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There are 469 products.

Showing 1-15 of 469 item(s)

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.

Variety from Japan
Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1

Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus...

Price €4.15 - SKU: V 118 Y
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 or 4 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The fruit looks somewhat like a small grapefruit with an uneven skin, and can be either yellow or green depending on the degree of ripeness. It is hardy to <strong>-20C.</strong></p> <p>Yuzu limes are small to medium in size, averaging 5-10 centimeters in diameter, and are round, oblate, to slightly lopsided in shape. The peel is thick, pebbly, rough, pocked with many prominent oil glands and pores, and matures from dark green to golden yellow. Underneath the peel, the yellow flesh is minimal, divided into 9-10 segments by white membranes, contains some juice, and is filled with many large, inedible cream-colored seeds. Yuzu limes are highly aromatic, and the rind is rich in essential oils that are released when the fruit’s surface is scratched or cut. The juice and zest also have a unique, acidic blend of sour, tart, and spicy flavors with notes of lime, grapefruit, mandarin. <br><br></p> <h2>Seasons/Availability</h2> <p><br>Yuzu limes are available in the winter through the early spring. <br><br></p> <h2>Current Facts</h2> <p><br>Yuzu limes, botanically classified as Citrus junos, are slow-growing citrus that are found on an evergreen tree or shrub that can reach over five meters in height and belongs to the Rutaceae family. Believed to be a hybrid between the satsuma mandarin and the ichang papeda, Yuzu limes are not botanically a lime but have earned the title since they are often prepared and used similarly. Yuzu limes are mainly cultivated in China, Japan, and Korea and are favored for their tart and spicy juice and zest. They are also valued for their strong fragrance and in Japan, it is one of the most popular scents to be used for cosmetics, candles, cleaning supplies, and bath products. While popular in Asia, Yuzu limes are still relatively unknown in the Western world, but they have been gaining awareness through famous chefs praising and using its unique flavor. <br><br></p> <h2>Nutritional Value</h2> <p><br>Yuzu limes are an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C. They also contain flavonoids, vitamin P which can help absorb other nutrients and increase circulation, and nomilin, which can help aid the body in relaxation. <br><br></p> <h2>Applications</h2> <p><br>Yuzu limes are best suited for both raw and cooked applications and are used for their juice and zest. When juiced, Yuzu limes can be mixed into sauces, vinegar, dressings, and marinades, or they can be shaken into cocktails, flavored water, and tea. Yuzu lime peels can also be used to flavor salted butter for seafood dishes, zested over salad or sashimi, used to flavor ponzu sauce, or ground into powdered form and sprinkled over dishes as a concentrated flavor. In addition to savory dishes, Yuzu lime juice and zest can be baked into tarts or pies, mixed into sorbets, or used in custard. Yuzu limes pair well with coriander, mint, eggs, sashimi, scallops, grilled fish, snow crab, poultry, steak, pork, pepper, black sesame seeds, cumin, lime, raspberry, pomegranate, and cherries. The fruits will keep two weeks when stored in the refrigerator. <br><br></p> <h2>Ethnic/Cultural Info</h2> <p><br>In Japan, the Yuzu lime is one of the most popular fragrances and is most well-known for its use in the winter solstice bath. Each year during the winter solstice, public bathhouses will slice the fruit in half and float them in hot water, creating an aromatic experience. This bathing practice dates back to the 18th century and soaking in Yuzu water is believed to help prevent sicknesses such as flu and colds, and the essential oils and vitamin C are believed to help soften the skin and relieve pain. In addition to bathing, the Yuzu fragrance is also utilized in Yuzu tama or Yuzu egg production. On the island of Shikoku, Japan, farmers feed their hens a mixture of Yuzu peel, sesame seeds, corn, and kale to naturally create an egg that has the flavor and scent of the Yuzu lime. These eggs are sold at a premium price and are traditionally used for tamago kake gohan, which is cooked rice with a raw egg mixed in. <br><br></p> <h2>Geography/History</h2> <p><br>The origins of Yuzu limes are somewhat disputed among scientists, but the majority of scientists conclude that the fruit’s origins are within the upper regions of the Yangtze River in China and have been growing since ancient times. Yuzu limes were then introduced to Japan in 710 CE where they became increasingly popular for their light scent. In 1914, Frank Meyer, the man who discovered the Meyer lemon, visited China and brought seeds from the Yuzu fruit back to the United States. Included in his description of the fruit, he noted that he sourced the seeds from the Hubei Provence along the upper slopes of the Yangtze River at an astonishing elevation of 4,000 feet. The temperatures dip below freezing in that area, and there are no other citrus varieties that grow near the region. Today Yuzu limes are predominately available at local markets in Asia, but there are also a few farms in the United States that commercially cultivate the fruit and sell at farmers markets and specialty grocers</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 118 Y 2-S
Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1
Pepino Dulce, Melon Pear Seeds (Solanum muricatum) 2.55 - 6

