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Sea-onion, pregnant onion...

Sea-onion, pregnant onion...

Price €3.80 - SKU: CT 2 AB
,
5/ 5
<div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <h2><strong>Sea-onion, pregnant onion seeds (Albuca bracteata)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Albuca bracteata</b></i><span>&nbsp;(</span>syn.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Ornithogalum longebracteatum</i><sup id="cite_ref-WCSP_2-0" class="reference"></sup><span>), is known by the common names&nbsp;</span><b>pregnant onion</b><span>,</span><sup id="cite_ref-hunt_3-0" class="reference"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span><b>false sea onion</b><span>,</span><sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference"></sup><span>&nbsp;and&nbsp;</span><b>sea-onion</b><span>.</span><sup id="cite_ref-grin_5-0" class="reference"></sup><span>&nbsp;It is a species of&nbsp;</span>bulbous<span>&nbsp;flowering plant in the family&nbsp;</span>Asparagaceae<span>. Its flowering stems can reach a height of 90 cm and can carry up to 100 greenish-white flowers.</span></p> <p><span>Strap-shaped lanceolate leaves, 60 cm (2 ft) long and 2.5 cm (1 in) wide, protrude from a bulky bulb that is largely above ground. The roots are white and succulent. Many small, fragrant, white flowers, with a diameter of 0.5 cm and a green midvein, are located on&nbsp;racemes&nbsp;that can reach 70–90&nbsp;cm tall. Flowering usually occurs from spring through to early winter (May to August in the northern hemisphere), with 50 to 100 flowers per stalk. One plant can have up to 300 flowers at one time. Fruit capsules are 10&nbsp;mm long and 6&nbsp;mm in diameter. Seeds are oblong with dimensions of 4 by 1.5&nbsp;mm.&nbsp;<i>Albuca bracteata</i>&nbsp;is a cryptophyte, as the foliage dies back during drought periods.</span></p> <p><span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="en" data-language-to-translate-into="ru" data-phrase-index="0" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$53"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">Often grown as an ornamental plant.</span></span> <span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="en" data-language-to-translate-into="ru" data-phrase-index="1" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$54"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">The plant is very adaptable and therefore ideal for growing in containers.</span></span> <span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="en" data-language-to-translate-into="ru" data-phrase-index="2" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$55"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">Prefers direct sun.</span></span> <span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="en" data-language-to-translate-into="ru" data-phrase-index="3" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$56"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">The substrate must be well-drained.</span></span> <span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="en" data-language-to-translate-into="ru" data-phrase-index="4" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$57"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">Withstand temperatures of up to -5 ° C.</span></span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b" data-language-for-alternatives="en" data-language-to-translate-into="ru" data-phrase-index="5" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$58"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb"> </span></span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="en" data-language-to-translate-into="ru" data-phrase-index="6" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$59"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">In medicine, the crushed leaves of the plant are used to treat cuts and bruises.</span></span> <span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="en" data-language-to-translate-into="ru" data-phrase-index="7" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$60"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">According to some sources, the medicinal effect of this plant is similar to that of aloe vera.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="en" data-language-to-translate-into="ru" data-phrase-index="7" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$60"></span></span></p> </div> </div> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/C41IDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
CT 2 AB
Sea-onion, pregnant onion seeds (Albuca bracteata)
  • New

Variety from Japan
Shizuoka Crown Melon Seeds

Shizuoka Crown Melon Seeds

Price €4.95 - SKU: V 2 SC
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Shizuoka Crown Melon Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5, 10, 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The "Shizuoka Crown Melon" has the beauty of artistic form, a fragrance with the scent of musk, plenty of juice, mellow taste, and smooth texture, which is the high-grade melon cultivated in Fukuroi city of Shizuoka prefecture, called “Shizuoka Crown Melon”. “Shizuoka Crown Melon” is cultivated with sophisticated techniques of growers and grown absolutely in greenhouses. In other words, the ultimate taste of “Shizuoka Crown Melon”, which was born by outstanding virtuosity of professionals, has been taken over from generation to generation.</p> <p>The melon has been presented to the Japanese royal family for a long time and recognized as an elegant and prestigious fruit in Japan. Many VIPs also love Crown Melon. When the queen of the United Kingdom came to Japan and ate Crown Melon, we got words of praise.</p> </body> </html>
V 2 SC (5S)
Shizuoka Crown Melon Seeds
  • New

Yellow Lentil Seeds (Lens...

Yellow Lentil Seeds (Lens...

