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There are 214 products.

Showing 1-15 of 214 item(s)

Variety from Hungary
The Hungarian chilli Seeds "Ceruza erős paprika" 1.85 - 1

Hungarian chilli Seeds...

Price €1.85 - SKU: C 115
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>The Hungarian chilli Seeds "Ceruza erős paprika"</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>We have this beautiful chili in two colors, please choose under option color yellow or red color.</p> <p>Old variety from Hungary, which is mostly used for drying and stringing. The fruits were 10-12 cm long, wide about 0.5 to 1 cm. This variety is extremely hot. The fruits change their color from green to red when ripe.</p> <p>Plants usually reach a height of 50-60 cm and are ideal for holding potted, and production for all year round.</p> </body> </html>
C 115 CM R
The Hungarian chilli Seeds "Ceruza erős paprika" 1.85 - 1

Variety from Serbia
Somborka hot bell pepper seeds

Somborka hot bell pepper seeds

Price €1.85 - SKU: P 183
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>SOMBORKA hot bell pepper seeds - Serbian variety</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 or 200 (1,14 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This variety comes from Serbia. And the name has gotten to the city of <strong>Sombor</strong>. Read more about <strong><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sombor" target="_blank" title="Read more about Sombor city here" rel="noreferrer noopener">Sombor</a><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sombor" target="_blank" title="Read more about Sombor city here" rel="noreferrer noopener"> city here</a>.</strong></p> <p>SOMBORKA is the earliest variety of hot paprika with a conical shape that is suitable for growing outdoors as well as in a greenhouse. Somborka is the most popular pepper in Serbia when it comes to pickling.</p> <p>The meat is juicy and thick, light yellow in technical maturity, red in botanical color.</p> <p>It is harvested 5-6 times a season. Possible yield is 35-40 t / ha.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Serbian variety</strong></span></p> </body> </html>
P 183 20S
Somborka hot bell pepper seeds
Chinese Green Luobo Radish Seeds

Chinese Green Luobo Radish...

Price €2.45 - SKU: P 406
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Chinese Green Luobo Radish Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#f40707;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Green Meat radishes are easily distinguished by their shape and color. The swollen and elongated taproot is two-toned like several radish varieties, yet it is unique in its coloring. Its upper half near the stem end is lime green colored, and its tapered lower half is cream colored. It can be harvested when as small as five inches or as large as ten inches. Its thick skin covers a green to creamy white flesh which offers a crisp texture and a radish flavor that can vary from mild to hot depending upon growing conditions and maturity.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Current Facts</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Green Meat radish (Raphanus sativus) is an heirloom variety radish and a member of the Brassicaceae or Cruciferae family along with arugula, broccoli, and turnips. The entire plant is edible, roots and leaves. Green radishes such as the Green Meat can be found sold under a variety of different names including green skinned, tsingato green, Japanese minowase, and Chinense green luobo.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Seasons/Availability</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Green Meat radish is available in the spring and fall months.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Nutritional Value</span></strong></p> <p><span>Similar to red radishes, green radishes such as the Green Meat radish contain a significant amount of vitamin C, though less than their red relatives. Green type radishes are higher in carotenoids, proanthocyanidins, and chlorophylls than red varieties. The greens of the Green Meat radish additionally are high in nutrients, even more so than the radish root itself.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Applications</span></strong></p> <p><span>The spicy flavor and crisp texture of the Green Meat radish shines in fresh preparations. Slice thin and add to sandwiches, salads or wraps. Use to add a spicy accent to tacos, nachos, and Mexican soups. Slice lengthwise and pair with cream based dips or soft cheeses. Grate and serve as a condiment with sushi or sashimi or add to slaws to give them a spicy kick. In China Green Meat radishes are popularly pickled along with Sichuan peppers. Green Meat radish greens can be added to soups and stir-fries. To store, keep Green Meat radishes refrigerated and used within one to two weeks.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Ethnic/Cultural Info</span></strong></p> <p><span>In China, many radishes such as the Green Meat radish are used in traditional Chinese medicine, believed to promote health and wellness particularly related to the respiratory system. This is reflected in the ancient Chinese proverb which states, "Eating pungent radish and drinking hot tea, let the starved doctors beg on their knees." Radishes have long held such a high place of esteem in Chinese culture, the Quingdao Radish Festival dates back to the Ming Dynasty nearly 600 years ago and is an annual celebration of the radish and Chinese folklore which encourages eating radish on the ninth day of the lunar new year for good health.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Geography/History</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Green Meat radish is believed to be a relative of a traditional green Chinese radish native to northern China. Originally known by the name Chinese Green Luobo or Qingluobo these green radishes like many other Asian radishes such as the daikon are harvested at a larger size than European radishes. Green radishes are a popular variety in Asian countries and have just in recent years begun to gain in popularity in the United States. Like most radish varieties the Green Meat grows best in mild climates and is not heat tolerant.</span></p>
P 406
Chinese Green Luobo Radish Seeds

Variety from Korea
YEOLMU Korean Young Summer Radish Seeds 2.049999 - 1

YEOLMU Korean Young Summer...

