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New products

There are 27 products.

Showing 1-15 of 27 item(s)
Dieghito Jalapeno Chili Seeds

Dieghito Jalapeno Chili Seeds

Price €2.45 - SKU: C 18 D
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Dieghito Jalapeno Chili Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> The Dieghito Jalapeno (Capsicum annuum) pepper comes to us from Italy. It is reported to be a cross between a Farmers Market Jalapeno and an unknown variety. Or the Italians just do not want us to know what that other variety is.&nbsp;<br><br>As of 2020, it is said to be an F5 generation. The Dieghito Jalapeno chiles ripen from green to red with cracking lines or corking on its exterior skin. The peppers are unique as they have a heart or round shape to them. They are very juicy and the heat ranges from mild to medium.&nbsp;<br><br>The Dieghito Jalapeno peppers are great for roasting, stuffing, salsa, and pickling.&nbsp;<br><br>The flavor is Jalapeno but with more sweetness. The Dieghito Jalapeno chile plants grow up to 1,2 m (4 feet) tall.<br><br>Some of the thickest walled peppers we have ever seen. &nbsp;<br><br>They are very sweet and also very mild with little to no heat at times.<script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
C 18 D
Dieghito Jalapeno Chili Seeds
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Variety from Slovenia
Red Onion seeds Ptujski Luk

Red Onion seeds Ptujski Luk

Price €2.05 - SKU: P 448 PL
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Red Onion seeds Ptujski Luk</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 250 (1 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <strong>THE KING OF ONIONS and a European specialty!</strong><br>Ptujski onion is manually grown, picked, and braided in wreaths just as it has been for the past 200 years. Its flavor, pungency, and quality make it one of the best onion varieties. The traditional methods of cultivation used as well as its origin have earned Ptujski onion the Protected Geographical Indication mark, and a place not only on the list of protected Slovenian agricultural products but also of European specialties.<br><br><strong>Flavour, origin, tradition</strong><br>Both the gravelly ground and the climate, with its perfect combination of sun and rain, give special pungency to this onion variety. Ptujski lük is perfect for cooking and disintegrates quickly. It also stores well – typically, in a dark and cool place until the spring.<br><br> <h3><strong>How do you recognize Ptujski onion?</strong></h3> Its flat, heart shape<br>The reddish-brown to the bright red coloring of its scale leaves<br>Its white flesh, with a purple-reddish tinge and pronounced purple edge<br>Its moderately pungent taste<br>Its strong ‘oniony’ smell
P 448 PL
Red Onion seeds Ptujski Luk
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Sickle senna seeds (Cassia...

Sickle senna seeds (Cassia...