Price €1.85 - SKU: P 165 Y
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Yellow Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of </strong></span><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>100 (2.5g) </strong></span><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The lentil (Lens culinaris) is an edible pulse. It is a bushy annual plant of the legume family, grown for its lens-shaped seeds. It is about 40 cm (16 in) tall, and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each.</p> <p>Lentils have been part of the human diet since the aceramic (before pottery) Neolithic times, being one of the first crops domesticated in the Near East. Archeological evidence shows they were eaten 9,500 to 13,000 years ago.</p> <p>Lentil colors range from yellow to red-orange to green, brown and black. Lentils also vary in size, and are sold in many forms, with or without the skins, whole or split.</p> <p> </p> <p>The seeds require a cooking time of 10 to 40 minutes, depending on the variety—shorter for small varieties with the husk removed, such as the common red lentil — and have a distinctive, earthy flavor. Lentil recipes[2] are used throughout South Asia, the Mediterranean regions and West Asia. They are frequently combined with rice, which has a similar cooking time. A lentil and rice dish is referred to in western Asia as mujaddara or mejadra. Rice and lentils are also cooked together in khichdi, a popular dish in the Indian subcontinent (India and Pakistan); a similar dish, kushari, made in Egypt, is considered one of two national dishes. Lentils are used to prepare an inexpensive and nutritious soup all over Europe and North and South America, sometimes combined with some form of chicken or pork.</p> <p> </p> <p>Dried lentils can also be sprouted by soaking in water for one day and keeping moist for several days, which changes their nutrition profile.</p> <p>Lentils with husk remain whole with moderate cooking; lentils without husk tend to disintegrate into a thick purée, which leads to quite different dishes.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Nutritional value and health benefits</strong></p> <p>With about 30% of their calories from protein, lentils have the third-highest level of protein, by weight, of any legume or nut, after soybeans and hemp.[4] Proteins include the essential amino acids isoleucine and lysine, and lentils are an essential source of inexpensive protein in many parts of the world, especially in West Asia and the Indian subcontinent, which have large vegetarian populations. Lentils are deficient in two essential amino acids, methionine and cysteine. However, sprouted lentils contain sufficient levels of all essential amino acids, including methionine and cysteine.</p> <p>Lentils also contain dietary fiber, folate, vitamin B1, and minerals. Red (or pink) lentils contain a lower concentration of fiber than green lentils (11% rather than 31%).[8] Health magazine has selected lentils as one of the five healthiest foods.</p> <p> </p> <p>The low levels of Readily Digestible Starch (RDS) 5%, and high levels of Slowly Digested Starch (SDS) 30%, make lentils of great interest to people with diabetes. The remaining 65% of the starch is a resistant starch that is classified RS1, being a high quality resistant starch, which is 32% amylose.</p> <p> </p> <p>Lentils also have some anti-nutritional factors, such as trypsin inhibitors and relatively high phytate content. Trypsin is an enzyme involved in digestion, and phytates reduce the bio-availability of dietary minerals.  The phytates can be reduced by soaking the lentils in warm water overnight.</p> <p> </p> <p>Lentils are a good source of iron, having over half of a person's daily iron allowance in a one cup serving.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Production</strong></p> <p>Lentils are relatively tolerant to drought, and are grown throughout the world. The FAO reported that the world production of lentils for calendar year 2009 was 3.917 million metric tons, primarily coming from Canada, India, Turkey and Australia.</p> <p> </p> <p>About a quarter of the worldwide production of lentils is from India, most of which is consumed in the domestic market. Canada is the largest export producer of lentils in the world and Saskatchewan is the most important producing region in Canada. Statistics Canada estimates that Canadian lentil production for the 2009/10 year is a record 1.5 million metric tons.</p> <p> </p> <p>The Palouse region of eastern Washington and the Idaho panhandle, with its commercial center at Pullman, Washington, constitute the most important lentil-producing region in the United States. Montana and North Dakota are also significant lentil growers. The National Agricultural Statistics Service reported United States 2007 production at 154.5 thousand metric tons.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>In culture</strong></p> <p>The lens (double-convex shaped) is so called because the shape of a lens is basically the same shape as lentils. Lens is the Latin name for lentil.</p> <p>Lentils are mentioned many times in the Hebrew Bible, the first time recounting the incident in which Jacob purchases the birthright from Esau with stewed lentils (a "mess of pottage").[16] In Jewish mourning tradition, lentils are traditional as food for mourners, together with boiled eggs, because their round shape symbolizes the life cycle from birth to death.</p> <p> </p> <p>Lentils were a chief part of the diet of ancient Iranians, who consumed lentils daily in the form of a stew poured over rice.</p> <p>Lentils are also commonly used in Ethiopia in a stew-like dish called kik, or kik wot, one of the dishes people eat with Ethiopia's national food, injera flat bread. Yellow lentils are used to make a non-spicy stew, which is one of the first solid foods Ethiopian women feed their babies. In Pakistan, lentils are often consumed with Roti/bread or rice.</p> <p> </p> <p>In India, lentils soaked in water and sprouted lentils are offered to gods in many temples. It is also a practice in South India to give and receive sprouted peas by women who perform Varalakshmi Vratam. It is considered to be one of the best foods because the internal chemical structures are not altered by cooking.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Italy and Hungary, eating lentils on New Year's Eve traditionally symbolizes the hope for a prosperous new year, most likely because of their round, coin-like form.</p> <p>In Shia narrations, lentils are said to be blessed by seventy Prophets, including Jesus and Mohammed.</p> <p> </p> </body> </html>
P 165 Y
Yellow Lentil Seeds (Lens culinaris)
  • New

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
White Hardy Oleander Seeds...