Price €2.05 - SKU: P 446
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>YEOLMU Korean Young Summer Radish Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 25 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Yeolmu (열무) or young summer radish is a type of leafy radish cultivated in Korea. Its taproots and greens are harvested when they are still soft and tender.</p> <p>It can be harvested between 40 and 50 days after sowing and is easy to maintain. It is strong against viruses, nosocomial disease.</p> <p>These spicy and beautiful vegetables grow incredibly quickly from seed. They don’t grow very deep, so you can grow them in a relatively shallow container (4 inches deep is the minimum for most radishes). Yeolmu mul kimchi (which the main ingredient is young radish) is usually eaten in summer in Korea. Making Bibimbap with barley rice, doenjang jjigae, yeolmu kimchi, hot pepper paste and sesame oil is one of the most popular and delicious dinners in hot summer where the stem of the young radish is used.</p>
P 446
YEOLMU Korean Young Summer Radish Seeds 2.049999 - 1

Best seller product

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.

Variety from Japan
Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1

Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus...

Price €4.15 - SKU: V 118 Y
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 or 4 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The fruit looks somewhat like a small grapefruit with an uneven skin, and can be either yellow or green depending on the degree of ripeness. It is hardy to <strong>-20C.</strong></p> <p>Yuzu limes are small to medium in size, averaging 5-10 centimeters in diameter, and are round, oblate, to slightly lopsided in shape. The peel is thick, pebbly, rough, pocked with many prominent oil glands and pores, and matures from dark green to golden yellow. Underneath the peel, the yellow flesh is minimal, divided into 9-10 segments by white membranes, contains some juice, and is filled with many large, inedible cream-colored seeds. Yuzu limes are highly aromatic, and the rind is rich in essential oils that are released when the fruit’s surface is scratched or cut. The juice and zest also have a unique, acidic blend of sour, tart, and spicy flavors with notes of lime, grapefruit, mandarin. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Seasons/Availability</h2> <p><br />Yuzu limes are available in the winter through the early spring. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Current Facts</h2> <p><br />Yuzu limes, botanically classified as Citrus junos, are slow-growing citrus that are found on an evergreen tree or shrub that can reach over five meters in height and belongs to the Rutaceae family. Believed to be a hybrid between the satsuma mandarin and the ichang papeda, Yuzu limes are not botanically a lime but have earned the title since they are often prepared and used similarly. Yuzu limes are mainly cultivated in China, Japan, and Korea and are favored for their tart and spicy juice and zest. They are also valued for their strong fragrance and in Japan, it is one of the most popular scents to be used for cosmetics, candles, cleaning supplies, and bath products. While popular in Asia, Yuzu limes are still relatively unknown in the Western world, but they have been gaining awareness through famous chefs praising and using its unique flavor. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Nutritional Value</h2> <p><br />Yuzu limes are an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C. They also contain flavonoids, vitamin P which can help absorb other nutrients and increase circulation, and nomilin, which can help aid the body in relaxation. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Applications</h2> <p><br />Yuzu limes are best suited for both raw and cooked applications and are used for their juice and zest. When juiced, Yuzu limes can be mixed into sauces, vinegar, dressings, and marinades, or they can be shaken into cocktails, flavored water, and tea. Yuzu lime peels can also be used to flavor salted butter for seafood dishes, zested over salad or sashimi, used to flavor ponzu sauce, or ground into powdered form and sprinkled over dishes as a concentrated flavor. In addition to savory dishes, Yuzu lime juice and zest can be baked into tarts or pies, mixed into sorbets, or used in custard. Yuzu limes pair well with coriander, mint, eggs, sashimi, scallops, grilled fish, snow crab, poultry, steak, pork, pepper, black sesame seeds, cumin, lime, raspberry, pomegranate, and cherries. The fruits will keep two weeks when stored in the refrigerator. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Ethnic/Cultural Info</h2> <p><br />In Japan, the Yuzu lime is one of the most popular fragrances and is most well-known for its use in the winter solstice bath. Each year during the winter solstice, public bathhouses will slice the fruit in half and float them in hot water, creating an aromatic experience. This bathing practice dates back to the 18th century and soaking in Yuzu water is believed to help prevent sicknesses such as flu and colds, and the essential oils and vitamin C are believed to help soften the skin and relieve pain. In addition to bathing, the Yuzu fragrance is also utilized in Yuzu tama or Yuzu egg production. On the island of Shikoku, Japan, farmers feed their hens a mixture of Yuzu peel, sesame seeds, corn, and kale to naturally create an egg that has the flavor and scent of the Yuzu lime. These eggs are sold at a premium price and are traditionally used for tamago kake gohan, which is cooked rice with a raw egg mixed in. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Geography/History</h2> <p><br />The origins of Yuzu limes are somewhat disputed among scientists, but the majority of scientists conclude that the fruit’s origins are within the upper regions of the Yangtze River in China and have been growing since ancient times. Yuzu limes were then introduced to Japan in 710 CE where they became increasingly popular for their light scent. In 1914, Frank Meyer, the man who discovered the Meyer lemon, visited China and brought seeds from the Yuzu fruit back to the United States. Included in his description of the fruit, he noted that he sourced the seeds from the Hubei Provence along the upper slopes of the Yangtze River at an astonishing elevation of 4,000 feet. The temperatures dip below freezing in that area, and there are no other citrus varieties that grow near the region. Today Yuzu limes are predominately available at local markets in Asia, but there are also a few farms in the United States that commercially cultivate the fruit and sell at farmers markets and specialty grocers</p> </body> </html>
V 118 Y 2-S
Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1
Bitter Melon Seeds...

Bitter Melon Seeds...