Pepino Dulce, Melon Pear...

Price €2.95 - SKU: V 59
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Pepino Dulce, Melon Pear Seeds (Solanum muricatum)</strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <h2><span style="font-size: 15px;" class=""><br>Pepino DulceSolanum muricatum is a species of evergreen shrub native to South America and grown for its sweet edible fruit.</span></h2> <p>It is known as pepino dulce ("sweet pepino") or simply pepino; the latter is also used for similar species such as "S. mucronatum" (which actually seems to belong in the related genus Lycianthes). The pepino dulce fruit resembles a melon (Cucumis melo) in color, and its flavor recalls a succulent mixture of honeydew and cucumber, and thus it is also sometimes called pepino melon or melon pear, but pepinos are only very distantly related to melons and pears. Another common name, "tree melon", is more often used for the Papaya (Carica papaya) and the pepino dulce plant does generally not look much like a tree. The present species is, however, a close relative of other nightshades cultivated for their fruit, including the tomato (S. lycopersicum) and the eggplant (S. melongena), which its own fruit closely resembles.</p> <p>The fruit is common in markets in Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru and Chile, but less often overseas because it is quite sensitive to handling and does not travel well. Attempts to produce commercial cultivars and to export the fruit have been made in New Zealand, Turkey and Chile.</p> <p><strong>Distribution and habitat</strong></p> <p>The pepino dulce is presumed to be native to the temperate Andean regions of Colombia, Peru and Chile, though it is not known in the wild and the details of its domestication are unknown.Thepepino is a domesticated native of the Andes.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Moche clay vessel with pepino decoration (Larco Museum)</p> <p>Pepinos are not often found archaeologically as they are soft and pulpy and not easy to preserve, while their tough seeds are small and easily lost among debris. But they were already described by early Spanish chroniclers as being cultivated on the coast; the Moche Valley in Peru was particularly famous for them. They were a popular decorative motif in Moche art.</p> <p>In the United States the fruit is known to have been grown in San Diego before 1889 and in Santa Barbara by 1897. More commercially viable cultivars were introduced from New Zealand and elsewhere towards the end of the 20th century, leading to its introduction into up-scale markets in Japan, Europe and North America.</p> <p>The pepino dulce is relatively hardy. In its native range it grows at altitudes ranging from close to sea level up to 3,000 m (10,000 ft.). However, it performs best in a warm, relatively frost-free climate. The plant can survive a low temperature of -2.5°C (27 to 28°F) if the freeze is not prolonged, though it may drop many of its leaves.[2] The species is a perennial, but its sensitivity to chilling, pests, and diseases force the growers to replant the crop every year. The crop also adapts well to greenhouse cultivation, training the plants up to 2 m tall, and obtaining yields that are 2-3 times larger than those obtained outdoors.</p> <p>They are propagated by cuttings since they are established easily without rooting hormones. It is grown in a manner similar to its relatives such as the tomato, though it grows naturally upright by habit and can thus be cultivated as a free-standing bush, though it is sometimes pruned on trellises. Additionally, supports are sometimes used to keep the weight of the fruit from pulling the plant down. It has a fast growth rate and bears fruit within 4 to 6 months after planting. It is a perennial, but is usually cultivated as an annual. Seedlings are intolerant of weeds, but it can later easily compete with low growing weeds. Like their relatives tomatoes, eggplants, tomatillos and tamarillos, pepinos are extremely attractive to beetles, aphids, white flies and spider mites. Pepinos are tolerant of most soil types, but require constant moisture for good fruit production. Established bushes show some tolerance to drought stress, but this typically affects yield. The plants are parthenocarpic, meaning it needs no pollination to set fruit, though pollination will encourage fruiting.</p> <p><strong>Ripe pepinos</strong></p> <p>The plant is grown primarily in Chile, New Zealand and Western Australia. In Chile, more than 400 hectares are planted in the Longotoma Valley with an increasing proportion of the harvest being exported. Colombia, Peru, and Ecuador also grow the plant, but on a more local scale. Outside of the Andean region, it been grown in various countries of Central America, Morocco, Spain, Israel, and the highlands of Kenya. In the United States several hundred hectares of the fruit are grown on a small scale in Hawaii and California. More commercially viable cultivars have been introduced from New Zealand and elsewhere in more recent times. As a result, the fruit has been introduced into up-scale markets in Japan, Europe and North America and it is slowly becoming less obscure outside of South America. Delicate and mild-flavored, pepinos are often eaten as a fresh snack fruit, though they combine very well with a number of other fruits as well.</p> <p>The study of the molecular variation of this pepino is of interest for several reasons. Although the seeds of pepino plants are fertile and produce vigorous offspring, this crop is primarily propagated by cuttings (Heiser, 1964; Anderson, 1979; Morley-Bunker, 1983), and as a consequence, its genetic structure could be different from that of seed-propagated crops.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 59 5S
Pepino Dulce, Melon Pear Seeds (Solanum muricatum) 2.55 - 6
Palestinian sweet lime...