White Hardy Oleander Seeds...

Price €1.95 - SKU: T 62 W
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>White Hardy Oleander Seeds (Nerium oleander)</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Undoubtedly a candidate for the most poisonous plant in the garden but also a contender for most beautiful.</p> <p>This species is considered to be native to Spain, the Balearic Islands, and Morocco east through Mediterranean coastal countries to the Arabian Peninsula, Ethiopia, Niger, Afghanistan, Iran and Iraq to India and central China. It occurs as a non-native in parts of Africa, the Azores, Japan, Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, the United States, central and eastern Mexico, Central and South America.</p> <p>This species is very widely cultivated as an ornamental. All parts of the plant are poisonous and so it is not grazed or eaten. Steam from boiled leaves is inhaled to relieve sinusitis, pounded leaves are applied to the skin to relieve itching, ulcers, and tumors (Jongbloed 2003); the leaves are used as an insecticide.</p> <p>Nerium</p> <p>Believed to come from the Greek ‘nerion’ which is, itself, believed to be based on ‘neros’, ‘wet’ or ‘fresh’.</p> <p>oleander</p> <p>Possibly a combination of the Latin ‘olea’, ‘olive’ and ‘rodandrum’, ‘rhododendron’ meaning the plant looks somewhat similar to a cross between these two.</p> <p>Common Names and Synonyms</p> <p>oleander, rose bay, common oleander, rose laurel</p> <h2>WIKIPEDIA:</h2> <p>Nerium oleander /ˈnɪəriəm ˈoʊliː.ændər/[3] is an evergreen shrub or small tree in the dogbane family Apocynaceae, toxic in all its parts. It is the only species currently classified in the genus Nerium. It is most commonly known as oleander, from its superficial resemblance to the unrelated olive Olea.[Note 1] It is so widely cultivated that no precise region of origin has been identified, though southwest Asia has been suggested. The ancient city of Volubilis in Morocco may have taken its name from the Berber name oualilt for the flower.[4] Oleander is one of the most poisonous commonly grown garden plants.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Oleander grows to 2–6 m (6.6–19.7 ft) tall, with erect stems that splay outward as they mature; first-year stems have a glaucous bloom, while mature stems have a grayish bark. The leaves are in pairs or whorls of three, thick and leathery, dark-green, narrow lanceolate, 5–21 cm (2.0–8.3 in) long and 1–3.5 cm (0.39–1.38 in) broad, and with an entire margin. The flowers grow in clusters at the end of each branch; they are white, pink to red,[Note 2] 2.5–5 cm (0.98–1.97 in) diameter, with a deeply 5-lobed fringed corolla round the central corolla tube. They are often, but not always, sweet-scented.[Note 3] The fruit is a long narrow capsule 5–23 cm (2.0–9.1 in) long, which splits open at maturity to release numerous downy seeds.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Habitat and range</strong></p> <p>N. oleander is either native or naturalized to a broad area from Mauritania, Morocco, and Portugal eastward through the Mediterranean region and the Sahara (where it is only found sporadically), to the Arabian peninsula, southern Asia, and as far East as Yunnan in southern parts of China.[5][6][7][8] It typically occurs around dry stream beds. Nerium oleander is planted in many subtropical and tropical areas of the world. On the East Coast of the US, it grows as far north as Virginia Beach, Virginia, while in California and Texas it is naturalized as a median strip planting.[citation needed] Because of its durability, Oleander was planted prolifically on Galveston Island in Texas after the disastrous Hurricane of 1900. They are so prolific that Galveston is known as the 'Oleander City'; an annual Oleander festival is hosted every spring.[9] Oleander can be grown successfully outdoors in southern England, particularly in London and mild coastal regions of Dorset and Cornwall.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>Some invertebrates are known to be unaffected by oleander toxins, and feed on the plants. Caterpillars of the polka-dot wasp moth (Syntomeida epilais) feed specifically on oleanders and survive by eating only the pulp surrounding the leaf-veins, avoiding the fibers. Larvae of the common crow butterfly (Euploea core) also feed on oleanders, and they retain or modify toxins, making them unpalatable to would-be predators such as birds, but not to other invertebrates such as spiders and wasps.</p> <p>The flowers require insect visits to set seed, and seem to be pollinated through a deception mechanism. The showy corolla acts as a potent advertisement to attract pollinators from a distance, but the flowers are nectarless and offer no reward to their visitors. They therefore receive very few visits, as typical of many rewardless flower species.[11][12] Fears of honey contamination with toxic oleander nectar are therefore unsubstantiated.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Ornamental gardening</strong></p> <p>Oleander is a vigorous grower in warm subtropical regions, where it is extensively used as an ornamental plant in parks, along roadsides, and as a windbreak. It will tolerate occasional light frost down to −10 °C (14 °F).,[8] though the leaves may be damaged. The toxicity of Oleander renders it deer-resistant. The plant is tolerant of poor soils, salt spray, and sustained drought, although it will flower and grow more vigorously with regular water. Nerium Oleander also responds well to heavy pruning, which should be done in the autumn or early spring to keep plants from becoming unruly.</p> <p>In cold-winter climates Oleander can be grown in greenhouses and conservatories, or as potted indoor plants that can be kept outside in the summer. Oleander flowers are showy, profuse, and often fragrant, which makes them very attractive in many contexts. Over 400 cultivars have been named, with several additional flower colors not found in wild plants having been selected, including red, pink, yellow, and salmon; white and a variety of pinks are the most common. Double flowered cultivars like 'Mrs Isadore Dyer' or 'Mont Blanc' are enjoyed for their large, rose-like blooms and strong fragrance. Many dwarf cultivars have also been developed, which grow only to about 10' at maturity. In most Mediterranean climates they can be expected to bloom from April through October, with their heaviest bloom usually in May or June.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Toxicity</strong></p> <p>Oleander has historically been considered a poisonous plant because some of its compounds may exhibit toxicity, especially to animals, when consumed in large amounts. Among these compounds are oleandrin and oleandrigenin, known as cardiac glycosides, which are known to have a narrow therapeutic index and can be toxic when ingested.</p> <p>Toxicity studies of animals administered oleander extract concluded that rodents and birds were observed to be relatively insensitive to oleander cardiac glycosides.[16] Other mammals, however, such as dogs and humans, are relatively sensitive to the effects of cardiac glycosides and the clinical manifestations of "glycoside intoxication".</p> <p>However, despite the common "poisonous" designation of this plant, very few toxic events in humans have been reported. According to the Toxic Exposure Surveillance System, in 2002, 847 human exposures to oleander were reported to poison centers in the United States.