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Trees Bonsai Seeds

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This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria sinensis) 1.85 - 1

Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria...

Price €1.85
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria sinensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Wisteria (also spelled Wistaria or Wysteria) is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae, that includes ten species of woody climbing vines native to the Eastern United States and to China, Korea, and Japan. Some species are popular ornamental plants, especially in China and Japan. An aquatic flowering plant with the common name wisteria or 'water wisteria' is in fact Hygrophila difformis, in the family Acanthaceae.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><strong>Description</strong></span></p> <p>Wisteria vines climb by twining their stems either clockwise or counterclockwise round any available support. They can climb as high as 20 m above the ground and spread out 10 m laterally. The world's largest known Wisteria vine is in Sierra Madre, California, measuring more than 1 acre (0.40 ha) in size and weighing 250 tons. Planted in 1894, it is of the Chinese lavender variety.</p> <p>The leaves are alternate, 15 to 35 cm long, pinnate, with 9 to 19 leaflets. The flowers are produced in pendulous racemes 10 to 80 cm long, similar to those of the genus Laburnum, but are purple, violet, pink or white. There is no yellow on the leaves. Flowering is in the spring (just before or as the leaves open) in some Asian species, and in mid to late summer in the American species and W. japonica. The flowers of some species are fragrant, most notably Chinese Wisteria. The seeds are produced in pods similar to those of Laburnum, and, like the seeds of that genus, are poisonous.</p> <p>Wisteria is an extremely hardy plant that is considered an invasive species in many parts of the U.S., especially the Southeast, due to its ability to overtake and choke out other native plant species.</p> <p>Wisteria species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including brown-tail.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Wisteria, especially Wisteria sinensis, is very hardy and fast-growing. It can grow in fairly poor-quality soils, but prefers fertile, moist, well-drained soil. They thrive in full sun. Wisteria can be propagated via hardwood cutting, softwood cuttings, or seed. However, specimens grown from seed can take decades to bloom; for this reason, gardeners usually grow plants that have been started from rooted cuttings or grafted cultivars known to flower well.[citation needed] Another reason for failure to bloom can be excessive fertilizer (particularly nitrogen). Wisteria has nitrogen fixing capability (provided by Rhizobia bacteria in root nodules), and thus mature plants may benefit from added potassium and phosphate, but not nitrogen. Finally, wisteria can be reluctant to bloom because it has not reached maturity. Maturation may require only a few years, as in Kentucky Wisteria, or nearly twenty, as in Chinese Wisteria. Maturation can be forced by physically abusing the main trunk, root pruning, or drought stress.</p> <p>Wisteria can grow into a mound when unsupported, but is at its best when allowed to clamber up a tree, pergola, wall, or other supporting structure. Whatever the case, the support must be very sturdy, because mature Wisteria can become immensely strong with heavy wrist-thick trunks and stems. These will certainly rend latticework, crush thin wooden posts, and can even strangle large trees. Wisteria allowed to grow on houses can cause damage to gutters, downspouts, and similar structures. Its pendulous racemes are best viewed from below.</p> <p>Wisteria flowers develop in buds near the base of the previous year's growth, so pruning back side shoots to the basal few buds in early spring can enhance the visibility of the flowers. If it is desired to control the size of the plant, the side shoots can be shortened to between 20 and 40 cm long in mid summer, and back to 10 to 20 cm in the fall. Once the plant is a few years old, a relatively compact, free-flowering form can be achieved by pruning off the new tendrils three times during the growing season; in June, July and August, for the northern hemisphere. The flowers of some varieties are edible, and can even be used to make wine. Others are said to be toxic. Careful identification by an expert is strongly recommended before consuming this or any wild plant.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>The botanist Thomas Nuttall said he named the genus Wisteria in memory of Dr. Caspar Wistar (1761–1818).[1][2] Questioned about the spelling later, Nuttall said it was for "euphony," but his biographer speculated that it may have something to do with Nuttall's friend Charles Jones Wister, Sr., of Grumblethorpe, the grandson of the merchant John Wister.[3] (Some Philadelphia sources state that the plant is named after Wister.)[4] As the spelling is apparently deliberate, there is no justification for changing the genus name under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.[5] However, some spell the plant's common name "wistaria", and Fowler is decisively for the "wistaria" spelling.</p> <p>Genetic analysis shows Callerya, Afgekia and Wisteria to be each other's closest relatives and quite distinct from other members of the tribe Millettieae. Both have eight chromosomes.</p> <p><strong>In culture</strong></p> <p>Fuji Musumè (藤娘?) or Wisteria Maiden is an Otsu-e (Japanese folk painting in Ōtsu, Shiga) subject thought to have been inspired by popular dances. These paintings were often sold as good-luck charms for marriages. Fuji Musumè is also a famous classical Kabuki dance.</p> <p>In Barbara Kingsolver's novel The Bean Trees, Turtle refers to wisteria vines as bean trees, because the pre-bloomed flower pods are shaped like beans. Later, she and Taylor learn that wisteria is a legume (i.e., is in the bean family) and that wisteria and other legumes engage in symbiotic relationships, just as the book's characters do.</p> <p>In Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Giant Wistaria," the plant becomes both a sign of virility ("'It groweth well, this vine thou broughtest me in the ship, my husband.'") as well as a sign of destruction. A daughter has a child out of wedlock and her parents plan to take her back to the old country while giving the baby to a local town. The daughter hears this and ultimately, drowns the baby. She either hangs herself from the wistaria vines roots growing in the basement or they strangle her and kill her; the story doesn't clarify.</p> </body> </html>
T 46 (5 S)
Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria sinensis) 1.85 - 1
Arabica Coffee Plant Seeds 2.55 - 1