Price €0.00 - SKU: MHS 64 CT
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Sickle senna seeds (Cassia tora)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for package 1 g (350) seeds.</strong></span></h2> Senna tora (originally described by Linnaeus as Cassia tora) is a plant species in the family Fabaceae and the subfamily Caesalpinioideae. Its name is derived from its Sinhala name tora (තෝර). It grows wild in most of the tropics and is considered a weed in many places. Its native range is in Central America. Its most common English name is sickle senna[2] or sickle wild sensitive-plant.[3] Other common names include sickle pod, tora, coffee pod, tovara, chakvad, thakara in Malayalam, and foetid cassia. It is often confused with Chinese senna or sicklepod, Senna obtusifolia.<br><br>Senna tora is an herbaceous annual foetid herb. The plant can grow 30–90 centimeters (12–35 in) tall and consists of alternative pinnate leaves with leaflets mostly with three opposite pairs that are obovate in shape with a rounded tip. The leaves grow up to 3–4.5 centimeters long. The stems have distinct smelling foliage when young. The flowers occur in pairs in axils of leaves with five petals and pale yellow in color. The stamens are of unequal length. The pods are somewhat flattened or four-angled, 10–15 cm long, and sickle-shaped, hence the common name sicklepod. There are 30–50 seeds within a pod.<br><br> <h3><strong>Growing conditions</strong></h3> Senna tora is found in many parts of the world. It grows abundantly in parts of Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Nepal and Bhutan. It is also grown and cultivated areas in the Himalayas at an elevation of 1400 meters in Nepal. It is distributed throughout India, Sri Lanka, West China, and the tropics, particularly in forest and tribal areas.<br><br>Senna tora is considered an annual weed, is very stress-tolerant, and is easily grown. In India, it occurs as a wasteland rainy season weed and its usual flowering time is after the monsoon rains, during the period of October to February. Senna tora grows in dry soil from sea level up to 1800 meters. The seed can remain viable for up to twenty years. Up to 1000 plants can emerge per square meter following rain. Once the seed has matured, it is gathered and dried in the sun. In South Asia, it usually dies off in the dry season of July–October.<br><br> <h2><strong>Uses</strong></h2> Senna tora has many uses. The whole plant and roots, leaves, and seeds have been widely used in traditional Indian and South Asian medicine. The plant and seeds are edible. Young leaves can be cooked as a vegetable while the roasted seeds are used as a substitute coffee. In Sri Lanka, the flowers are added to food. It is used as a natural pesticide in organic farms, and as a powder commonly used in the pet food industry. It is mixed with guar gum for use in mining and other industrial applications. The seeds and leaves are used to treat skin disease and its seeds can be utilized as a laxative. Senna tora is made into tea. In the Republic of Korea, it is believed to rejuvenate human vision. This tea has been referred to as "coffee-tea", because of its taste and its coffee aroma. Since Senna tora has an external germicide and antiparasitic character, it has been used for treating skin diseases such as leprosy, ringworm, itching, and psoriasis and also for snakebites. Other medicinal provisions from plant parts include balm for arthritis using the leaves. Senna tora is one of the recognized plants that contain the organic compound anthraquinone and is used in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. This herb is used in Ayurveda for the treatment of swellings.<br><br> <h3><strong>Sowing the seeds&nbsp;</strong></h3> Soak the seeds for 2–3 hours in warm water before sowing it from early spring to early summer in a warm greenhouse or pot in your own home. The seed usually germinates in 1–12 weeks at 23°C.
MHS 64 CT
Sickle senna seeds (Cassia tora)
  • New
Chaksu, Jasmejaaz Seeds...

Chaksu, Jasmejaaz Seeds...

Price €0.00 - SKU: P 170 CA
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Chaksu, Jasmejaaz Seeds (Cassia absus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.&nbsp;</strong></span></h2> Annual herb, to 60 cm, glandular-hairy. Leaves: petiole to 4 cm, without a gland; leaves with 2 pairs of opposite leaflets with a gland on the rhachis between each pair. Inflorescences terminal. Petals 5-6 mm, yellow, orange, salmon, or pinkish-red with reddish-brown veins. Stamens 5, subequal; filaments straight. Pod 3-6 cm, flat.<br><br>Seeds contain alkaloids that have powerful actions on the nervous and vascular systems and are used accordingly for a variety of purposes in folk medicine.<br><br>In disturbed grassland or open woodland, also on roadsides, riverine alluvium, and formerly cultivated areas.<br><br>Widespread in the tropics and subtropics.<br><br>Health Benefits of Cassia Absus Seed<br><br>Due to the sudden increase in the number of chaksu seed buyers, the commercial cultivation of this medicinal plant is seriously being considered by farmers and those involved in the production of ayurvedic medicines. This is an Indian medicinal herb belonging to the Caesalpiniaceae family of plants. Also known as Cassia Absus, Chaksu seeds have many medicinal properties making them one of the most sought-after ayurvedic herbs that can be used in the form of decoction, powder, and even juice.<br><br>Chaksu Seeds for Lowering Blood Pressure<br><br>What makes these seeds really popular, is their ability to lower blood pressure. Acting as a hypotensive agent, this humble seed works wonders for those looking to control their BP naturally. It is a strong anti-bacterial agent and works as an astringent. It is also full of many phytochemicals such as alkaloids, essential fatty acids, and sterols. It is available in the form of seeds and Chaksu oil.<br><br>Medicinal Properties of Chaksu Seeds<br><br>These seeds are highly effective in treating common coughs.<br>You can get rid of ringworms by mixing Jasmezaaj seed paste in oil and applying it directly over the affected area.<br>The same oil can be used for curing many skin diseases.<br>It is an effective home remedy for treating urinary bladder problems.<br>Suffering from purulent conjunctivitis? Use Chakus seeds to cure it fast.<br>Treating wounds and sores with Chaksu seeds is very common in various parts of India.<br>Diuretic formulations are prepared by using these wonderful herbal plant seeds.<br>Eye lotions are prepared using Chaksu seeds.<br>It is an effective herbal treatment for eye ailments such as trachoma, ulcers, cataract, and polyps.<br>Pus formation and watering of eyes and many other eye infections are treated with Chaksu seed-based medicines.<br><br>Chaksu Synonyms<br><br>There are various other popular names of Chaksu in different parts of India. Let us take a look at some of it its synonyms<br><br>In Hindi Speaking Areas, it is known as Chaaksu.<br>In English, it is known as Chaksu seeds and Jasmejaaz.<br>It is called Chaksu in Sanskrit as well and also as Chakushya. In fact, the Hindi name has been derived from the original Sanskrit word.<br>In Tamil, it is popularly known as “Karun kanami”.<br>In Telugu, they are known as Chanupala vittulu.<br>In Bengali, it is called Chaakut.<br>Gujrati people call it Chimeru.<br>In most parts of Kerala and the surrounding Malayalam-speaking areas, it is known as Karinkolla.<br><br>No matter what you prefer to call these seeds, you’ll be immensely benefited by the herbal properties of this plant, its seeds and of course medicines prepared with it.
P 170 CA
Chaksu, Jasmejaaz Seeds (Cassia absus)
  • New