Price €1.75 - SKU: V 7
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Seeds Bitter Melon, Bitter Gourd, Balsam Pear (Momordica Charantia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price per pack of 5, 10, 50, 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>If the Balsam Pear did not exist a pharmaceutical company would invent it.  In fact, there have been some ten studies published this past year about it, the latest as of this writing in February 2008 in the Journal of Food Biochemistry about its potential in diabetes treatment.</p> <p>A very common, bitter vegetable in Asian cuisine,  the Balsam Pear, Momordica charantia,  is a natural drug store for diabetics and others. It’s not a pear at all but a fruiting gourd and vine that smells like an old, well-used gym shoe. Don’t say you weren’t warned.</p> <div>The warty gourd is edible when green (and cooked) but turns toxic when orange ripe. It then splits characteristically into three parts, revealing red arils (fleshy seed covers).  The ripe seeds inside the arils and orange flesh of the gourd are toxic and can make one violently lose fluids from both ends, and induce abortions. The red arils around the seeds, however, are edible. And notice this: The arils are 96% lycopene, which gives them their color. Just remember to spit out the seed from each aril.</div> <div>M. charantia is found Connecticut south to Florida, west to Texas, also Puerto Rico and the Hawaiian Islands. Incidentally, the bitter melon has twice the potassium of bananas and is also rich in vitamin A and C.</div> <div> </div> <div>The Latin genus name, Momordica, (mo-MOR-dee-ka)  means “to bite,” and refers to the jagged edges of the leaves, which appear as if they have been bitten. Charantia (char-AN-tee-ah) the species’ name, comes from Greek meaning beautiful flower.  It’s native to tropical regions of the world though no one knows where it came from originally. Gray’s four-inch thick Manual of Botany, started in 1850 and revised in 1950, makes no mention of M. charantia in the United States but it is currently a serious crop weed in Florida and to 21 other crops around the world, bananas to soybeans. It’s a late comer to Florida or Gray was in the dark about it. In the Amazon, and as far away as India, it is used very much by local populations for food and medicine.  Apparently a  dynamic chemical factory, the M. charantia is being tested for treatment against cancer — leukemia in particular —  AIDS, as an analgesic, and to moderate insulin resistance. It is often called the vegetable insulin. It does not increase insulin secretion but “speeds up carbohydrate use of the cells by affecting membrane lipids.” Seems like the smelly gym shoe hanging on the fence has a great future. But, it is not for everyone: Don’t eat the vegetable if you’re hypoglycemic or pregnant. In diabetics it can lower blood sugar too effectively. It also reduces fertility in men and women.  And, it contains vicine. That can cause favism in people who have a variant glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. (I presume if you don’t know what that is you don’t have it. Favism is a severe reaction to fava beans and or their pollen. Occurs most often in Mediterranean men.)</div> <div>Cultivated versions of the M. charantia, also called Bitter Gourd or Wild Balsam Apple, are found in most Asian markets, and they, too, smell like an old gym shoe. The odor, thankfully, almost all goes away when cooked and the bitterness moderates, but does not go away. If you are not yet brave enough to pick your own, you can buy some or grow it yourself. There are many varieties and numerous recipes are on the Internet. The M. charantia is indeed bitter. Some cut up the vegetable and soak it in water, or salted water and or blanch it  to reduce the bitterness.</div> <div>While I have never seen an Oriental family picking M. charantia off local fences here in Florida, I have seen many Hispanic families doing so.  Dr. Julia Morton, a plant professor in south Florida,  says besides the green fruit, the young leaves when cooked and drained are also edible and nutritious, with iron, phosphorous, calcium and vitamin C. I have never managed to get past the locker room bouquet to toss ‘em in a pot, and the fruit is just too bitter for me to enjoy. The ripe fruit pulp has been used as a soap substitute, which should give you some idea of the flavor. In India and Africa the cooked leaves are canned like spinach. The fragrant flowers can be used as seasoning when cooking.</div> <div> </div> <div>Incidentally, if you have a glut of green Bitter Gourds, you can slice them, partially boil them with salted water, then dry them, sun or otherwise. They will last for several months. You can then fry them and use as you like. Also, drinking the fresh bitter juice is recommended by some naturopaths. That ain’t going to be easy, it’s really bitter…. much easier to tell someone to do it than do it yourself.</div> <div> </div> <div>REMEMBER: No part of the Momordica charantia is ever to be eaten raw, except for the red arils (and remember to spit the seeds out.)  No part, other than the arils, is ever to be eaten when ripe, which is when it is turning from green to yellow to orange. Do not eat the yellow or orange fruit raw or cooked. It is toxic. Also, the green fruit is suspected in the poisoning of dogs and pigs.</div> <div> </div> <div>Relatives: Momordica balsamina, which has longer spines on the fruit and can ripen to red, grows only in St. Lucie County in Florida and only a smattering of places in the southern U.S.  M. balsamina fruit can be pickled or after soaking used as a cooked vegetable. Young shoots and tendrils are boiled as a green. The seeds are eaten.  Momordica cochinchinensis produces a huge round fruit that is red when ripe. Young fruit boiled, not as bitter as M. charantia. Momordica dioica, small and roundish,  is more esteemed than the rest. It is not bitter but sweet. Fruits, shoots, leaves and roots are boiled for food. There are also at least seven commercial cultivars of the Momordica gourds</div> <div>IDENTIFICATION: Momordica charantia: A slender, climbing annual vine to 18 feet with long-stalked leaves and yellow flowers where the leaf meets the stem. Young fruit emerald green turning to orange when ripe. At maturity, fruit splits into three irregular parts that curl backwards showing many reddish-brown or white seeds encased in scarlet arils.</div> <div> </div> <div>TIME OF YEAR: Fruit, summer and fall in warm climates, fall in northern climes.</div> <div> </div> <div>ENVIRONMENT: Love to climb, found in hammocks, disturbed sites, turf and ornamental landscapes, and citrus groves . It seems to be the most common vine on chain link fences in Florida.</div> <div> </div> <div>METHOD OF PREPARATION: None of it ripe except the arils. Boiled green fruit (including seeds) leaves and shoots, boiled twice. Or, cut open and remove seeds and fiber and parboil.  Ripe parts toxic are too bitter to eat.  (An adult can swallow hole two ripe seed and not have much distress.) Young leaves and shoots are boiled and eaten as a potherb. Flowers used as seasoning.</div> <div> </div> <div>HERB BLURB</div> <div>Herbalists say the charantia has long been used to treat diabetes and a host of other ailments from arthritis to jaundice. <p> </p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">preswollen 2 days in water</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0,5-1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20 - 25° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-4 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds Gallery 05.11.2012.</span></p> <div><span style="color: #008000;"> </span></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
V 7 5S
Bitter Melon Seeds (Momordica Charantia)