Arabica Coffee Plant Seeds

Price €2.55
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Seeds Arabica Coffee Plant (Coffea Catura Arabica)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 5 (1,3g) Seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The world's most important beverage plant, with its handsome shiny foliage and fragrant white flowers, make fine indoor plants. In its natural habitat, these become small trees up to 20 feet high but rarely exceed 6 feet inside. It is easy to care for the plant and adapts well to full sun to part shade. To produce flowers and eventually coffee beans, the temperature must be kept above 65 degrees F (18 degrees C). Plants will survive lower temperatures but flowering will be suppressed. Plants may bloom year-round depending on the temperature but generally, they are short-day plants, blooming most profusely when sunlight lasts for 8-10 hours a day. Flowers are generally self-fertile and will produce fruit without pollination. Coffee beans appear after flowering and turn red when they are ripe. These are worth raising as houseplants even if you don't like coffee! &nbsp;</p> <p>Coffee production has been a major source of income for Vietnam since the early 20th century. First introduced by the French in 1857, the Vietnamese coffee industry developed through the plantation system, becoming a major economic force in the country.</p> <p>Vietnam is the second-largest producer after Brazil, accounting for 14.3 percent of the world market share. The quality of the beans, however, has typically limited their marketability. Robusta coffee accounts for 97 percent of Vietnam's total output, with 1.17 million tonnes exported in 2009, a value of USD 1.7 billion. Arabica production is expected to rise owing to the expansion of growing areas. &nbsp;-- Wikipedia</p> <p>Of the two main species grown, arabica coffee (from C. arabica) is generally more highly regarded than robusta coffee (from C. canephora); robusta tends to be bitter and has less flavor but better body than arabica. For these reasons, about three-quarters of coffee cultivated worldwide is C. arabica. Robusta strains also contain about 40–50% more caffeine than arabica. For this reason, it is used as an inexpensive substitute for arabica in many commercial coffee blends. Good quality robusta beans are used in some espresso blends to provide a full-bodied taste, a better foam head (known as crema), and to lower the ingredient cost. -- Wikipedia</p> <div> <p>Coffee Arabica is one of the most in-demand and delicious coffee variants.&nbsp;</p> <p>If you can't survive without coffee, then plant and harvest your own coffee OUTDOORS or INDOORS! We sell fresh coffee seeds ready for planting. We get our seeds fresh from Vietnamese plantation farmers directly.</p> </div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 24-48 hours in warm water soak, then remove seed coat + skin</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm + with the flat side down</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 22-25 ° C.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">4-8 weeks&gt; irregularly</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 29 5S
Arabica Coffee Plant Seeds 2.55 - 1
Noni Seeds (Morinda citrifolia, Rubiaceae) 1.95 - 1

Noni Seeds (Morinda...

Price €2.20
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Noni Seeds (Morinda citrifolia, Rubiaceae)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Noni is a tropical fruit that was originally native to Polynesian islands but is now grown in many tropical regions around the world. It has been widely regarded in the traditional cultures of these regions to have medicinal properties. And it has a reputation as a relaxant and stress reliever, being used widely as a natural means of calming nerves and helping support sleep when consumed before bedtime.</p> <p>The easy-to-grow, tropical noni plant is a perennial that produces fruit year-round, even as a houseplant. Native to the South Pacific, it reaches heights of 10 feet in the climates of Tahiti, the Pacific Islands, South America and the Caribbean. Noni has large, waxy, pointed leaves and produces flowers from its lumpy, potato-shaped fruit with polygonal shaped sections. The juice, fruit, bark, and leaves of noni are all used for herbal remedies, according to the American Cancer Society.</p>
V 3
Noni Seeds (Morinda citrifolia, Rubiaceae) 1.95 - 1
Rambutan Fresh Seeds Exotic Fruits

Rambutan Seeds (Nephelium...

Price €4.95
,
5/ 5
<div> <h2><strong>Rambutan Seeds (Nephelium Lappaceum) Exotic Fruits</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Details of the benefits of the fruit rambutan is as follows:</div> <div>Skin fruit: to overcome dysentery, fever bark: to overcome the aphthous ulcer Leaves: to overcome diarrhea and blacken the hair roots: to overcome the fever seeds: to overcome diabetes (diabetes mellitus) for drugs drunk, no dosage recommendations. See example usage below! For external, milled leaves until smooth, then add a little water. Use water perasannya to blacken the hair gray.</div> <div> <p>example usage: Dysentery. Rambutan fruit skin wash (10 pieces), cut into pieces as needed. Add three cups of drinking clean water, then boil until the water is left half. After, cold, strain and drink twice a day, masing-masing three-quarters glasses. Fever. Wash skin fruit rambutan that has dried (15 g). Add three cups of water boiled until clean, then boil for 15 minutes. Once cool, strain and drink three times a day, each one-third part. Blacken the hair gray. Wash the leaves sufficiently, then mashed rambutan until smooth. Add a little water while stir until evenly into dough-like mush. Production method and strain with a piece of cloth. Use the accumulated water to moisten the hair of their heads. Do every day until the visible results. Diabetes. Gongseng seed rambutan (five seeds), and then milled to a powder. %u2022Brewing time with one cup of hot water. After a cold, drinking the water all at once. Do times a day aphthous ulcer. </p> </div> <div>Efficacy and benefits of Rambutan-Rambutan is one of those plants that are multi-use. All parts of this plant, from the bark, leaves, seeds, until the roots, can serve as a remedy. Tawarnya power is also amazing. Fever, aphthous ulcer, dysentery, gray, until of diabetes, can heal with the right herb. Types of rambutan fruit that grows in Indonesia are: ropiah, simacan, sinyonya, lebakbulus, and binjei. For those of you who want to menamam fruit is how very easy there are three ways that kang salman know in breeding by planting seeds, buds, or grafting. <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Soak seeds in water and leave it for one night.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Place the seeds on the soil moist.</span><br /><span>Cover with a thin soil.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>20-25 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>1-8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Watering in the morning every day.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table></div> </div> <div> </div>
V 4
Rambutan Fresh Seeds Exotic Fruits
Japanese Silverberry - Autumn Olive Seeds (Elaeagnus umbellata) 2.45 - 1

Japanese Silverberry -...