This plant is medicinal plant
Ajwain, ajowan Seeds...

Ajwain, ajowan Seeds...

Price €1.85 - SKU: MHS 107 TA
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Ajwain, ajowan Seeds (Trachyspermum ammi)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 1g (500) seeds.&nbsp;</strong></span></h2> <div class=""><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Ajwain</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">,<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">ajowan</b><sup id="cite_ref-oed_3-0" class="reference" style="color: #202122; font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>(</span><span class="rt-commentedText nowrap" style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="/dʒ/: 'j' in 'jam'">dʒ</span><span title="/ə/: 'a' in 'about'">ə</span><span title="'w' in 'wind'">w</span><span title="/ɒ/: 'o' in 'body'">ɒ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span></span>/</span></span><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">), or<span>&nbsp;</span></span><i style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><b>Trachyspermum ammi</b></i><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">—also known as<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">ajowan caraway</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">,<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">thymol seeds</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">,<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">bishop's weed</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">, or<span>&nbsp;</span></span><b style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">carom</b><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">—is an<span>&nbsp;</span></span>annual<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span>herb<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>in the family<span>&nbsp;</span></span>Apiaceae<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">.</span><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>Both the leaves and the<span>&nbsp;</span></span>seed<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">‑like<span>&nbsp;</span></span>fruit<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>(often mistakenly called seeds) of the plant are consumed by humans. The name "</span>bishop's weed<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">" also is a common name for other plants. The "seed" (i.e., the fruit) is often confused with<span>&nbsp;</span></span>lovage<span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>&nbsp;</span>"seed".<br><br><span>Ajwain's small, oval-shaped, seed-like fruits are pale brown&nbsp;</span>schizocarps<span>, which resemble the seeds of other plants in the family Apiaceae such as&nbsp;</span>caraway<span>,&nbsp;</span>cumin<span>&nbsp;and&nbsp;</span>fennel<span>. They have a bitter and pungent taste, with a flavor similar to&nbsp;</span>anise<span>&nbsp;and&nbsp;</span>oregano<span>. They smell almost exactly like&nbsp;</span>thyme<span>&nbsp;because they also contain&nbsp;</span>thymol<span>, but they are more aromatic and less subtle in taste, as well as being somewhat bitter and pungent. Even a small number of fruits tends to dominate the flavor of a dish.</span><br><br></span> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation_and_production">Cultivation and production</span></h2> <p>The plant is mainly cultivated in<span>&nbsp;</span>Iran<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>India.<sup id="cite_ref-Green2006_5-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_uses">Culinary uses</span></h2> <p>The fruits are rarely eaten raw; they are commonly<span>&nbsp;</span>dry-roasted<span>&nbsp;</span>or fried in<span>&nbsp;</span>ghee<span>&nbsp;</span>(clarified butter). This allows the spice to develop a more subtle and complex aroma. It is widely used in the<span>&nbsp;</span>cuisine of the Indian subcontinent, often as part of a<span>&nbsp;</span>chaunk<span>&nbsp;</span>(also called a<span>&nbsp;</span><i>tarka</i>), a mixture of spices - sometimes with a little chopped garlic or onion - fried in oil or clarified butter, which is used to flavor a dish at the end of cooking. It is also an important ingredient for herbal medicine practiced there. In<span>&nbsp;</span>Afghanistan, the fruits are sprinkled over bread and biscuits.<sup id="cite_ref-Davidson2014_6-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="As_a_medication">As a medication</span></h2> <p>There is little high-quality<span>&nbsp;</span>clinical evidence<span>&nbsp;</span>that ajwain has anti-disease properties in humans.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Ajwain is sold as a<span>&nbsp;</span>dietary supplement<span>&nbsp;</span>in<span>&nbsp;</span>capsules, liquids, or powders.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>An<span>&nbsp;</span>extract<span>&nbsp;</span>of bishop's weed is manufactured as a<span>&nbsp;</span>prescription drug<span>&nbsp;</span>called<span>&nbsp;</span>methoxsalen<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Uvadex</i>,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>8-Mop</i>,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Oxsoralen</i>) provided as a<span>&nbsp;</span>skin cream<span>&nbsp;</span>or oral capsule to treat<span>&nbsp;</span>psoriasis, repigmentation from<span>&nbsp;</span>vitiligo, or skin disorders of<span>&nbsp;</span>cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-drugs-meth_8-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[8]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Because methoxsalen has numerous interactions with<span>&nbsp;</span>disease-specific drugs, it is prescribed to people only by experienced<span>&nbsp;</span>physicians.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs-meth_8-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p>Ajwain is used in<span>&nbsp;</span>traditional medicine<span>&nbsp;</span>practices, such as<span>&nbsp;</span>Ayurveda, in<span>&nbsp;</span>herbal blends<span>&nbsp;</span>in the belief it can treat various disorders.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-3" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>There is no evidence or regulatory approval that oral use of ajwain in herbal blends is effective or safe.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-4" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Adverse_effects">Adverse effects</span></h3> <p>Women who are pregnant should not use ajwain due to potential<span>&nbsp;</span>adverse effects<span>&nbsp;</span>on fetal development, and its use is discouraged while breastfeeding.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-5" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In high amounts taken orally, bishop's weed is considered to be<span>&nbsp;</span>toxic<span>&nbsp;</span>and can result in fatal poisoning.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_7-6" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Essential_oil">Essential oil</span></h3> <p>Hydrodistillation<span>&nbsp;</span>of ajwain fruits yields an<span>&nbsp;</span>essential oil<span>&nbsp;</span>consisting primarily of<span>&nbsp;</span>thymol,<span>&nbsp;</span>gamma-terpinene,<span>&nbsp;</span>p-cymene, and more than 20 trace compounds which are predominantly<span>&nbsp;</span>terpenoids.</p> </div>
MHS 107 TA
Ajwain, ajowan Seeds (Trachyspermum ammi)
  • New
Large-fruited ginger seeds...