[19] Despite this exposure level, from 1985 through 2005, only three deaths were reported. One cited death was apparently due to the ingestion of oleander leaves by a diabetic man.[20] His blood indicated a total blood concentration of cardiac glycosides of about 20 μg/l, which is well above the reported fatal level. Another study reported on the death of a woman who self-administered "an undefined oleander extract" both orally and rectally and her oleandrin tissue levels were 10 to 39 μg/g, which were in the high range of reported levels at autopsy.[21] And finally, one study reported the death of a woman who ingested oleander 'tea'.[22] Few other details were provided.</p> <p>In contrast to consumption of these undefined oleander-derived materials, no toxicity or deaths were reported from topical administration or contact with N. oleander or specific products derived from them. In reviewing oleander toxicity, Lanford and Boor[23] concluded that, except for children who might be at greater risk, "the human mortality associated with oleander ingestion is generally very low, even in cases of moderate intentional consumption (suicide attempts)".</p> <p>Toxicity studies conducted in dogs and rodents administered oleander extracts by intramuscular injection indicated that, on an equivalent weight basis, doses of an oleander extract with glycosides 10 times those likely to be administered therapeutically to humans are still safe and without any "severe toxicity observed".</p> <p>In South Indian states such as Tamil Nadu and in Sri Lanka the seeds of related plant with similar local name (Kaneru(S) කණේරු) Cascabela thevetia produce a poisonous plum with big seeds. As these seeds contain cardenolides, swallowing them is one of the preferred methods for suicides in villages.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Effects of poisoning</strong></p> <p>Ingestion of this plant can affect the gastrointestinal system, the heart, and the central nervous system. The gastrointestinal effects can consist of nausea and vomiting, excess salivation, abdominal pain, diarrhea that may contain blood, and especially in horses, colic.[7] Cardiac reactions consist of irregular heart rate, sometimes characterized by a racing heart at first that then slows to below normal further along in the reaction. Extremities may become pale and cold due to poor or irregular circulation. The effect on the central nervous system may show itself in symptoms such as drowsiness, tremors or shaking of the muscles, seizures, collapse, and even coma that can lead to death.</p> <p>Oleander sap can cause skin irritations, severe eye inflammation and irritation, and allergic reactions characterized by dermatitis.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Treatment</strong></p> <p>Poisoning and reactions to oleander plants are evident quickly, requiring immediate medical care in suspected or known poisonings of both humans and animals.[25] Induced vomiting and gastric lavage are protective measures to reduce absorption of the toxic compounds. Charcoal may also be administered to help absorb any remaining toxins.[7] Further medical attention may be required depending on the severity of the poisoning and symptoms. Temporary cardiac pacing will be required in many cases (usually for a few days) until the toxin is excreted.</p> <p>Digoxin immune fab is the best way to cure an oleander poisoning if inducing vomiting has no or minimal success, although it is usually used only for life-threatening conditions due to side effects.</p> <p>Drying of plant materials does not eliminate the toxins. It is also hazardous for animals such as sheep, horses, cattle, and other grazing animals, with as little as 100 g being enough to kill an adult horse.[26] Plant clippings are especially dangerous to horses, as they are sweet. In July 2009, several horses were poisoned in this manner from the leaves of the plant.[27] Symptoms of a poisoned horse include severe diarrhea and abnormal heartbeat. There is a wide range of toxins and secondary compounds within oleander, and care should be taken around this plant due to its toxic nature. Different names for oleander are used around the world in different locations, so, when encountering a plant with this appearance, regardless of the name used for it, one should exercise great care and caution to avoid ingestion of any part of the plant, including its sap and dried leaves or twigs. The dried or fresh branches should not be used for spearing food, for preparing a cooking fire, or as a food skewer. Many of the oleander relatives, such as the desert rose (Adenium obesum) found in East Africa, have similar leaves and flowers and are equally toxic.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Folklore</strong></p> <p>The alleged toxicity of the plant makes it the center of an urban legend documented on several continents and over more than a century. Often told as a true and local event, typically an entire family, or in other tellings a group of scouts, succumbs after consuming hot dogs or other food roasted over a campfire using oleander sticks.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Garden history</strong></p> <p>In his book Enquiries into Plants of circa 300 BC, Theophrastus described (among plants that affect the mind) a shrub he called onotheras, which modern editors render oleander; "the root of onotheras [oleander] administered in wine", he alleges, "makes the temper gentler and more cheerful".</p> <p>The plant has a leaf like that of the almond, but smaller, and the flower is red like a rose. The plant itself (which loves hilly country) forms a large bush; the root is red and large, and, if this is dried, it gives off a fragrance like wine.</p> <p>In another mention, of "wild bay" (Daphne agria), Theophrastus appears to intend the same shrub.</p> <p>Oleander was a very popular ornamental shrub in Roman peristyle gardens; it is one of the flora most frequently depicted on murals in Pompeii and elsewhere in Italy. These murals include the famous garden scene from the House of Livia at Prima Porta outside Rome, and those from the House of the Wedding of Alexander and the Marine Venus in Pompeii.</p> <p>Willa Cather, in her book The Song of the Lark, mentions oleander in this passage:</p> <p>This morning Thea saw to her delight that the two oleander trees, one white and one red, had been brought up from their winter quarters in the cellar. There is hardly a German family in the most arid parts of Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, but has its oleander trees. However loutish the American-born sons of the family may be, there was never one who refused to give his muscle to the back-breaking task of getting those tubbed trees down into the cellar in the fall and up into the sunlight in the spring. They may strive to avert the day, but they grapple with the tub at last.</p> <p>Oleander is the official flower of the city of Hiroshima, having been the first to bloom following the atomic bombing of the city in 1945.</p> <p>It is the provincial flower of Sindh province.</p> </body> </html>
T 62 W
White Hardy Oleander Seeds (Nerium oleander)
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Balloon Plant Seeds...