Price €2.45
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Autumn Olive Seeds Elaeagnus umbellata, Japanese silverberry</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h2> <div><span>Autumn olives are small in size and are round to oval in shape, growing on a deciduous shrub that can grow as tall as six meters in height. The spotted, matte skin is smooth and is painted in green, pink, and vibrant red hues. Inside, the opaque pink to red flesh is soft and juicy with one inedible seed in the center. Autumn olives are sweet, but can also be quite tart in taste depending on when they are picked in the season. In addition to the drupes, the leaves on the Autumn olive plant are oval and slightly elongated in shape, with dark green tops and grey to green undersides coated in silver scales. The leaves are also found in an alternating pattern and the edges of the leaves can be slightly rippled. The stem of the shrub is silver to golden brown with thorns and in the early spring cream to light yellow flowers can be found in clusters on the shrub. </span><br /> <h2>Seasons/Availability</h2> <span>Autumn olives are available in the late summer through late fall. </span><br /> <h2>Current Facts</h2> <span>Autumn olives, botanically classified as Elaeagnus umbellata, are known as a drupe, which is a fruit with an outer fleshy membrane and one single seed or pit inside. Also known as Japanese silverberry, Spreading oleaster, Umbellata oleaster, Autumn berries, and Autumn elaeagnus, Autumn olives are believed to have been given their name from their similarity in appearance to the Mediterranean olive tree even though the fruit is not an olive and is more similar to a berry. The Autumn olive plant is prolific and has the ability to thrive in poor soil, pastures, riverbanks, meadows, open woods, and even along roadsides. Originally introduced to North America to help control erosion, the plant quickly spread and has become an invasive species in specific regions of the United States. Though the plant is aggressive in its growth, it also provides a source of food for animals, and home chefs enjoy using the drupes in jams and baked goods. </span><br /> <h2>Nutritional Value</h2> <span>Autumn olives are high in vitamins A, E, and C and are known for their high content of the antioxidant, lycopene. </span><br /> <h2>Applications</h2> <span>Autumn olives are best suited for both raw and cooked applications such as boiling, mashing, and pureeing. They can be used in both sweet and savory applications and are commonly frozen, made into jam, fruit leather, fermented into wine, or even dried and ground into a powder. They can also be used in smoothies and drink recipes. When raw, Autumn olives pair well with yogurt and ice cream. When cooked, Autumn olives pair well with pork chops, chilled soups, and desserts such as crumbles. They will last for a couple of days when stored in a dry and well-ventilated space in the refrigerator. </span><br /><br /> <h2>Ethnic/Cultural Info</h2> <br /><span>Autumn olives are used as a key ingredient for health and wellness in Asia. Since it is native to the mountains of Eastern Asia, autumn olives are cultivated for their powerful antioxidants and are found in daily diets in Korea, China, and Japan. Traditional uses of Autumn olives include teas, wines, jams, and ground up into powder for medicine. </span><br /> <h2>Geography/History</h2> <span>Autumn olives originated in Asia with records in China, Japan, and Korea and have been growing since ancient times. They were then brought to the United States in 1830 and used as a solution to wildlife habitat and erosion control. Though it was an excellent solution to those needs, Autumn olives spread quickly and overtook many of the natural habitats earning itself the title of an invasive species. Today Autumn olives can also be found in Great Britain, Asia, Canada, and in the United States. </span></div> <div></div> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Pour hot water over the seeds and put them in water 6 hours.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 3-4 months in a moist substrate at 2-5 ° C in a refrigerator or cold house</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 20-23 ° C.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Germination takes up</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds Gallery 05.11.2012.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
V 5
Japanese Silverberry - Autumn Olive Seeds (Elaeagnus umbellata) 2.45 - 1
Sweetberry Honeysuckle Seeds Hardy -40C (Lonicera caerulea) 2.5 - 6

Sweetberry Honeysuckle...

Price €2.50
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Seeds Lonicera caerulea Blue-berried Honeysuckle Hardy -40C</strong></h2> <h2><strong style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></h2> <div>Lonicera caerulea (Blue-berried Honeysuckle or Sweetberry Honeysuckle) is a honeysuckle native throughout the cool temperate Northern Hemisphere.</div> <div>It is a deciduous shrub growing to 1.5-2 m tall. The leaves are opposite, oval, 3-8 cm long and 1-3 cm broad, glaucous green, with a slightly waxy texture. The flowers are yellowish-white, 12-16 mm long, with five equal lobes; they are produced in pairs on the shoots. The fruit is a blue berry about 1 cm diameter.</div> <div><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Propagation of Lonicera caerulea: </strong></span></div> <div><span style="color: #000000;">Stored seed requires 2 months cold stratification and should be sown as soon as possible in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 - 10cm with or without a heel, July/August in a frame. Good percentage. Cuttings of mature wood of the current season's growth, 15 - 20cm with or without a heel, November in a cold frame. Good percentage. Layering in autumn.</span></div> </body> </html>
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Sweetberry Honeysuckle Seeds Hardy -40C (Lonicera caerulea) 2.5 - 6
Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds...

Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds...