Palestinian sweet lime...

Price €2.25 - SKU: V 119 CL
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Palestinian sweet lime seeds (Citrus limettioides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Citrus limettioides, Palestinian sweet lime or Indian sweet lime or common sweet lime, alternatively considered a cultivar of Citrus × limon, C. × limon 'Indian Lime', is a low acid lime that has been used in Palestine for food, juice, and rootstock.</p> <p>Indian sweet lime is a small evergreen tree with few thorns, growing 4 - 6 meters tall.<br />The tree is sometimes cultivated for its edible fruit, especially in India, the Mediterranean region, Vietnam, and tropical America</p> <p>It is a member of the sweet limes. Like the Meyer lemon, it is the result of a cross between the citron (Citrus medica) and a mandarin/pomelo hybrid distinct from sweet and sour oranges.</p> <p><strong>Edible Uses</strong></p> <p>Fruit - raw, cooked, or preserved. A succulent, acidic-sweet pulp. A soft drink is made from the juice.</p> <p><strong>Medicinal</strong></p> <p>The fruit has medicinal properties.<br />Citrus species contain a wide range of active ingredients and research is still underway in finding uses for them. They are rich in vitamin C, flavonoids, acids, and volatile oils. They also contain coumarins such as bergapten which sensitizes the skin to sunlight. Bergapten is sometimes added to tanning preparations since it promotes pigmentation in the skin, though it can cause dermatitis or allergic responses in some people. Some of the plants more recent applications are as sources of anti-oxidants and chemical exfoliants in specialized cosmetics.<br />Other Uses<br />Essential oil is obtained from the peel of the fruit.</p> <p>The plant is used as a rootstock for other Citrus species.</p> </body> </html>
V 119 CL
Palestinian sweet lime seeds (Citrus limettioides)
SWEET WORMWOOD, SWEET ANNIE, SWEET SAGEWORT Seeds (Artemisia annua)

Sweet Wormwood Seeds...