Balloon Plant Seeds...

Price €1.25 - SKU: MHS 101 CH
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Balloon Plant Seeds (Cardiospermum halicacabum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Cardiospermum halicacabum</b></i>, known as the<span> </span><b>balloon plant</b><span> </span>or<span> </span><b>love in a puff</b>, is a climbing plant widely distributed across tropical and subtropical areas of Africa, Australia, and North America.<span> </span>It is often found as a weed along roads and rivers.</p> <p><span>The green parts of the plant are eaten as vegetables. </span>J. E. Tenison-Woods records that the seeds can be eaten while the fruit was eaten roasted.</p> <p>The root is<span> </span>diuretic<span> </span>and<span> </span>demulcent. It is<span> </span>mucilaginous, but has a nauseous taste, and is used to treat<span> </span>rheumatism.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>Sanskrit writers describe the root as<span> </span>emetic,<span> </span>laxative,<span> </span>stomachic, and<span> </span>rubefacient; they prescribe it in rheumatism, nervous diseases, piles, etc. The leaves are used in<span> </span>amenorrhoea.</p> <p>Rheede says that on the Malabar coast the leaves are administrated for pulmonic complaints. According to Ainslie, the root is considered laxative and is given in dosages of half a cupful twice daily. "It would appear that in rheumatism the Hindus [sic.] administer the leaves internally rubbed up with castor-oil, and also apply a paste, made with them, externally; a similar external application is used to reduce swellings and tumors of various kinds. (Dymock.)"<sup id="cite_ref-:1_2-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>In New Zealand, it is listed on the<span> </span>National Pest Plant Accord<span> </span>which identifies pest plants that are prohibited from commercial propagation and distribution. In Bermuda, it is listed as a Category 1 Invasive Plant by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.<span> </span>Within the United States, four southern states (Alabama, Arkansas, South Carolina, and Texas) have all placed this plant on their individual noxious weed lists.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_1-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>It is one among the "Ten Sacred Flowers of<span> </span>Kerala", collectively known as<span> </span><i>dasapushpam</i>.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 101 CH 3-S
Balloon Plant Seeds (Cardiospermum halicacabum)
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White Bamboo Seeds...

White Bamboo Seeds...