Price €4.00
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Carambola</b>, also known as<span>&nbsp;</span><b>star fruit</b>, is the fruit of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Averrhoa carambola</i>, a species of tree native to tropical<span>&nbsp;</span>Southeast Asia.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-0" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-0" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-Gepts_3-0" class="reference"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The fruit is commonly consumed throughout<span>&nbsp;</span>Southeast Asia, the<span>&nbsp;</span>South Pacific,<span>&nbsp;</span>Micronesia, parts of<span>&nbsp;</span>East Asia, and<span>&nbsp;</span>the Caribbean.<span>&nbsp;</span>The tree is cultivated throughout tropical areas of the world.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>The fruit has distinctive ridges running down its sides (usually 5–6).<span>&nbsp;</span>When cut in cross-section, it resembles a star, giving its name as<span>&nbsp;</span><i>star fruit</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-2" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-2" class="reference"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The entire fruit is edible, usually raw, and may be cooked or made into<span>&nbsp;</span>relishes, preserves,<span>&nbsp;</span>garnish, and juices.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Origins_and_distribution">Origins and distribution</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Carambolas765pt.jpg/220px-Carambolas765pt.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="177" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Carambolas765pt.jpg/330px-Carambolas765pt.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Carambolas765pt.jpg/440px-Carambolas765pt.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2277" data-file-height="1832" title="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Sliced carambolas having 7, 6, and the usual 5 points</div> </div> </div> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span>center of diversity<span>&nbsp;</span>and the original range of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Averrhoa carambola</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is tropical<span>&nbsp;</span>Southeast Asia, where it has been cultivated over centuries.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-4" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Gepts_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Duke_4-0" class="reference">[4]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Arora_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It was introduced to the<span>&nbsp;</span>Indian Subcontinent<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Sri Lanka<span>&nbsp;</span>by<span>&nbsp;</span>Austronesian<span>&nbsp;</span>traders, along with ancient Austronesian<span>&nbsp;</span>cultigens<span>&nbsp;</span>like<span>&nbsp;</span>coconuts,<span>&nbsp;</span>langsat,<span>&nbsp;</span>noni, and<span>&nbsp;</span>santol.<sup id="cite_ref-Blench2009_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>They remain common in those areas and in<span>&nbsp;</span>East Asia<span>&nbsp;</span>and throughout<span>&nbsp;</span>Oceania<span>&nbsp;</span>and the<span>&nbsp;</span>Pacific Islands.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-5" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-3" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>They are cultivated commercially in<span>&nbsp;</span>India, Southeast Asia, southern<span>&nbsp;</span>China,<span>&nbsp;</span>Taiwan, and the southern<span>&nbsp;</span>United States. They are also grown in<span>&nbsp;</span>Central America,<span>&nbsp;</span>South America, the<span>&nbsp;</span>Southwestern United States<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Florida,<span>&nbsp;</span>the Caribbean, and parts of<span>&nbsp;</span>Africa.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-6" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-4" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>They are grown as<span>&nbsp;</span>ornamentals.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-7" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Carambola is considered to be at risk of becoming an<span>&nbsp;</span>invasive species<span>&nbsp;</span>in many world regions.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-5" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p>The carambola tree has a short trunk with many branches, reaching up to 30 feet (9.1&nbsp;m) in height.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-8" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Its deciduous leaves are 6–10 inches (15–25&nbsp;cm) long, with 5 to 11<span>&nbsp;</span>ovate<span>&nbsp;</span>leaflets medium-green in color.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-9" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Flowers are<span>&nbsp;</span>lilac<span>&nbsp;</span>in color, with purple streaks, and are about 0.25 inches (6.4&nbsp;mm) wide.</p> <p>The showy fruits have a thin, waxy<span>&nbsp;</span>pericarp, orange-yellow skin, and crisp, yellow flesh with juice when ripe.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-10" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The fruit is about 5 to 15 centimetres (2 to 6 inches) in length and is an oval shape. It usually has five or six prominent longitudinal ridges.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-11" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In cross section, it resembles a star.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-12" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-6" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The flesh is translucent and light yellow to yellow in color. Each fruit can have 10 to 12 flat light brown seeds about 6 to 13&nbsp;mm (0.25 to 0.5&nbsp;in) in width and enclosed in gelatinous<span>&nbsp;</span>aril. Once removed from the fruit, they lose viability within a few days.<sup id="cite_ref-crfg_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-0" class="reference">[8]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-fi_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup></p> <p>Like the closely related<span>&nbsp;</span>bilimbi, there are two main types of carambola: the small sour (or tart) type and the larger sweet type. The sour varieties have a higher<span>&nbsp;</span>oxalic acid<span>&nbsp;</span>content than the sweet type. A number of cultivars have been developed in recent years. The most common cultivars grown commercially include the sweet types "Arkin" (Florida), "Yang Tao" (Taiwan), "Ma fueng" (Thailand), "Maha" (Malaysia), and "Demak" (Indonesia) and the sour types "Golden Star", "Newcomb", "Star King", and "Thayer" (all from Florida). Some of the sour varieties like "Golden Star" can become sweet if allowed to ripen.<sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Common_names">Common names</span></h3> <p>Carambola is known by many names across its regions of cultivation, including<span>&nbsp;</span><i>balimbing</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in Southeast Asia,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>ma fen</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in China,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>kamaranga</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in India, and<span>&nbsp;</span><i>carambolo</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in Spanish-speaking countries, as examples.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-14" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-7" class="reference">[2]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary">Culinary</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3a/Carambola_Starfruit.jpg/220px-Carambola_Starfruit.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="111" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3a/Carambola_Starfruit.jpg/330px-Carambola_Starfruit.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3a/Carambola_Starfruit.jpg/440px-Carambola_Starfruit.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2578" data-file-height="1300"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Vertical, end view, and cross section of the ripe carambola</div> </div> </div> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Carambola, (star fruit), raw</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100&nbsp;g (3.5&nbsp;oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>128&nbsp;kJ (31&nbsp;kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>6.73 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sugars</th> <td>3.98 g</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>2.8 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>0.33 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>1.04 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin A equiv. <div>lutein<span>&nbsp;</span>zeaxanthin</div> </th> <td> <div>66 μg</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine (B<span>1</span>)</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.014 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin (B<span>2</span>)</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.016 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin (B<span>3</span>)</th> <td> <div>2%</div> 0.367 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid (B<span>5</span>)</th> <td> <div>8%</div> 0.391 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>6</span></th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.017 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate (B<span>9</span>)</th> <td> <div>3%</div> 12 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Choline</th> <td> <div>2%</div> 7.6 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>41%</div> 34.4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin E</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.15 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>0%</div> 3 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.08 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>3%</div> 10 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>2%</div> 0.037 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>2%</div> 12 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>3%</div> 133 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>0%</div> 2 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.12 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Other constituents</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Water</th> <td>91.4 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr> <div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span>&nbsp;</span>micrograms&nbsp;• mg =<span>&nbsp;</span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span>&nbsp;</span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span>&nbsp;</span>US&nbsp;recommendations<span>&nbsp;</span>for adults.