Variety from Spain
Guindilla De Ibarra green chili pepper seeds 1.75 - 1

Guindilla De Ibarra green...

Price €1.75 - SKU: C 69
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Guindilla De Ibarra green chili pepper seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Variety of hot pepper widely grown in the north of the peninsula, mildly spicy. Plant about 65-70 cm. tall, with small, narrow leaves. Long fruits of about 15-20 cms. Finished in the tip and smooth surface.</p> <p>The chilies of Ibarra, are an ecotype of chili developed in the Basque Country and mostly in the area of ​​Ibarra (Guipúzcoa), is a product of recognized fame among consumers for its taste and tenderness. They are known as Ibarra prawns.</p> <p><strong>Production</strong></p> <p>Because it is a scarce product in terms of its production, the fame that accompanies it has caused that in many chilies of the market the name of “Basque” is used although they do not meet the peculiarities that have given quality recognition to the product.</p> <p>The chili pepper belongs to a native variety of pepper that has developed a series of characteristics that differentiate them from others due to the transformation that the plant has undergone (the pepper is native to America) as it adapts to the climatic characteristics of the area.</p> <p>Over time, the farmers, in collaboration with the administration and agricultural research services of the Basque Country dependent on it, have been improving the traditional characteristics of this chili pepper, developing a “specific ecotype” of the plant that is today production base.</p> <p><strong>Food quality</strong></p> <p>In recent times, with this renewed push and know-how of the packers in the selection and packaging of the product, fame and recognition of it have grown, as well as a Denomination, based on the name of the population where the plant is mostly produced and in which traditional producers and packers have been traditionally located, it is the reference that defines this chili today and the specific form of its preparation.</p> <p>In October 1997, the Kalitatea Foundation awarded the Basque Food Quality Label “Kalitatea” to the chilies packed in vinegar as long as they meet quality parameters defined in the regulations drafted by the Foundation. The Basque Quality Label “Guindilla de Ibarra”, was born with the objective of making the chili pepper produced and packaged in the Basque Country reach the consumer in a reliable and well-identified way that reaches the demanding level of quality defined in a specific Regulation. In this regulation the characteristics that have given him fame and recognition are determined.</p> <p>The denomination "Basque Label of Guindilla de Ibarra Quality" extends in terms of cultivation to that chili pepper produced in hamlets of the Basque Country located in areas that meet the most appropriate geographical and climatic conditions. These are, basically, low altitude (less than 450 meters), mild temperatures, high humidity and rainfall (between 1000 and 1500 m / m per year). Planting takes place between April and May. The collection goes from the end of July until the end of October or mid-November. The collection of the chili pepper varies every two days in the sunny months and it becomes every 15 days in times of bad weather.</p> <p><strong>Collection and packaging</strong></p> <p>The chili is harvested by hand when it is at its optimum point of development. They are then classified by size and placed in the boats and covered with vinegar of wine origin.</p> <p>The packaging is carried out in centers approved by the Regulatory Council of the Label that meet the necessary requirements to ensure a correct manipulation of the chili pepper, the maintenance of the identification from the origin, as well as the ability to develop a correct selection and adequate packaging for preserve to the maximum the peculiarities of the product.</p> <p>Through inspections and controls established from the origin to the commercialization, the Regulatory Council of the Basque Label of Food Quality certifies and guarantees the characteristics of the chili that enters the market with the identification label of the Basque Label of Food Quality. In it, they are incorporated into the Kalitatea seal and the corresponding control numbering. Being a sweet pepper, practically free of itching, it is very suitable for its preparation as an appetizer for meals or as a companion.</p> <p><strong>Typical forms of preparation</strong></p> <p>As an entree, served on a plate with a little salt and a dash of olive oil.</p> <p>Like "Gilda" as an appetizer. Although the methods of preparation of Gildas are multiple, the most typical and popular is that of chili pepper, accompanied by one or two stuffed olives and an anchovy fillet in oil, all inserted in a stick.</p> <p>One of the new modalities of preparation that is having a lot of success and great roots is the fresh chili pepper fried in olive oil, served on a plate with a little salt.</p>
C 69
Guindilla De Ibarra green chili pepper seeds 1.75 - 1

Variety from Peru
Peruvian Yellow Chulpe Corn - Maiz Seeds 2.25 - 2

Peruvian Yellow Chulpe Corn...