Large-fruited ginger seeds...

Price €1.95 - SKU: P 372 RA
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Large-fruited ginger seeds Renealmia alpinia Oaxacan Purple</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> Renealmia alpinia is a flowering plant species native to the Americas, where it grows from southern Mexico through much of South America, though not in the Southern Cone. It can also be found on several Caribbean islands.<br><br>This vigorous tropical ginger produces tall leafy shoots with undulate foliage and colorful reddish inflorescences spikes that appear from the ground between the leafy shoots and are followed by larger, oblong fruits with yellowish-orange pulp that are red at first and ripen to blackish purple.&nbsp;<br><br>This rare, large-fruited form is cultivated in Oaxaca, Mexico, where the fruits are popular and often sold in local markets to make a specialty soup with Hoja Santa (Piper auritum).
P 372 RA
Large-fruited ginger seeds Renealmia alpinia Oaxacan Purple
  • New
Bastard hogberry seeds...

Bastard hogberry seeds...

Price €0.00 - SKU: V 55 MN
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Bastard hogberry seeds (Margaritaria nobilis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for a package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <strong>Decoration for every yard and garden.</strong><br>Margaritaria nobilis is a deciduous tree with an open, globose crown, usually growing 8 - 16 meters tall. The straight, cylindrical bole can be 40 - 70cm in diameter. The plant can sometimes be more or less evergreen.<br><br>The tree is sometimes harvested from the wild for local use of its wood and is also suitable for use in re-establishing woodland. An ornamental tree and can be used in landscaping projects.<br><br>Margaritaria nobilis, also known as bastard hogberry, is a fruit-bearing plant found in Mexico, Central America, South America, and the West Indies.<br><br>The fruit is a bright iridescent blue color, resulting from a complex surface structure that interferes with light waves.<br><br>Succeeds in full sun and in dappled shade. Plants can tolerate seasonal inundation of the soil.<br>A moderate to a fast-growing tree.<br>Plants can flower and produce fruit nearly all year round.<br>A dioecious species, both male and female forms need to be grown if fruit and seed are required.<br><br>A high germination rate can usually be expected, with the seed sprouting within a few weeks. When the seedlings are 4 - 5cm tall, pot them up into individual containers and they should be ready to plant out about 4 - 5 months later.
V 55 MN
Bastard hogberry seeds (Margaritaria nobilis)
  • New
Wild currant seeds (Grewia...

Wild currant seeds (Grewia...

Price €1.75 - SKU: V 90 GF
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Velvet raisin, wild currant, seeds (Grewia flava)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price is for a package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Grewia flava is a hardy shrub or small tree, 2–4 m tall. The grey bark on the young branches, which is usually covered with thick-growing but quite short hairs, tends to turn dark grey and becomes smooth the older the tree gets; this is also noticeable on the stems. The greyish-green leaves are alternately arranged and are covered in fine hairs and it appears to be a lighter shade of green on the underside of the leaves. The apex (tip of the leaves) is rounded, whereas the margin is serrated. Three conspicuous veins from the leaf base are characteristic of this tree; a 2 mm long leaf stalk is also very noticeable.</div> <div></div> <div>The flowers appear in branched heads from early summer until mid-autumn (October to March) and are about 10–15 mm in diameter.</div> <div></div> <div>The 2-lobed fruit is ± 8 mm in diameter, green, turning reddish-brown when ripe. The sapwood appears to be light and the hardwood is brown, with a fine texture.</div> <div></div> <div>The leaves and fruits are enjoyed by domestic stock, as well as wild animals such as Kudu and Giraffe and a large variety of birds.</div> <div></div> <h3><strong>Uses</strong></h3> <div>The bark of the brandybush was often used to manufacture rope. The fruits are still used to enhance a kind of brandy or ‘mampoer’. The sweet vitamin C-enriched fruit can be enjoyed on its own as well. Traditionally porridge was prepared from the dried fruit after processing it into flour. The wood is hard and fine-grained and is used for sticks. Earlier hunters, like the San community, used to make their bows and arrows from the branches of this plant.</div> <div></div> <h3><strong>Growing Grewia flava</strong></h3> <div>This plant will grow best in well-drained soil and in a full sun position. It is quite safe to be planted near paved areas in the domestic garden, seeing that it does not have an aggressive root system. Because of the abundance of flowers, it can be successfully used as a focal point in the garden.</div> <div></div> <div>The plant is quite hardy and can withstand frost. Over-watering should be avoided when the plant is established.</div> <div></div> <div>The best propagation method is by seeds. Select fresh seeds, clean them and dry them in a well-ventilated shady area. Soak the seeds in water for at least 24 hours, the initial water must be hot water. Sow the seeds in seedling trays and cover it about 5 mm deep; use only river sand as the growth medium. Place the trays in a warm sheltered area. Do not let the growing medium dry out. A constant moisture level needs to be maintained for successful germination. The germination of the seeds is usually inconsistent, a success rate of about 50–70 % has been observed. Seedlings can be planted out into containers when they reach the 2-leaf stage.</div>
V 90 GF
Wild currant seeds (Grewia flava)
  • New
Wild Melon Seeds Cucumis...

Wild Melon Seeds Cucumis...