<br><span class="nowrap">Source:<span>&nbsp;</span>USDA Nutrient Database</span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The entire fruit is edible, including the slightly waxy skin. The flesh is crunchy, firm, and extremely juicy.<sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-8" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It does not contain fibers and has a texture similar in consistency to that of<span>&nbsp;</span>grapes. Carambolas are best consumed shortly after they ripen, when they are yellow with a light shade of green or just after all traces of green have disappeared. They will also have brown ridges at the edges and feel firm. Fruits picked while still slightly green will turn yellow in storage at room temperature, but will not increase in sugar content. Overripe carambola will be yellow with brown spots and can become blander in taste and soggier in consistency.<sup id="cite_ref-buzzle_10-0" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>Ripe sweet type carambolas are sweet without being overwhelming as they rarely have more than 4% sugar content. They have a tart, sour undertone, and an oxalic acid odor. The taste is difficult to match, but it has been compared to a mix of<span>&nbsp;</span>apple,<span>&nbsp;</span>pear,<span>&nbsp;</span>grape, and<span>&nbsp;</span>citrus family<span>&nbsp;</span>fruits. Unripe star fruits are firmer and sour, and taste like green apples.<sup id="cite_ref-fg_11-0" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>Ripe carambolas may also be used in cooking. In Southeast Asia, they are usually stewed in<span>&nbsp;</span>cloves<span>&nbsp;</span>and sugar, sometimes with<span>&nbsp;</span>apples. In China, they are cooked with fish. In Australia, they may be cooked as a vegetable, pickled, or made into jams. In<span>&nbsp;</span>Jamaica<span>&nbsp;</span>they are sometimes dried.</p> <p>Unripe and sour type carambolas can be mixed with other chopped spices to make relishes in Australia.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-16" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In the Philippines, unripe carambolas are eaten dipped in<span>&nbsp;</span>rock salt.<span>&nbsp;</span>In Thailand, they are cooked together with shrimp.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-17" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>The juice from carambolas is also used in iced drinks, particularly the juice of the sour varieties. In the Philippines they can be used as seasoning. In India, the juice is bottled for drinking.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrition">Nutrition</span></h3> <p>Raw carambola is 91% water, 7%<span>&nbsp;</span>carbohydrates, 1%<span>&nbsp;</span>protein, and has negligible<span>&nbsp;</span>fat<span>&nbsp;</span>(table). A 100 gram reference amount of raw fruit supplies 31<span>&nbsp;</span>calories<span>&nbsp;</span>and a rich content of<span>&nbsp;</span>vitamin C<span>&nbsp;</span>(41% of the<span>&nbsp;</span>Daily Value), with no other<span>&nbsp;</span>micronutrients<span>&nbsp;</span>in significant content (table).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Health_risks">Health risks</span></h2> <p>Carambolas contain<span>&nbsp;</span>caramboxin<sup id="cite_ref-auto_13-0" class="reference">[13]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>oxalic acid.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-19" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-muthu_14-0" class="reference">[14]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Both substances are harmful to individuals suffering from<span>&nbsp;</span>kidney failure,<span>&nbsp;</span>kidney stones, or those under<span>&nbsp;</span>kidney dialysis<span>&nbsp;</span>treatment.<sup id="cite_ref-muthu_14-1" class="reference">[14]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Consumption by those with kidney failure can produce<span>&nbsp;</span>hiccups, vomiting, nausea, mental confusion, and sometimes death.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Neto2003_16-0" class="reference">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference">[17]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Caramboxin is a<span>&nbsp;</span>neurotoxin<span>&nbsp;</span>which is structurally similar to<span>&nbsp;</span>phenylalanine, and is a<span>&nbsp;</span>glutamatergic<span>&nbsp;</span>agonist.<sup id="cite_ref-auto_13-1" class="reference">[13]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Drug_interactions">Drug interactions</span></h3> <p>Like the<span>&nbsp;</span>grapefruit, carambola is considered to be a potent inhibitor of seven<span>&nbsp;</span>cytochrome P450<span>&nbsp;</span>isoforms.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>These enzymes are significant in the<span>&nbsp;</span>first-pass elimination<span>&nbsp;</span>of many medications, and, thus, the consumption of carambola or its juice in combination with certain prescription medications can significantly increase their effective dosage within the body.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg/220px-Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="146" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg/330px-Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg/440px-Carambola_star_fruit_at_organic_food_mela_Bangalore_Karnataka_India.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2048" data-file-height="1360" title="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Unripe Indian carambola</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7d/Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg/220px-Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7d/Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg/330px-Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7d/Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg/440px-Sliced_Indian_Carambola_Star_fruit_with_Indian_spices.jpg 2x" data-file-width="1280" data-file-height="960" title="Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Ripe carambola fruit with Indian spices</div> </div> </div> <p>The carambola is a tropical and subtropical fruit which can be grown at elevations up to 1,200 metres (4,000 feet). It prefers full sun exposure, but requires enough humidity and annual rainfall of at least 1,800&nbsp;mm (70&nbsp;in).<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-20" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-cabi_2-9" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>It does not have a soil type preference, but will thrive in<span>&nbsp;</span>loam<span>&nbsp;</span>and requires good drainage.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-21" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Moderate irrigation supports its growth during dry seasons.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-22" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Heavy rains may inhibit fruit production.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-23" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>Carambola trees are planted at least 6&nbsp;m (20&nbsp;ft) from each other and typically are fertilized three times a year. The tree grows rapidly and typically produces fruit at four or five years of age. The large amount of rain during spring actually reduces the amount of fruit, but, in ideal conditions, carambola can produce from 90 to 180 kilograms (200 to 400 pounds) of fruit a year. The carambola tree flowers throughout the year, with main fruiting seasons from April to June and October to December in Malaysia,<sup id="cite_ref-ippc_20-0" class="reference">[20]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>for example, but fruiting also occurs at other times in some other locales, such as South Florida.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-24" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-3" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>Growth and leaf responses of container-grown `Arkin' carambola (<i>Averrhoa carambola</i><span>&nbsp;</span>L.) trees to long-term exposure of 25%, 50%, or 100% sunlight showed that shading increased<span>&nbsp;</span>rachis<span>&nbsp;</span>length and leaflet area, decreased leaflet thickness, and produced more horizontal branch orientation.<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup></p> <p>Major pests are<span>&nbsp;</span>carambola fruit flies, fruit moths, ants, and birds.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-25" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-crfg_7-3" class="reference">[7]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-ippc_20-1" class="reference">[20]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Crops are also susceptible to frost.<sup id="cite_ref-crfg_7-4" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>Top producers of carambola in the world market include Australia,<span>&nbsp;</span>Guyana, India,<span>&nbsp;</span>Israel,<span>&nbsp;</span>Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan, and the United States.<sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-4" class="reference">[8]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Malaysia is a global leader in star fruit production by volume and ships the product widely to Asia and Europe.<sup id="cite_ref-ippc_20-2" class="reference">[20]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Due to concerns over pests and pathogens, however, whole star fruits cannot yet be imported to the US from Malaysia under current<span>&nbsp;</span>United States Department of Agriculture<span>&nbsp;</span>regulations. In the United States, carambolas are grown in tropical and semitropical areas, including Texas, South Carolina, Louisiana, California, Virginia, Florida and Hawaii.<sup id="cite_ref-jm_1-26" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-bilj_22-0" class="reference">[22]</sup></p> <p>In the United States, commercial cultivation and broad consumer acceptance of the fruit only dates to the 1970s, attributable to<span>&nbsp;</span>Morris Arkin, a backyard<span>&nbsp;</span>horticulturalist, in<span>&nbsp;</span>Coral Gables, Florida. The 'Arkin' variety represented 98% of the acreage in South Florida in the early 21st century.<sup id="cite_ref-knight_23-0" class="reference">[23]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Other_uses">Other uses</span></h2> <p>The trees are also grown as ornamentals for their abundant brightly colored and unusually shaped fruits, as well as for their attractive dark green leaves and their lavender to pink flowers.<sup id="cite_ref-crane_8-5" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>Like the<span>&nbsp;</span>bilimbi, the juice of the more acidic sour types can be used to clean<span>&nbsp;</span>rusty<span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span>tarnished<span>&nbsp;</span>metal (especially<span>&nbsp;</span>brass) as well as bleach rust stains from cloth. They may also be used as a<span>&nbsp;</span>mordant<span>&nbsp;</span>in<span>&nbsp;</span>dyeing.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 9 AC (2 S)
Carambola, Star Fruit Seeds (Averrhoa carambola)
Sugar Apple, Cherimoya Seeds (Annona cherimola)  - 6