Price €2.25 - SKU: P 40 CY
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Peruvian Yellow Chulpe Corn - Maiz Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0202;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Chullpi-Maiz Chullpi has a softer shell and interior, and for this reason is most widely used as a toasted (cancha).</span></p> <p><span>This unusual large kernel corn is grown for popping. The robust kernels explode when heated Having enough force to jump out of the pot. Unlike the popcorn that most of us are used to, Chullpi corn does not “pop” all the way, instead the heart stays meaty and “puffy” with a nice toasted flavor. Being from the Andes, this is surely another long season corn that is most adapted to short daylengths.</span></p> <p><span>Chullpi maize is a native variety of Peru and the provinces of Jujuy and Salta, in North-western Argentina. Its spikes are oval to conical in shape, with numerous rows of 18 to 24 kernels each. The grains are long, narrow, containing starch in the heel and dextrin or sugar at the apex and becoming wrinkled when mature.Chullpi maize is still produced in its native area by farmers of pre-Hispanic origin, who traditionally use it as a food reserve for the winter. Its roasted grains are eaten as they are or together with goat cheese, another product of the region. In addition, it can also be transformed into a typical breakfast drink. Finally, its green ears, called ‘choclos’, can be occasionally consumed boiled in water or roasted, their taste being sweeter than the mature ones as they feature a higher sugar content. The survival of the Chullpi variety is now severely endangered, as on the one hand it requires particular weather conditions for its growth and on the other it suffers from the competition of other commercial sweet corn varieties, which are both sold frozen in the cobs and shelled in cans. This caused its cultivation to plunge, and it is today rare to see it exchanged with other products.</span></p> </body> </html>
P 40 CY
Peruvian Yellow Chulpe Corn - Maiz Seeds 2.25 - 2
Seeds Eucalyptus Gunnii Cider Gum Tree 2.5 - 5

Seeds Eucalyptus Gunnii...

Price €2.50 - SKU: T 7
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Seeds Eucalyptus Gunnii Cider Gum Tree</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>The magnificent Eucalyptus gunnii is one of the most popular hardy varieties of eucalyptus, which thrives in our climate. With silvery-blue, rounded young leaves that give way to long, glaucous, sickle-shaped adult foliage and smooth whitish-green bark that is shed annually in late summer to reveal greyish-green bark, sometimes flushed pink or orange. Although not often seen in the UK, it can bear beautiful creamy-white blooms when it flowers in summer.</div> <div>Eucalyptus are naturally trees, sometimes reaching a great height, but in gardens regular firm annual pruning can keep them as large shrubs and maintain a supply of the juvenile foliage enjoyed by gardeners and flower arrangers. Ideal in a pot on the patio, it can be grown to form a standard tree and clipped regularly for a compact head of silver-blue foliage which produce a scented natural oil that will keep bugs and knats at bay.</div> <div>This magnificent evergreen, fast growing specimen can grow up to 1m (36in) in the first year and once established, are hardy to -18°C  (0°F). Easy to care for, it requires minimum attention.</div> <div>Awarded the prestigious RHS Award of Garden Merit (AGM).</div> <div>Sowing:</div> <div>Germination: Indoors, lightly Cover with uncompacted soil Water well. Keep in a sunny position.</div> <div>Contains seeds(black) and growth medium(brown).Use mixture: DON’T separate out seeds.</div> <div>Sowing into containers:</div> <div>Germination: Indoors, lightly Cover with uncompacted soil Water well. Keep in a sunny position.</div> <div>Contains seeds(black) and growth medium(brown).Use mixture: DON’T separate out seeds.</div> <div>, well drained and sterile compost. (John Innes or 50% multi-purpose and 50% perlite or coarse grit.). Cover with sieved compost or vermiculite. Provide bottom heat if possible. and cover pots with plastic or glass to retain moisture and humidity and protect the seed. Keep moist at all times.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, transplant/prick out each seedling in its own pot of multi-purpose compost. Seedlings in shallow seed trays need transplanting promptly, handling them carefully by holding the seed leaves, rather than the emerging true adult leaves. Seedlings in root trainers can be left a little longer before transplanting, allowing their roots to fill the module, and then transplanting the whole plug of roots and compost in one go.</div> <div>Cultivation:</div> <div>Water regularly, as needed, and feed with liquid fertiliser every month, growing the seedlings on into small plants. The following spring or summer, when the plants are more robust, harden off for 10-14 days before planting out.</div> <div>Plant them out into the garden in late summer to early autumn, giving them the winter to settle their roots into the soil before coming into active growth the following spring. Best grown in sunny sheltered spots. Cold winds are more injurious than frost.</div> <div>Planting guide:</div> <div>Water pot thoroughly and allow to drain. If planting in a lawn, remove a circle of turf 60cm (24in) across. Dig a hole twice the size of the pot and fork over the base, incorporating a handful of general fertiliser and a bucketful of planting compost. Drive in a tree stake a little off-centre. Remove the pot and tease out any matted roots. Position the tree against stake with top of root ball level with surrounding soil. Replace remaining soil, firming-in well. Secure tree to stake with adjustable strap. Water thoroughly, then once a week during the first growing season and during dry spells while the tree is establishing. Garden-grown specimens should not require regular feeding.</div> <div>Container Specimens:</div> <div>Grow in any good multi-purpose potting media or soil-based ones such as John Innes No 2 or No 3. Adding up to 30 percent by volume of coarse grit is often helpful. They benefit from monthly feeding with a balanced liquid fertiliser. Keep the compost moist during the growing season and reduce watering in winter. Repot every two years.</div> <div>Pruning:</div> <div>Requires minimal pruning if grown as a tree, removing any broken, diseased or crossing branches in late autumn or winter. For the best juvenile foliage, prune in early spring cutting back the stems to two or three buds above the base.</div> <div>Plant uses:</div> <div>Containers, Flower Arranging, Architectural, Sub-Tropical, Foliage Specimen.</div> <div>Other Uses:</div> <div>When crushed, the leaves produce a scented natural oil which is often used for cleaning and as a natural insecticide. Natural Dyes from the leaves &amp; bark can give pretty colours, usually ranging from tan &amp; yellow through to rust &amp; red. It is also used for producing paper.</div> <div>Nomenclature:</div> <div>Eucalyptus (From Greek, meaning "well covered") is a diverse genus of trees (and a few shrubs), the members of which dominate the tree flora of Australia.</div> <div> <p>There are more than seven hundred species of Eucalyptus, mostly native to Australia, with a very small number found in adjacent parts of New Guinea and Indonesia and one as far north as the Philippines islands.</p> </div> <div>Many, but far from all, are known as gum trees in reference to the habit of many species to exude copious sap from any break in the bark (e.g. Scribbly Gum).</div> <div>Flowers:           July to October, white to cream, (not often seen in the UK)</div> <div>Foliage:           Fragrant, elliptic, grey-green horizontal branches</div> <div>Height:             15-20m (15-20ft) if unpruned in 15-20 years. Broadly conical.</div> <div>Spread:            8-12m (12-15ft) if unpruned in 15-20 years</div> <div>Soil type:         Prefers neutral to slightly acidic soil that doesn't dry out</div> <div>Position:          Full sun to part shade</div> </body> </html>
T 7
Seeds Eucalyptus Gunnii Cider Gum Tree 2.5 - 5
Penis Chili Seeds 3 - 14