Price €2.95 - SKU: B 8 DM
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>White Bamboo Seeds (Dendrocalamus membranaceus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Dendrocalamus membranaceus also known as White Bamboo and formerly classified as “Bambusa membranacea” is a medium-sized tropical clumping bamboo originating from Southeast Asia. This bamboo species is a good source for paper pulp and has edible shoots.</p> <p>Height: 20 - 24 m<br />Diameter: 6 - 10 cm<br />Growth Habit: Clumping<br />Hardiness: -4°C<br />Origin: Southeast Asia</p> <p>Culms<br />Dendrocalamus membranaceus is a moderate-sized, strong bamboo forming a loose clump. Culms are straight and usually between 20-24 m high and 6-10 cm in diameter. Internodes are 22-38 cm long and covered with a white powdery deciduous scurf when young, but green on maturity. Nodes are strongly ringed and basal nodes show rootlets.</p> <p>Branches<br />Several to many clustered branches with 1-3 larger dominant branches. The upper branches are slender and bare many leaves.</p> <p>Leaves<br />Lance-shaped leaves are on average between 12-25 cm long and 1.5-2.5 cm broad.</p> <p>Uses<br />This bamboo is used for building purposes, furniture, bamboo board, agricultural implements, slat traps, matting, chopsticks, basketry, handicrafts, and as props for fruit trees. It is also one of the most promising species for pulp. Shoots are edible and consumed as a vegetable.</p> </body> </html>
B 8 DM
White Bamboo Seeds (Dendrocalamus membranaceus)
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Mini Gold sweet corn seeds

Mini Gold sweet corn seeds

Price €1.85 - SKU: P 38 MG
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Mini Gold sweet corn seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Sweet corn "Mini gold" (Zea mays var. saccharata) is an Early sweet corn variety and a great choice for aficionados of garden rarities. This very sweet, productive variety produces rather small, slender cobs that can be harvested and consumed even before they fully ripen.</p> <p>Conical cobs with small, rich in sugar grains are picked from the plants when they reach a length of 10 to 12 cm.</p> <p>They can be eaten cooked as a tasty addition to salads, meat, and Asian dishes. They are also great for preserves, marinades as they fit whole into jars.</p> </body> </html>
P 38 MG
Mini Gold sweet corn seeds
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We recommend this plant! We have tested this plant.

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
Tobacco seeds Hercegovacki...

Tobacco seeds Hercegovacki...

Price €2.45 - SKU: D 1 HR
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Tobacco seeds Hercegovacki Ravnjak (32 leaves)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Skija is a colloquial name for tobacco Ravnjak planted in the wider area of Herzegovina and Dalmatia. Eastern Herzegovina has been the home of this type of tobacco since ancient times, and later the cultivation spread to the western part of this region, as well as to the southern part of Dalmatia known as the Imotski region. Tobacco, which is a real "ski" for smoking, has been produced in the territory of Herzegovina since the 17th century</p> <p>The famous tobacco of the "Herzegovinian plain" variety has been entered in the international register of names of geographical origin, thus obtaining the protection of authenticity kept by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) based in Geneva.</p> <p>During the 1990s, tobacco almost disappeared in the Herzegovina area. With the disappearance of cattle, the natural fertilizer, which was necessary for fertilization, to make tobacco good, also disappeared. Cultivation has remained only in some extremely rural areas.</p> </body> </html>
D 1 HR
Tobacco seeds Hercegovacki Ravnjak (32 leaves)
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We recommend this plant! We have tested this plant.

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety
Bosnian garlic cloves Bosanac

Bosnian garlic cloves Bosanac

Price €1.55 - SKU: P 416 BB
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Bosnian garlic cloves "Bosanac"</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for 5 Garlic cloves</strong></span></h2> <p>Bosnian garlic may be small (on average one bulb weighs 10 grams), but it is irreplaceable because of the taste and Pungency. Today, only a few families still know and own this garlic in Bosnia and Herzegovina.</p> <p>From a grower's perspective, it is a tall dark green plant and is a very good survivor, usually grows healthy, and appears to be somewhat resistant to many of the diseases that can affect garlic. It originally from Bosnia and Herzegowina but grows well in all other countries.</p> <p>Those who are lucky enough to own it, replant it every year to maintain this exceptional variety of garlic.</p> <p>It is interesting to say that although it is extremely Pungency and has an extremely strong aroma, it still does not smell bad from breath like other varieties.</p> <p>We wholeheartedly recommend this variety of garlic and we are sure you will be as thrilled as we are!</p> </body> </html>
P 416 BB
Bosnian garlic cloves Bosanac
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Palestinian sweet lime...

Palestinian sweet lime...