Price €1.75 - SKU: P 242 CMA
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Wild Melon Seeds Cucumis melo Agrestis</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> A dainty, annual climber growing to 1.5 m (5ft), with slender stalks, rounded leaves that are serrated around the edges, and small yellow flowers followed by tiny, edible, greenish mottled to yellow fruits with whitish flesh. They can be eaten raw when ripe or cooked as a vegetable when unripe but fruits from some plants are bitter. In India, dried and powdered fruits are a popular meat tenderizer. The seeds produce edible oil.<br><br><strong>Medicinal Uses</strong><br>The fruits can be used as a cooling light cleanser or moisturizer for the skin. They are also used as a first-aid treatment for burns and abrasions. The flowers are expectorant and emetic. The fruit is stomachic. The seed is antitussive, digestive, febrifuge and vermifuge. When used as a vermifuge, the whole seed complete with the seed coat is ground into a fine flour, then made into an emulsion with water and eaten. It is then necessary to take a purge in order to expel the tapeworms or other parasites from the body. The root is diuretic and emetic. A paste of the plant is applied as a poultice around the naval when there is difficulty in urinating.
P 242 CMA
Wild Melon Seeds Cucumis melo Agrestis
  • New
Super rare Carica papaya...

Super rare Carica papaya...

Price €5.95 - SKU: V 22 GM
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Super rare Carica papaya Gabon Melon seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> A rare papaya cultivar that is grown in central Africa. The plants produce large quantities of globose fruit nearly globose fruit that has an excellent flavor and texture.<br><br>Since this type of papaya does not grow tall (mini), it is great for growing in flower pots. It bears fruit as early as one year after sowing.
V 22 GM
Super rare Carica papaya Gabon Melon seeds
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Mountain papaya Seeds...

Mountain papaya Seeds...