Sugar Apple, Cherimoya...

Price €4.25
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sugar Apple, Cherimoya Seeds (Annona cherimola)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Also known as Sugar Apple, Chirimoya. Mark Twain once referred to the cherimoya as "the most delicious fruit known to men." Although its flavor is often likened to that of a cross between a banana and a pineapple, the flesh of this exotic fruit has also been described as similar to commercial bubblegum. Although they are native to the Andes, cherimoyas also thrive in Mediterranean climates and have been introduced in Spain, Italy, and California, among other places.</p> <p>Trees are fast-growing, producing fruit from seed in 3-4 years. The cherimoya is subtropical and when full-grown can survive to 25F (USDA: 10a-11). Young trees are susceptible to frost. </p> <p>Note: Due to the origin at altitudes up to 1,900 m, temperatures down to -6 ° C are tolerated.</p> <h2><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></h2> <ul><li>Pretreat: pour hot water over the seeds + soak about 24-48 h</li> <li>Sowing Time: all year round</li> <li>Sowing Depth: 1 cm</li> <li>Sowing Mix: Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</li> <li>Germination temperature: 25 ° C +</li> <li>Location: bright + keep constantly moist not wet</li> <li>Germination Time: about 2-6 weeks</li> </ul>
V 10 AC
Sugar Apple, Cherimoya Seeds (Annona cherimola)  - 6

Seeds Exotic Garcinia indica Kokum butter tree, Mangosteen

Kokum - Mangosteen Seeds...