Penis Chili Seeds

Price €3.00 - SKU: C 9
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Penis Chili Seeds (Peter Pepper)</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h3> <div>Definitely not for the prudish. The Peter Pepper is named for its similarity in appearance to an anatomical part. This definitely is a pepper that gets people talking. Plants grow to about 2 feet in height. Medium hot to hot with a good taste. Green fruit ripening to yellow. Can be eaten fresh or dried for seasoning and making chili powder.</div>
C 9
Penis Chili Seeds 3 - 14

Best seller product

Variety from Peru
Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco

Worlds Largest Giant Corn...

Price €2.25 - SKU: P 40
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Native to Peru and Ecuador Peruvian Giant Corn - also known as Choclo is a hideously large variety of corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The stalks reach up to 5 - 5,50 meters in height, a runt in a litter of this cultivar would tower over standard varieties at a whopping 4 metars.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">In standard varieties of corn the average weight runs from 25 - 35 grams per 100 kernels In Peruvian Giant Corn the weight per 100 kernels runs from 90 - 95 grams per 100 kernels - that's nearly 3 times the size and yield.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">It is a late maturing corn and is estimated to need 120 - 150 days to mature. They are not an easy crop to produce, it requires determination and vigilance to grow.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">One would think being indigenous to the Andes mountainous they would be adapted to windy conditions, but this is not the case. They evolved in the Peruvian Urrabamba Valley and vicinity which is sheltered and has relatively mild weather.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn aka Choclo </span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">They do not withstand strong winds and need persistent staking, at 4 - 5,50 metars in height that's a chore and a half.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The plants produce numerous relatively short cobs with gigundous kernels.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The taste is comparable to standard sweet corn. It is not overly sweet - mild to blandly sweet with a creamy texture would be the best description. Peruvians usually boil them. In Ecuador and Bolivia they dry them first then burst or "pop" them in oil - somewhat like popcorn. We gringos can enjoy them the same as any other corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn Should be planted in blocks as opposed to rows and should not be planted near other varieties of Corn [See - Isolating Sweet Corn.] Cross pollination tends to produce poor tasting starchy corn. Sugar Pearl, as per some suppliers does not need to be isolated as other varieties do - this is just fine for the Sugar Pearl, but not necessarily the other variety.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn can be seeded directly into the soil, or it can also be started indoors and later transplanted. If starting indoors be sure you have a larger than standard container as it could easily outgrow the container before transplant time. Whichever you choose, Plant it in blocks, at least four rows wide, for proper pollination and well-filled ears</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Sowing depth Aprox.: 5 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Germination: 6 to 8 days</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Maturity: at 120 - 150 days.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Color: White - Pale Yellow</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Seed Spacing: 30-35 cm apart.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Row spacing: 100 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">USDA Hardiness Zones: 3- 9</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant Size: 400 - 550 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn cob Size: 17-20 cm Long</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Full Sun</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Above Average Yields per Sq. Footage - Anticipate 3 or more ears per Stalk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn has shallow roots, and uses a lot of nitrogen as well as trace elements. To help your crop get off to the best start possible, prepare the soil first with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer. Well rotted manure or compost is also helpful.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant in the northern side of the garden as corn stalks will deny sunlight to the rest of your garden crops ,you also might want to grow some where it will provide shade to plants that can not tolerate full sunlight.</span></p> <div> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/peruvian-giant-red-sacsa-kuski-corn-seeds.html" target="_blank" title="Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE</strong></a></h2> </div> </body> </html>
P 40 5S NS
Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco
Giant Corsican Citron Seeds - 4 kg fruit (Citrus medica Cedrat) 3.7 - 1

Giant Corsican Citron Seeds...