Price €1.95 - SKU: MHS 98
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Sweet Wormwood, Sweet Annie, Sweet Sagewort Seeds (Artemisia annua)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Artemisia annua, commonly called Sweet Annie is a graceful and sweetly fragrant annual with tall stems with fine bright green ferny foliage. With sweetly fragrant foliage it has a wide variety of uses both medicinal and for handcrafting but is most often grown for fresh and dried cut flower arrangements and for wreath making.</p> <p>This is a tall, large ferny green plant that branches out like a shrub. It can grow to around 120 to 150cm (4 to 5ft) tall and 60 to 120cm (2 to 4 ft) wide in one year. It makes a graceful accent in the back of a flowerbed or a pretty quick screen, especially behind other plantings in the garden.</p> <p>The scent is so different that it is difficult to describe accurately many say sweet and fruity, while others say camphor-like. In the garden, place it where you can occasionally brush the plants, as the scent is the biggest reason for growing.</p> <p>Sweet Annie is a sun lover and adaptable to many soil types. It needs only average moisture and will grow even under quite dry conditions. It is a member of the Asteraceae family and usually flowers between August and September. The flowers are tiny and olive green and can't really be seen unless you look hard. However Sweet Annie is mostly grown for the lovely aromatic scent of the foliage which can fill the whole garden when the breeze rustles it branches.</p> <p>Sweet Annie has been used for centuries in its dried form in wreaths and other aroma projects. It is one of the best natural air fresheners around. Just wave a sprig of Sweet Annie in the air and it freshens the whole area. The plant, once dried holds both the colour and fragrance very well and will last for years. The stems have scent but moving them around releases a quick burst of scent, all you have to do is gently wave a piece in the air and the aroma bursts forth.</p> <p>Sweet Annie is one of those things that once you’ve grown it in the garden, you just don’t ever want to be without it.</p> <h3><strong>Sowing: </strong></h3> <p>January to May or July to September.</p> <p>Sow indoors in spring 6 to 8 weeks before last frost. Seeds can also be sown directly where they are to grow after all risk of frost has passed. Sow thinly and thin out seedlings as required. Remember that this is a large plant so broadcasting the seed is not recommended.</p> <p>For indoor sowing, fill trays or pots with a good free draining seed compost. Stand them in water to moisten, then drain. Sow the seeds thinly onto the surface and firm into the soil. Do not exclude light or cover the seed as light aids germination.</p> <p>Place the trays or pots in a propagator or seal container inside a polythene bag until after germination which usually takes 10 to 21 days at temperatures 24°C (75°F). Keep the seedlings moist at all times, remembering to water the soil only and keep water off the leaves.</p> <p>Transplant seedlings when large enough to handle into 7.5cm (3in) pots. Grow on in cooler conditions for 10 to 15 days before planting out after all risk of frost.</p> <h3><strong>Cultivation: </strong></h3> <p>It self-seeds easily when happy, so harvest the whole plant if you don't want seedlings. Otherwise, leave one or two branches at the base of a plant to set seed, this will ensure a good supply of seedlings for next year’s harvest.</p> <h3><strong>Harvesting: </strong></h3> <p>In late summer, watch for the development of ‘beads’, the tiny yellow flowers in loose panicles along the branches. That’s when you’ll have that distinctive aroma. If the branches are cut too soon, they will be of poor quality, so wait until the blossoms open, giving the plants a yellowish cast. Harvested at this time, the plant will dry to a nice medium green and will gradually turn golden brown over time.</p> <p>The main stem will have become thick and woody by harvest time, and you’ll need a heavy pair of lopping shears to cut it. Cut the top 60 to 90cm (2 to 3ft) off the plant and then cut the remaining branches off the main stem.</p> <p>Group the stems into handful-size bunches and wrap a heavy rubber band around the stem ends several times to secure them. Hang the bunches in a warm, dry, dark location with good air circulation, garage or attic rafters are ideal. Leave it hanging for as long as it takes to dry. This might be anywhere from 2 to 4 weeks, depending on the weather conditions, When the centres of the bunches feel completely dry, hang them in a dry place to store them or place them in a cardboard box.