Price €3.95
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Kokum butter tree, Mangosteen </strong><strong>Seeds (Garcinia indica)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Kokum is an exotic tree with a dense canopy of green leaves and red-tinged tender emerging leaves. It is indigenous to the Western Ghats region of India, along the western coast. The tree is large and handsome, having elliptic, oblong or oblong-lanceolate, deep-green glossy leaves, 5.5-8 cm long and 2.5-3 cm broad.</p> <p>The flowers are fleshy, dark pink, solitary, or in spreading cluster. The fruit is brownish or brownish-gray, marbled with yellow, and is crowned by the 4-parted, stalkless stigma. There are from 6 to 8 seeds, and the pulp is juicy, white, and delicious in taste and odor. It is about the size of an orange. An average kokum tree bears hundreds of fruits during summer. When they are tender, they are green in color. As they ripen, they get a beautiful purple color.</p> <p>The fruits are plucked when they are ripe. The tree is a source of kokum butter which is used in cosmetics and confectionery.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_uses">Culinary uses</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Seeds Garcinia indica Kokum butter tree, Mangosteen" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Kokumfruitsdried.jpg/220px-Kokumfruitsdried.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="151" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Kokumfruitsdried.jpg/330px-Kokumfruitsdried.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Kokumfruitsdried.jpg/440px-Kokumfruitsdried.jpg 2x" data-file-width="1992" data-file-height="1368" title="Seeds Garcinia indica Kokum butter tree, Mangosteen" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> The dried skin of kokum fruits</div> </div> </div> <p>The outer cover of fruit is dried in the sun to get<span> </span><i>aamsul</i><span> </span>or<span> </span><i>kokam</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-Kokum_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>It is used as a souring agent typically in<span> </span>Maharashtrian cuisine,<span> </span>Goan cuisine, and in some parts of<span> </span>Karnataka. Kokum yields a peculiar flavour and deep-red colour. As a souring agent, it is used as an alternative to<span> </span>tamarind<span> </span>in curries and other dishes from south India.<sup id="cite_ref-Peter2001_4-1" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>It is also used in cuisine from<span> </span>Gujarat, where it is frequently used to add flavor and tartness to<span> </span>dal<span> </span>(lentil soup) for flavor balance. It is extensively used in Assamese cuisine in many dishes like<span> </span><i>masor tenga</i><span> </span>(sour fish curry) and<span> </span><i>tenga dali</i><span> </span>(sour dal).</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Seeds Garcinia indica Kokum butter tree, Mangosteen" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f4/Garcinia_indica_syrup_making_from_rinds.jpg/220px-Garcinia_indica_syrup_making_from_rinds.jpg" decoding="async" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f4/Garcinia_indica_syrup_making_from_rinds.jpg/330px-Garcinia_indica_syrup_making_from_rinds.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f4/Garcinia_indica_syrup_making_from_rinds.jpg/440px-Garcinia_indica_syrup_making_from_rinds.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2288" data-file-height="1712" title="Seeds Garcinia indica Kokum butter tree, Mangosteen" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> The vessel on the left contains syrup which is obtained from the vessel containing kokum rinds, on the right. The syrup is used to make kokum sherbet.</div> </div> </div> <p>The fresh fruit is preserved with sugar to make bright-red<span> </span>squash<span> </span>that is diluted with water and bottled for sale as a beverage.</p> <p>The extract of the fruit is called<span> </span><i>aagul</i><span> </span>in<span> </span>Konkani<span> </span>and<span> </span>Marathi. It is added during the preparation of<span> </span><i>solkadhi</i>, which may also include<span> </span>coconut milk, coriander and garlic.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Industrial_uses">Industrial uses</span></h3> <p>The seed of<span> </span><i>Garcinia Indica</i><span> </span>contains 23–26%<span> </span>Kokum butter, which remains solid at room temperature. It is used in the preparation of chocolate and sugar confectionery.<sup id="cite_ref-Rajah2002_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Medicinal_and_cosmetics_applications">Medicinal and cosmetics applications</span></h3> <p>The oily extract called Kukum butter is used in ointments and suppositories.<sup id="cite_ref-Peter2001_4-2" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>It has application in skin and hair products, acne products and skin tonics.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>The rind of the fruit is a good source of<span> </span>hydroxycitric acid<span> </span>which has been claimed to modify lipid metabolism.<sup id="cite_ref-Peter2001_4-3" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Other_uses">Other uses</span></h3> <p>The tree is ornamental, with a dense canopy of green leaves and red-tinged, tender, young leaves.</p> <p> </p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 25-27 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 3-8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">abundant water in the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
V 17
Seeds Exotic Garcinia indica Kokum butter tree, Mangosteen
Sweet Tropical Carica Papaya-pawpaw Seeds

Papaya, Papaw, or Pawpaw...