Price €3.00 - SKU: V 22 VP
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Mountain papaya Seeds (Carica pubescens)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <h3 style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The Mountain Papaya is native to the cooler climates of cloud forests in the Andes between Panama and Chile, to an altitude of up to 3000 m. Apart from being a splendid ornamental, with large, dark green, palmate leaves that have velvety undersides, the female plants produce large quantities of yellow fruits which are traditionally used for preparing beverages and also cooked and eaten. Carica pubescens is best suited to warm temperate climates that lack extremes of heat or cold.<br><br><strong>WKIPEDIA:<br></strong><br>The<span>&nbsp;</span><b>mountain papaya</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Vasconcellea pubescens</i>) also known as<span>&nbsp;</span><b>mountain pawpaw</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>papayuelo</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>chamburo</b>, or simply "papaya" is a<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Species" title="Species" style="color: #0645ad;">species</a><span>&nbsp;</span>of the genus<span>&nbsp;</span><i><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasconcellea" title="Vasconcellea" style="color: #0645ad;">Vasconcellea</a></i>, native to the<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andes" title="Andes" style="color: #0645ad;">Andes</a><span>&nbsp;</span>of northwestern<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_America" title="South America" style="color: #0645ad;">South America</a><span>&nbsp;</span>from<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colombia" title="Colombia" style="color: #0645ad;">Colombia</a><span>&nbsp;</span>south to<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Chile" title="Central Chile" style="color: #0645ad;">central Chile</a>, typically growing at altitudes of 1,500–3,000 metres (4,900–9,800&nbsp;ft).</h3> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">It has also been known as<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Carica pubescens.<br><br></i></p> <p><i>Vasconcellea pubescens</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is an<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evergreen" title="Evergreen" style="color: #0645ad;">evergreen</a><span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pachycaul" title="Pachycaul" style="color: #0645ad;">pachycaul</a><span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrub" title="Shrub" style="color: #0645ad;">shrub</a><span>&nbsp;</span>or small<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree" title="Tree" style="color: #0645ad;">tree</a><span>&nbsp;</span>growing to 10 metres (33&nbsp;ft) tall.</p> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner" style="font-size: 13.16px;"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:2011.09-385-158arp_Mountain_papaya(Vasconcellea_pubescens),fr(wh,TS)_Naivasha-Gilgil(Rift_Valley_Prov.),KE_tue13sep2011-1230h.jpg" class="image" style="color: #0645ad;"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d5/2011.09-385-158arp_Mountain_papaya%28Vasconcellea_pubescens%29%2Cfr%28wh%2CTS%29_Naivasha-Gilgil%28Rift_Valley_Prov.%29%2CKE_tue13sep2011-1230h.jpg/220px-2011.09-385-158arp_Mountain_papaya%28Vasconcellea_pubescens%29%2Cfr%28wh%2CTS%29_Naivasha-Gilgil%28Rift_Valley_Prov.%29%2CKE_tue13sep2011-1230h.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="173" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d5/2011.09-385-158arp_Mountain_papaya%28Vasconcellea_pubescens%29%2Cfr%28wh%2CTS%29_Naivasha-Gilgil%28Rift_Valley_Prov.%29%2CKE_tue13sep2011-1230h.jpg/330px-2011.09-385-158arp_Mountain_papaya%28Vasconcellea_pubescens%29%2Cfr%28wh%2CTS%29_Naivasha-Gilgil%28Rift_Valley_Prov.%29%2CKE_tue13sep2011-1230h.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d5/2011.09-385-158arp_Mountain_papaya%28Vasconcellea_pubescens%29%2Cfr%28wh%2CTS%29_Naivasha-Gilgil%28Rift_Valley_Prov.%29%2CKE_tue13sep2011-1230h.jpg/440px-2011.09-385-158arp_Mountain_papaya%28Vasconcellea_pubescens%29%2Cfr%28wh%2CTS%29_Naivasha-Gilgil%28Rift_Valley_Prov.