Price €2.25 - SKU: V 119 CL
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Palestinian sweet lime seeds (Citrus limettioides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Citrus limettioides, Palestinian sweet lime or Indian sweet lime or common sweet lime, alternatively considered a cultivar of Citrus × limon, C. × limon 'Indian Lime', is a low acid lime that has been used in Palestine for food, juice, and rootstock.</p> <p>Indian sweet lime is a small evergreen tree with few thorns, growing 4 - 6 meters tall.<br />The tree is sometimes cultivated for its edible fruit, especially in India, the Mediterranean region, Vietnam, and tropical America</p> <p>It is a member of the sweet limes. Like the Meyer lemon, it is the result of a cross between the citron (Citrus medica) and a mandarin/pomelo hybrid distinct from sweet and sour oranges.</p> <p><strong>Edible Uses</strong></p> <p>Fruit - raw, cooked, or preserved. A succulent, acidic-sweet pulp. A soft drink is made from the juice.</p> <p><strong>Medicinal</strong></p> <p>The fruit has medicinal properties.<br />Citrus species contain a wide range of active ingredients and research is still underway in finding uses for them. They are rich in vitamin C, flavonoids, acids, and volatile oils. They also contain coumarins such as bergapten which sensitizes the skin to sunlight. Bergapten is sometimes added to tanning preparations since it promotes pigmentation in the skin, though it can cause dermatitis or allergic responses in some people. Some of the plants more recent applications are as sources of anti-oxidants and chemical exfoliants in specialized cosmetics.<br />Other Uses<br />Essential oil is obtained from the peel of the fruit.</p> <p>The plant is used as a rootstock for other Citrus species.</p> </body> </html>
V 119 CL
Palestinian sweet lime seeds (Citrus limettioides)
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Giant Bamboo seeds...

Giant Bamboo seeds...

Price €2.50 - SKU: B 5 DB
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2 id="short_description_content" class="rte align_justify"><strong>Giant Bamboo seeds (Dendrocalamus barbatus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Extremely rare and very large bamboo, originating from Asia and China, grows up to 15 meters in height. Clumping bamboo (non-invasive) grows to a diameter of 10 cm, forming attractive clusters with lanceolate leaves. The shoots initially turn orange, then turn green in youth, and finally develop a shiny gray coat as they age.</p> <p>The culms of this large bamboo are used for construction, and its shoots are one of the main food species in China and Thailand.</p> <p>Resistant to temperatures of around -4 ºC (25 ºF), sometimes lower temperatures, but the key is to keep the soil dry during frost.</p> <p>Bamboo seeds are not always available due to the shortage of most species, this is because bamboo rarely blooms, sometimes only every 30 to even 100 years.</p> </body> </html>
B 5 DB
Giant Bamboo seeds (Dendrocalamus barbatus)
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Black Jade Vine Seeds...

Black Jade Vine Seeds...

Price €12.50 - SKU: T 74 B
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Black Jade Vine Seeds (Mucuna nigricans)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f40202; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seed.</strong></span></h2> <p>This is a beautiful flowering vine. The dark violet blooms appear closely pushed together in grape like clusters, up to 30 cm long and 15 cm in diameter. Very vigorous woody tree creeper - during warmer weather this vine can grow 60 cm or more a week. The stems can reach up to 18 m in length</p> </body> </html>
T 74 B
Black Jade Vine Seeds (Mucuna nigricans)
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Yellow Crocus bulbs

Yellow Crocus bulbs

Price €3.50 - SKU: F 81 Y
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Yellow Crocus bulbs</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>The price is for package of 3 bulbs.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b><strong><span style="font-size: 12pt;">This variety is famous for its delightful fragrance. There's nothing like closing your eyes and breathing in the sweet scent of Spring! </span></strong></b></i></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b>Crocus</b></i> (English plural: crocuses or croci) is a genus of flowering plants in the iris family comprising 90 species of perennials growing from corms. Many are cultivated for their flowers appearing in autumn, winter, or spring. The spice saffron is obtained from the stigmas of <i>Crocus sativus</i>, an autumn-blooming species. Crocuses are native to woodland, scrub, and meadows from sea level to alpine tundra in central and southern Europe, in particular Krokos, Greece<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup>, on the islands of the Aegean, North Africa and the Middle East, and across Central Asia to Xinjiang Province in western China.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">The cup-shaped, solitary, salverform flower tapers off into a narrow tube. Their colors vary enormously, although lilac, mauve, yellow, and white are predominant. The grass-like, ensiform leaf<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference"></sup> shows generally a white central stripe along the leaf axis. The leaf margin is entire.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">A crocus has three stamens, while a similar-looking toxic plant, <i>colchicum</i>, sometimes popularly referred to as "autumn crocus", has six stamens. In addition, crocus have one style, while <i>colchicum</i> have three.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">About 30 of the species are cultivated, including <i>Crocus sativus</i> for saffron production. The varieties cultivated for decoration mainly represent five species: <i>C. vernus</i>, <i>C. chrysanthus</i>, <i>C. flavus</i>, <i>C. sieberi</i>, and <i>C. tommasinianus</i>. Among the first flowers to bloom in spring, crocuses are popular with gardeners. Their flowering time varies from the late winter <i>C. tommasinianus</i> to the later large hybridized and selected Giant "Dutch crocuses" (<i>C. vernus</i>). Crocus flowers and leaves are protected from frost by a waxy cuticle; in areas where snow and frost occasionally occur in the early spring, it is not uncommon to see early flowering crocuses blooming through a light late snowfall.</span></p> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 13pt; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/saffron-bulbs-saffron-crocus.html" target="_blank" title="Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here" style="color: #ff0000;" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here</strong></a></span></h2> </body> </html>
F 81 Y
Yellow Crocus bulbs
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Purple Crocus bulbs