Price €2.25
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Papaya, Papaw, or Pawpaw Seeds (Carica papaya)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Papaya (Carica papaya L.) - Deliciously sweet with musky undertones and a soft, butter-like consistency, it is no wonder the papaya was reputably called the "fruit of the angels" by Christopher Columbus. Once considered quite exotic, they can now be found in markets throughout the year. Although there is a slight seasonal peak in early summer and fall, papaya trees produce fruit year-round. </p> <p>Papayas are fruits that remind us of the tropics, the regions of the world in which they are grown. Once considered an exotic fruit, papayas' rise in popularity has made them much more available. Papaya fruits are good sources of Vitamin A, B and C. </p> <p>Papayas are spherical or pear-shaped fruits that can be as long as 20 inches. The ones commonly found in the market usually average about 7 inches and weigh about one pound. Their flesh is a rich orange color with either yellow or pink hues. </p> <p>Papaya has a wonderfully soft, butter-like consistency and a deliciously sweet, musky taste. Inside the inner cavity of the fruit are black, round seeds encased in a gelatinous-like substance. Papaya's seeds are edible, although their peppery flavor is somewhat bitter. </p> <p>The fruit, as well as the other parts of the papaya tree, contain papain, an enzyme that helps digest proteins. This enzyme is especially concentrated in the fruit when it is unripe. Papain is extracted to make digestive enzyme dietary supplements and is also used as an ingredient in some chewing gums. </p> <h2><strong>How To Grow Papaya From Seed</strong></h2> <p>Select a sunny and sheltered place in your garden. That's right, in your garden. Don't start them in pots!</p> <p>Papayas don't transplant well. Anything that disturbs the roots of papayas really sets them back. They just hate it. The most foolproof way to grow papayas is to simply plant them where they are to live.</p> <p>Papaya trees are very, very hungry. That means they need very good soil, rich in organic matter and nutrients.</p> <p>If you don't have fabulous soil, make some. Dig a hole half a meter across and fill it with a mix of good compost and soil. Actually, make at least two or three such planting beds in different locations.</p> <p>Now sprinkle on some of your seeds. A couple of dozen per bed is a good amount. Cover the seeds lightly with more compost, and then mulch the patch well. The seeds usually take about a couple of weeks to germinate, and may take longer.</p> <p>Soon you will notice that your seedlings are very different in size and vigor. That's why we planted so many. Start culling the weaker ones. Pull them out while still small, or cut bigger ones down to the ground. Only keep the very best.</p> <p>At this stage you should keep about half a dozen plants. Papaya plants can be male, female, or bisexual, and you want to make sure that you have some females or bisexual plants amongst your seedlings. The male papayas don't bear fruit.</p> <p>Papayas start flowering when they are about one meter tall. The male's flower first. Male flowers have long, thin stalks with several small blooms. Female flowers are usually single blooms, bigger, and very close to the trunk. </p> <p>Cull most of the male plants. You only need one male for every ten to fifteen female plants to ensure good pollination.</p> <p>And that's it. You should end up with one very strong and healthy female plant per bed. (And a male plant somewhere...) If the weather is warm enough, and if you are growing your papayas in full sun and in good soil, then you could be picking the first ripe fruit within 10 months.</p> <p><strong>How much water?</strong></p> <p>Papayas have large soft leaves. They evaporate a lot of water in warm weather, so they need a lot of water. But unfortunately, papayas are very susceptible to root rot, especially in cool weather. Overwatering is the most common reason for problems when growing papayas.</p> <p>It depends on the temperature and on the overall health and vigor of the plant. A healthier plant will cope better, but in general you should be careful not to overwater during periods of cool weather.</p> <p><strong>Growing Papaya In Cooler Climates</strong></p> <p>If you get at least long hot summers you could grow papaya just as an ornamental plant. In this case you would start them in a pot indoors to gain extra time. Plant them out against a sun-facing wall and enjoy the tropical look. However, you won't be able to keep your papaya alive long enough to get fruit.</p> <p>The only other option is growing papaya in a huge pot, and to keep the pot in a heated greenhouse in winter. You may also grow papaya as an annual decorative plant.</p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">about 25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">regular watering during the growth period + dry between waterings</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table></div>
V 22 N
Sweet Tropical Carica Papaya-pawpaw Seeds
Spanish Cherry Seeds 2.95 - 1

Spanish Cherry Seeds

Price €2.95
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Spanish Cherry Seeds (Mimusops elengi)</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><strong style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></h3> <div>Mimusops elengi Maulsari is a medium-sized evergreen tree found in tropical forests in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Northern Australia. English common names include Spanish cherry, Medlar, and Bullet wood. In Hindi Maulsari. Its timber is valuable, the fruit is edible, and it has traditional medicinal uses.</div> <p>Its flower is the provincial flower of Yala province, Thailand.</p> <p><strong>Tree description</strong></p> <p>Bullet wood is an evergreen tree reaching a height of about 16 m. It flowers in April, and fruiting occurs in June. Leaves are glossy, dark green, oval shaped, 5–14 cm long and 2.5–6 cm wide. Flowers are cream, hairy and scented. Bark is thick and appears dark brownish black or grayish black in colour, with striations and a few cracks on the surface. The tree may reach up to a height of 9–18 m with about 1 m in circumference.</p> <p><strong>Ayurvedic uses </strong></p> <p>The bark, flowers, fruits and seeds are astringent, cooling, anthelmintic, tonic, and febrifuge. It is mainly used in dental ailments like bleeding gums, pyorrhea, dental caries and loose teeth.</p> <p>Extract of flowers used against heart diseases, leucorrhoea, menorrhagia and act as antiduretic in polyuria and antitoxin. The snuff made from the dried and powdered flowers used in a disease called Ahwa in which strong fever, headache and pain in the neck, shoulders and other parts of the body occurs.</p> <p>Ripened fruits facilitates to cure burning urination. The ripe fruit pounded and mixed with water is given to promote delivery in childbirth. Powder of dried flowers is a brain tonic and useful as a snuff to relieve cephalalgia. Decoction of bark is used to wash the wounds.</p> <p><strong>Other uses</strong></p> <p>The edible fruit is softly hairy becoming smooth, ovoid, bright red-orange when ripe.</p> <p>The wood is a luxurious wood that is extremely hard, strong and tough, and rich deep red in color. The heart wood is sharply defined from the sapwood. It works easily and takes a beautiful polish. Weight is 1008 kg per cubic meter.</p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">1-2 cm.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">3 - 6 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table></div>
V 91
Spanish Cherry Seeds 2.95 - 1
American persimmon seeds (Diospyros virginiana)

American persimmon seeds...

Price €3.50
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>American persimmon seeds&nbsp;(Diospyros virginiana)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <div>The American persimmon produces a large crop of sweet edible fruit with very little attention but also produces valuable timber and is great for bees and therefore for honey production. The persimmon is easy to grow with fast growth until fruiting commences.</div> <div>&nbsp;It will grow to a height of about 15ft in the first 5 years. It prefers deep, loamy, well-drained soil, but will tolerate any soil that is not waterlogged. The tree is drought-resistant.<br><br></div> <div>The American Indian used the fruit in gruel, cornbread, and puddings and with honey locust pods, made an alcoholic beverage.</div> <div>The American persimmon mixed with cornmeal can be brewed into "Simmon beer". Vinegar could also be made with this fruit.</div> <div class="">&nbsp;The fruit can provide a self-feeding fodder crop for livestock. All livestock enjoy the ripe fruit as they fall from the tree. They are also popular with wildlife.<br><br></div> <div>Good fruiting trees can be grown from the seeds. Fruiting begins and continues for fifty years or more.</div> <div>&nbsp;The tree is hardy to -29 C.</div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in water&nbsp;for 24 hours&nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">3 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 - 2,5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">until it germinates&nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
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American persimmon seeds (Diospyros virginiana)