heavy and infrequently, allow the top inch or so to dry out in between watering.</p> <p>Seedlings should be grown in good light, but should not be exposed to direct sunlight from late spring to early autumn. Weaker sunlight from autumn to spring is unlikely to do them harm. Once seedlings have put on some growth they need lots of light. Growing them under a grow-light produces excellent stocky plants, as will a warm sunny windowsill. Adult chilli plants need lots of light. However, more than 4 hours or so in hot direct sunlight will dry them out quickly.<br />Acclimatise to outdoor conditions for 2 to 3 weeks before they are moved permanently outside. Plant them into rich moist soil. Flower do not form and fruit will not set if the temperature is much below 17°C (62°F) for most of the day, so wait until June/July for best results with outdoor planting.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Fertilising</strong>: </span><br />After the first flowers appear, feed every one or two weeks with a half-strength liquid tomato feed. You could also add Seaweed extract to the water once a week.</p> <p><strong><span class="headings">Pollinating Flowers:</span> (optional)</strong><br />Chilli plants are self fertile and will generally pollinate themselves. However, if you want to give them a helping hand to ensure that lots of fruit are set indoors, use a cotton wool bud to gently sweep the inside of the flowers, spreading the pollen as you go. The flower's petals will drop off as the green middle part of the flower starts to swell slightly. This is the chilli pepper beginning to grow.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Harvesting</strong>:</span> Harvest in 90 to 110 days <br />Chillies will take a few weeks to develop and a further couple weeks to turn from green to red. Harvest any time after they are fully developed. Use scissors to snip the fruits so you don't damage the plant.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Storage</strong>:</span> <br />After being roasted and peeled, Poblanos can be preserved by either canning or freezing. Storing poblanos in airtight containers will suffice for several months.</p> <p><span class="warning"><strong>WARNING</strong>: </span><br />Be careful handling chilli seeds as they can cause a painful burning sensation: Avoid contact with the eyes or any sensitive skin before washing your hands thoroughly.</p> <p><span class="headings"><strong>Origin</strong>:</span> <br />Chiles originated in South America, where they have been under cultivation since prehistoric times. The seed's long viability facilitated the rapid spread of the plant throughout the tropics and sub-tropics by the Spanish and Portuguese, the spice becoming as popular there as vine pepper. Chiles were long known as 'Indian' pepper - meaning 'of the New World' rather than 'of India'. <br />The Cayenne is known to be Pre-Columbian in origin. It is said to be named after the Cayenne River in French Guyana. First offered in the seed trade by Joseph Breck &amp; Son in 1883</p> </div>
C 19 L
Chili Cayenne Long Slim Seeds
  • New