Purple Crocus bulbs

Price €3.50 - SKU: F 81 P
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Purple Crocus bulbs</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>The price is for package of 3 bulbs.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b><strong><span style="font-size: 12pt;">This variety is famous for its delightful fragrance. There's nothing like closing your eyes and breathing in the sweet scent of Spring! </span></strong></b></i></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt; color: #000000; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><i><b>Crocus</b></i> (English plural: crocuses or croci) is a genus of flowering plants in the iris family comprising 90 species of perennials growing from corms. Many are cultivated for their flowers appearing in autumn, winter, or spring. The spice saffron is obtained from the stigmas of <i>Crocus sativus</i>, an autumn-blooming species. Crocuses are native to woodland, scrub, and meadows from sea level to alpine tundra in central and southern Europe, in particular Krokos, Greece<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup>, on the islands of the Aegean, North Africa and the Middle East, and across Central Asia to Xinjiang Province in western China.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">The cup-shaped, solitary, salverform flower tapers off into a narrow tube. Their colors vary enormously, although lilac, mauve, yellow, and white are predominant. The grass-like, ensiform leaf<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference"></sup> shows generally a white central stripe along the leaf axis. The leaf margin is entire.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">A crocus has three stamens, while a similar-looking toxic plant, <i>colchicum</i>, sometimes popularly referred to as "autumn crocus", has six stamens. In addition, crocus have one style, while <i>colchicum</i> have three.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: georgia, palatino; color: #000000;">About 30 of the species are cultivated, including <i>Crocus sativus</i> for saffron production. The varieties cultivated for decoration mainly represent five species: <i>C. vernus</i>, <i>C. chrysanthus</i>, <i>C. flavus</i>, <i>C. sieberi</i>, and <i>C. tommasinianus</i>. Among the first flowers to bloom in spring, crocuses are popular with gardeners. Their flowering time varies from the late winter <i>C. tommasinianus</i> to the later large hybridized and selected Giant "Dutch crocuses" (<i>C. vernus</i>). Crocus flowers and leaves are protected from frost by a waxy cuticle; in areas where snow and frost occasionally occur in the early spring, it is not uncommon to see early flowering crocuses blooming through a light late snowfall.</span></p> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 13pt; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/saffron-bulbs-saffron-crocus.html" target="_blank" title="Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here" style="color: #ff0000;" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Saffron Bulbs can be purchased here</strong></a></span></h2> </body> </html>
F 81 P
Purple Crocus bulbs
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Round-headed garlic bulbs...

Round-headed garlic bulbs...

Price €1.65 - SKU: P 475 AS
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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>Round-headed garlic bulbs (Allium sphaerocephalon)</h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 5 bulbs.</span></strong></h2> <p><i><b>Allium sphaerocephalon</b></i><span> </span>is a plant species in the<span> </span>Amaryllis family<span> </span>known as<span> </span><b>round-headed leek</b><span> </span>and also<span> </span><b>round-headed garlic</b>,<span> </span><b>ball-head onion</b>, and other variations on these names. Other names include Drumsticks, and in Germany, Kugellauch. Some publications use the alternate spelling<span> </span><i>A. sphaerocephalum</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>It is a hardy<span> </span>perennial plant.</p> <p><i>Allium sphaerocephalon</i><span> </span>is found in the wild across all parts of<span> </span>Europe<span> </span>except in the northernmost countries (Ireland,<span> </span>Netherlands,<span> </span>Scandinavia, and the<span> </span>Baltic States).<sup id="cite_ref-Davies1992_3-0" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>Its native range extends to northern<span> </span>Africa<span> </span>and to western<span> </span>Asia<span> </span>as far east as<span> </span>Iran.<sup id="cite_ref-ravenisgod_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>It is also reportedly naturalised in<span> </span>New York State<span> </span>in the<span> </span>US.<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup><span> </span>In the<span> </span>UK<span> </span>it grows wild only in the<span> </span>Avon Gorge<span> </span>so is known locally as the<span> </span><b>Bristol onion</b>.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>The species is prized by<span> </span>gardeners<span> </span>because of its striking floral display. The spherical "head" (technically an<span> </span>umbel) is borne on a long<span> </span>scape, up to 50 cm in height, usually in July. It can contain hundreds of deep purple flowers.<sup id="cite_ref-ravenisgod_5-1" class="reference">[5]</sup></p> <p>This plant has gained the<span> </span>Royal Horticultural Society’s<span> </span>Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p><i>Allium sphaerocephalon</i><span> produces egg-shaped bulbs. Small </span>bulblets<span> are present under the outer layer of the stem (making the plant potentially </span>invasive<span> when grown in gardens). Flowers are borne on a </span>scape<span> up to 50 cm in height, in a spherical to egg-shaped </span>umbel<span>, 1–6 cm in diameter, tightly packed with many flowers crowded together. The relatively small size of the umbel relative to the height of the stem makes this one of those described as 'drumstick alliums'. Individual flowers are reddish-purple and are occasionally replaced by bulbils (again making this a potentially invasive species).</span></p> <p><span></span></p> </body> </html>
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Round-headed garlic bulbs (Allium sphaerocephalon)
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