Price €3.70 - SKU: V 230
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Corsican Citron Seeds - 4 kg fruit (Citrus medica Cedrat)</strong></h2><h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2><p><span>The Corsican citron (alimea in Corsican cedrat in french) is a citron variety that contains a non-acidic pulp. The name is from its most original cultivation center which is even today, at the French Island of Corsica or Corse. It is said to be one of the first citrus fruit to reach the Corsican soil.</span></p><p><span>This slow-growing tree reaches a height of about 3 to 4 meters, open and spreading, rather small according to different varieties. Medium-thorny with some large, stout spines. The incredibly fragrant blossom appears in March–April and lasts until September, producing good honey with honey bees. Flowers, buds and new growth are not purple-tinted.</span></p><p><span>The tree produces large fruit, ellipsoid to very slightly obovate; basal area slightly depressed and radially furrowed; apical nipple suppressed or indistinct. Color lemon-yellow when ripe. Rind very thick and fleshy, sweet with some bitter after-taste; surface rather rough, bumpy, and commonly somewhat ribbed. Flesh crisp and solid; lacking in juice; flavor sweet without acid. Seeds white-yellowish. <br /><br /><strong>This giant citron can measure up to 25 cm in length and weigh up to 4 kg.</strong></span></p><h3><strong><span>History, production, and uses</span></strong></h3><p><span>Traditionally, it was one of the most important varieties employed in Succade production. The fruit used to be shipped to Genoa, Italy, where it was de-pulped in the large centers in Livorno, hence its name the Citron of Commerce.</span></p><p><span>With 45,000 tons per year, Corsica was once the world’s leading producer of citron. The historian Laurence Pinelli explains:</span></p><p><span>Citron was a source of considerable wealth for Corsica. It shaped the landscape, added a great deal to our culinary heritage and boosted the island’s economy considerably.</span></p><h3><strong><span>Etrog</span></strong></h3><p><span>For a short period of time Genoese merchants, who always supplied fruit for the Jewish ritual of Etrog, used to ship also some amount of this Corsican variety, while there was not enough available from Diamante. This tradition terminated due to competition with the Greek citron which was considered to be of extraordinary beauty.</span></p><p><span>Today, the citron is cooked with sugar to produce a jam.</span></p>
V 230
Giant Corsican Citron Seeds - 4 kg fruit (Citrus medica Cedrat) 3.7 - 1
SNAKE GOURD Seeds (Trichosanthes cucumerina) 2.35 - 11

SNAKE GOURD Seeds...