%29%2CKE_tue13sep2011-1230h.jpg 2x" data-file-width="3031" data-file-height="2377"></a> <div class="thumbcaption" style="font-size: 12.3704px;"> <div class="magnify"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:2011.09-385-158arp_Mountain_papaya(Vasconcellea_pubescens),fr(wh,TS)_Naivasha-Gilgil(Rift_Valley_Prov.),KE_tue13sep2011-1230h.jpg" class="internal" title="Enlarge" style="color: #0645ad;"></a></div> A ripe mountain papaya, whole and in cross section (Rift Valley Province, Kenya, September 2011).</div> </div> </div> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit" title="Fruit" style="color: #0645ad;">fruit</a><span>&nbsp;</span>is 6–15&nbsp;cm long and 3–8&nbsp;cm broad, with five broad longitudinal ribs from base to apex; it is green, maturing yellow to orange. The fruit pulp is edible, similar to<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papaya" title="Papaya" style="color: #0645ad;">papaya</a>, and is usually cooked as a vegetable. It is also eaten raw.</p> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner" style="font-size: 13.16px;"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vasconcellea_pubescens.jpg" class="image" style="color: #0645ad;"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/54/Vasconcellea_pubescens.jpg/220px-Vasconcellea_pubescens.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="222" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/54/Vasconcellea_pubescens.jpg/330px-Vasconcellea_pubescens.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/54/Vasconcellea_pubescens.jpg/440px-Vasconcellea_pubescens.jpg 2x" data-file-width="1000" data-file-height="1010"></a> <div class="thumbcaption" style="font-size: 12.3704px;"> <div class="magnify"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vasconcellea_pubescens.jpg" class="internal" title="Enlarge" style="color: #0645ad;"></a></div> Leaves of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Vasconcellea pubescens</i></div> </div> </div> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p><i>Vasconcellea pubescens</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is one of the parents of the '<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babaco" title="Babaco" style="color: #0645ad;">Babaco</a>' papaya, a<span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_(biology)" title="Hybrid (biology)" style="color: #0645ad;">hybrid</a><span>&nbsp;</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultivar" title="Cultivar" style="color: #0645ad;">cultivar</a><span>&nbsp;</span>widely grown for fruit production in South America, and in subtropical portions of North America.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i></i></p>
V 22 VP
Mountain papaya Seeds (Vasconcellea pubescens)
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Wild Pineapple Seeds...

Wild Pineapple Seeds...

Price €7.00 - SKU: V 62 BP
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Wild Pineapple Seeds (Bromelia pinguin)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> Bromelia pinguin is a plant species in the genus Bromelia. This species is native to Central America, Mexico, the West Indies, and northern South America. It is also reportedly naturalized in Florida. It is very common in Jamaica, where it is planted as a fence around pasture lands, on account of its prickly leaves.<br><br>This terrestrial bromeliad forms a fairly large rosette of dark green, sword-shaped leaves that are spiny along their edges. The inner leaves turn bright red when the plant produces a compact, pinkish inflorescence that is followed by yellowish fruits that are edible but highly acidic.&nbsp;<br><br>The yellowish fruit that is edible, known as piñuela, peeled like a banana and eaten. They are slightly tart with a crunch from the seeds. The plant can be stripped of its pulp, soaked in water, and beaten with a wooden mallet, and it yields a fiber whence thread is made. In countries like El Salvador, it is used to make gruel.
V 62 BP
Wild Pineapple Seeds (Bromelia pinguin)
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Plumiers Bromelia Seeds...