Price €2.35 - SKU: P 370 SG
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>SNAKE GOURD Seeds (Trichosanthes cucumerina)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Snake gourds are long and curved vegetables that fall into two different categories. There are the extremely long varieties that are grown for ornamental purposes and have hard skin and there are those grown for eating and medicinal purposes.</p> <p>These Snake gourds have a waxy green skin and are often speckled or striped with a lighter shade of green. The fruit is eaten when young. Longer varieties are best harvested when they are between 16 and 18 inches long. Smaller varieties are best harvested at 6 to 8 inches in length.</p> <p>When the gourd is young, the seeds are fairly nonexistent and the pulp around the seed mass is firm. The taste of a Snake gourd is similar to that of a cucumber. As a Snake gourd gets older, the rind gets hard and turns red. The taste becomes bitter and the insides gelatinous. The seeds are very hard and look similar to jagged-edged watermelon seeds. </p> <p><strong>Seasons/Availability</strong><br />Snake gourds are available during the late summer and fall months. <strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong><br />Some of the longest gourds in the world are known as Snake gourd or ‘Serpent’ gourd. There are several varieties of Snake gourd that are cultivated and grown in India and other areas of the sub-tropics. These cucumber relatives can grow up to five or six feet long and when dried, can be made into a didgeridoo, an Australian Aboriginal wind instrument. Farmers tie stones to the ends of the fruit to weigh it down while it grows, to ensure straighter gourds. <strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Applications</strong><br />Snake gourd can be prepared and used like zucchini; sautéed and served as a side dish or added to dishes with other sautéed vegetables. Snake gourds can also be stuffed or sliced and grilled. In Asian dishes, Snake gourd is made into chutneys and pickled. When the gourd is mature, the seed mass within is scraped out and used like tomato paste in various Indian dishes. <strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Ethnic/Cultural Info</strong></p> <p>In Ayurveda, the ancient medical system of India, the Snake gourd serves multiple purposes. Ingesting the fruit, leaves and flowers of the Snake gourd plant aided in digestive disorders, diabetes, skin diseases and general malaise. </p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong></p> <p>Snake gourds are native to southeastern Asia, Australia and the islands of the Western Pacific. Originally domesticated in India, the serpent-like gourd can be found growing in Africa and other tropical and sub-tropical areas around the world. Botanically known as Trichosanthes cucumerina, Snake gourd seeds traveled from China to Europe via traders in the early 18th century, and were believed to have been planted at Monticello by Thomas Jefferson in 1820. </p> <p> </p> <h2>WIKIPEDIA:</h2> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina is a tropical or subtropical vine, its variety T. cucumerina var. anguina raised for its strikingly long fruit, in Asia eaten immature as a vegetable much like the summer squash, and in Africa, the reddish pulp of its mature fruit is used as an economical substitute of tomato.[2] Common names of the cultivated variety include snake gourd[note 1],[4] serpent gourd,[4] chichinda,[4] and padwal[4] (not to be confused with Trichosanthes dioica, the parwal, another gourd edible when immature).</p> <p> </p> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina is found in the wild across much of South and Southeast Asia, including India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), and southern China (Guangxi and Yunnan).[5] It is also regarded as native in northern Australia.[6][7] and naturalized in Florida,[8] parts of Africa and on various islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.[9]</p> <p> </p> <p>Formerly, the cultivated form was considered a distinct species, T. anguina, but it is now generally regarded as conspecific with the wild populations, as they freely interbreed:</p> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina var. anguina (L.) Haines – cultivated variant</p> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina var. cucumerina – wild variant</p> <p> </p> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina is a monoecious annual vine climbing by means of tendrils. Leaves are palmately lobed, up to 25 cm long. Flowers are unisexual, white, opening at night, with long branching hairs on the margins of the petals. These hairs are curled up in the daytime when the flower is closed, but unfurl at night to form a delicate lacy display (see photos in gallery below). Fruits can be up to 200 cm long, deep red at maturity, hanging below the vine.</p> <p>The related Japanese snake gourd (Trichosanthes pilosa, sometimes called T. ovigera or T. cucumeroides), very similar in vegetative morphology, but the fruit of T. pilosa is round to egg-shaped, only about 7 cm long.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The common name "snake gourd" refers to the narrow, twisted, elongated fruit. The soft-skinned immature fruit can reach up to 150 cm (59 in) in length. Its soft, bland, somewhat mucilaginous flesh is similar to that of the luffa and the calabash. It is popular in the cuisines of South Asia and Southeast Asia and is now grown in some home gardens in Africa. With some cultivars, the immature fruit has an unpleasant odor and a slightly bitter taste, both of which disappear in cooking. The fruit becomes too bitter to eat as it reaches maturity, but it does contain a reddish pulp that is used in Africa as a substitute for tomatoes.</p> <p>The shoots, tendrils, and leaves are also eaten as greens.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p>
P 370 SG
SNAKE GOURD Seeds (Trichosanthes cucumerina) 2.35 - 11
Black Goji Berry - Russian Box Thorn Seeds 1.85 - 3

Black Goji Berry Seeds...

Price €1.85 - SKU: V 36 B
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Black Goji Berry Seeds (Lycium ruthenicum murr)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong><strong><br /></strong></span></h2> <p>Lycium ruthenicum (Chinese: 柴桦; pinyin: chai hua), commonly known as Russian Box Thorn is a species of flowering plant in the nightshade family which can be found in Central Asia, the southern part of Russia, throughout Northwest China, and Pakistan.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The species is either 1.8 centimetres (0.71 in), 20–50 centimetres (7.9–19.7 in), 20–150 centimetres (7.9–59.1 in), or 180 centimetres (71 in) tall. The leaves are either 5–30 millimetres (0.20–1.18 in), 0.6–2.5 centimetres (0.24–0.98 in), or 6–25 millimetres (0.24–0.98 in) by 1–1.5 millimetres (0.039–0.059 in). It has 2-4 sepals each one of which is bell-shaped and 3–4 millimetres (0.12–0.16 in) long. Pedicels are either 5–10 millimetres (0.20–0.39 in) long or can be as long as it sepals. The calyx is 2.5–3.5 millimetres (0.098–0.138 in) long but can be campanulate and exceed 4–5 millimetres (0.16–0.20 in). Corolla's tube is 5–7 millimetres (0.20–0.28 in) long with stamens have 5–8 millimetres (0.20–0.31 in) long berries (which can sometimes grow up to 9 millimetres (0.35 in)) which are also broad and globose. The fruits' seeds are brown coloured and are 1.5–2 millimetres (0.059–0.079 in) long. The flowering time is June to August but can sometimes bloom in May too. Fruits bloom from August to October.</p> <p><strong>Distribution and uses</strong></p> <p>In India, it grows in Kashmir where it is used by native people to cure blindness in camels. In Central Asia and Northwest China, the species grows on the elevation of 400–3,000 metres (1,300–9,800 ft)[1] in saline deserts, sands and roadsides.</p>
V 36 B
Black Goji Berry - Russian Box Thorn Seeds 1.85 - 3
Kohlrabi Seeds 'Early White Vienna' 1.8 - 1

Kohlrabi Seeds Early White...

Price €1.80 - SKU: P 104 W
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Kohlrabi Seeds 'Early White Vienna' (Brassica oleracea gongylodes)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 250 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Flavor is mild, sweet, turnip-like. Round, above-ground 'bulbs' with light green, smooth skin have creamy white, tender flesh. Flavor is mild, sweet, turnip-like. Superb raw or steamed. Ready for harvest 55 days from seed sowing. GARDEN HINTS: Use bulbs when the size of an apple, before they become hard and woody. Store from fall crop in cool, frost-free place for winter use.</p> <p>Days to Maturity: 55  days</p>
P 104 W
Kohlrabi Seeds 'Early White Vienna' 1.8 - 1