Plumiers Bromelia Seeds...

Price €2.95 - SKU: V 62 BK
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Plumier's Bromelia Seeds (Bromelia karatas)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> Bromelia karatas is a species of tropical plants in the Bromeliaceae family, widely distributed from the Caribbean to Central and South America. Its edible fruit is consumed by humans in fruit juice or raw.<br><br>The species is hemicryptophyte. It occurs in rosettes with short and robust stems which reproduces by runners or seedlings. The leaves are 2 to 3 meters in length and 4 to 6 centimeters in width. Strong thorns are arranged on the edge of the blade. The flowers are sessile.<br><br>The spindle-shaped greyish-yellow to red fruit is 4 to 8 centimeters in length, contains very many small black seeds in a white juicy flesh<br><br>Food use<br><br>The species is widely found in the wild but is also cultivated in hedges. Its red-skinned fruit with a flavor similar to that of the best-known species of Bromeliaceae, pineapple or Ananas comosus, is eaten raw or in fruit juice. Due to its high bromelina content, the fruit is susceptible to attack the mucous membranes of the mouth.<br><br>The fruit is known by many names, especially in Venezuela (camburito, chigüichigüe, curibijil, quiribijil, curujujul or cuscuta), in Mexico (cocuixtle, jocuiste or jocuixtle, timbiriche, timbirichi, in Cuba (maya cimarrona, maya piñon, maya de ratón), in Mexico, Colombia and Venezuela as piñuela, in Puerto Rico as piña de cuervo, in Portuguese as caraguata, carauata, coroata, croata and in French as carata , karatas, “penguin pineapple” 4 or even penguin bayyonnet.<br><br>In Mexico, especially Chiapas and the Hidalgo, the fruit is known as timbiriche and the fruit juice common in popular markets as agua de sabor. In the state of Jalisco, the fruit is known by several names, including piñuela, cocuixtle, or jocuixtle, and is eaten raw or used as the base for a taco sauce. It is also consumed in the state of Zacatecas where it is imported from Jalisco. In Peru, the juice is sucked directly from the fruit.
V 62 BK
Plumiers Bromelia Seeds (Bromelia karatas)
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Rare Chocola Seeds (Jarilla...

Rare Chocola Seeds (Jarilla...

Price €18.00 - SKU: V 161 JC
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Rare Chocola Seeds (Jarilla chocola)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div><span style="color: #333333; font-size: 17px;">This extraordinary papaya relative is a dry deciduous, perennial herb about 1 m tall that grows upright stems with broad, lobed leaves from a succulent underground tuber. The white and pink flowers are followed by remarkable pink fruits with five conspicuous ridges. The fruits are edible and have a very pleasant scent.&nbsp;<br><br>Jarilla chocola is widespread in valleys, canyons, and deciduous forests along Mexico's Pacific coast from the State of Sonora to Guatemala and El Salvador at elevations below 1300 m.&nbsp;<br><br>The fruits contain a white pulp with a creamy consistency and a slightly acidic taste, evoking that of a lemon. The starchy tubers could also be an interesting crop in their own right, comparable to potatoes.&nbsp;<br><br>In Chihuahua in northern Mexico, the locals eat the root raw or toasted and the fruit raw. Jarilla chocola is little known outside of Mexico and even less commonly cultivated. It grows best in tropical and warm temperate climates, in partial shade, and moist, well-drained soils.</span></div> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">regular watering during the growth period + dry between waterings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
V 161 JC
Rare Chocola Seeds (Jarilla chocola)
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Cat's Tail Aloe Seeds (Aloe...

Cat's Tail Aloe Seeds (Aloe...

Price €4.00 - SKU: CT 4 ACT
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 id="short_description_content"><strong>Cat's Tail Aloe Seeds (Aloe castanea)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <p>Aloe castanea (Cat's Tail Aloe) is a species of aloe endemic to South Africa.<br>A wonderful Aloe that forms a shrub or small tree to nearly 4 m tall with short, thick branches that hold rosettes of narrow, green, or pale blue leaves. The inflorescences are sparsely branched and look like cat's tails.&nbsp;<br><br>Easily grown from seed in warm temperate and tropical climates in USDA Zones 9 to 11.</p> </div> </div>
CT 4 ACT
Cat's Tail Aloe Seeds (Aloe castanea)
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