</p> <h3><strong>Craft Uses: </strong></h3> <p>Sweet Annie’s most common home use is in crafts. It works well as a base material in wreaths and swags, and it’s an excellent filler in bouquets and arrangements. Long branches can be used whole or broken into smaller pieces, depending on the size of the arrangement. Its fragrance makes it a good addition to potpourri and sachets.</p> <p>Handling dried sweet Annie can generate quite a bit of dust, but this will be minimised if you mist the branches with water before you start to work.</p> <p>The fragrance of sweet Annie is more pronounced during humid weather. Some people like to hang a bunch in a bathroom, where the damp air will release the fragrance.</p> <p>In the Middle Ages, Europeans would strew the dried foliage around their chambers as an air freshener and moth repellent. It was also thought to counteract many poisons as well as plague. Crumbling the dried herb over a carpet before vacuuming is another way to enjoy its sweet scent.</p> <h3><strong>Medicinal Uses: </strong></h3> <p>Artemisia annua has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for decades in the treatment of many diseases. The earliest record dates back to 200 BC, in the ‘Fifty-two Prescriptions’ unearthed from the Mawangdui Han Dynasty tombs. It is called qinghoa and used for the management of fevers and bleeding, for conditions of the digestive tract like flatulence and diarrhoea and for skin conditions such as dermatitis and eczema.</p> <p>Its antimalarial application was first described, in Zhouhou Beiji Fang ‘The Handbook of Prescriptions for Emergencies’, edited in the middle of the fourth century by Ge Hong. In this book, 43 malaria treatment methods were recorded. In modern allopathic medicine, a chemical component of this plant has shown astounding activity in the treatment of malaria. This constituent is a sesquiterpene lactone called artemisinin and it appears to kill and inhibit the growth of malaria-causing protozoa like Plasmodium falciparum.</p> <h3><strong>Other Uses: </strong></h3> <p>Both Sweet Annie and Absinthe Wormwood were sometimes used to flavour beer before the Bavarian Purity law dictated that only hops, barley and water could be used in beer.</p> <p>Sweet Annie is used in tea from leaves and flowers dried or not. But is anything but sweet, it's fairly bitter and medicinal tasting, and most people would dislike it.</p> <h3><strong>Natural Dyes: </strong></h3> <p>Artemisia species provide a wonderful range of greens from baby's breath to nettle green.</p> <h3><strong>Origin: </strong></h3> <p>Artemisia annua is native to southeastern Europe, northern Africa, and Iran. It has found throughout the world, especially in temperate zones at altitudes between 1000 and 1500 meters.</p> <h3><strong>Nomenclature: </strong></h3> <p>The genus name artemisia ultimately derives from the Greek goddess Artemis (Roman Diana), the namesake of Greek Queens Artemisia I and II. A more specific reference may be to Artemisia II of Caria, a botanist and medical researcher who died in 350 BC. The genus includes over 400 plants, including the delectable herb tarragon.</p> <p>Artemisia II of Caria, a botanist and medical researcher who died in 350 BC. She was the sister, the wife, (yes, that is correct) and the successor of Greek/Persian King Mausolus.Because of her grief for her brother-husband, and the extravagant and downright bizarre forms it took, she became to later ages "a lasting example of chaste widowhood and of the purest and rarest kind of love", in the words of Giovanni Boccaccio. In art she was usually shown in the process of consuming his ashes, mixed with drink. To perpetuate his memory she built at Halicarnassus the celebrated Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, listed by Antipater of Sidon as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World and whose name subsequently became the generic term for any splendid sepulchral monument, the word mausoleum.</p> <p>The specific name annua is Latin and means year or annual and refers to the annual biological cycle of this plant.</p> <p>Common names include Sweet Annie, Sweet sagewort, Sweet woodworm, and Chinese woodworm and is called Qing Hao in China.</p> <p>The name Annie is used as a pet form of Anne and Anna and means gracious, full of grace, gentle towards others.</p> <p> <img src="http://www.si-seeds.com/img/cms/Lichtkeimer%20EN1_2.png" alt="" width="492" height="208" /></p> </body> </html>
MHS 98
SWEET WORMWOOD, SWEET ANNIE, SWEET SAGEWORT Seeds (Artemisia annua)

Variety from Thailand
Blue Ginger Or Thai Ginger Seeds (Alpinia galanga) 1.95 - 11

Blue Ginger Or Thai Ginger...

Price €1.95 - SKU: P 372
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>Blue Ginger Or Thai Ginger Seeds (Alpinia galanga)</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 or 6 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Greater Galangal, Alpinia galanga, a plant in the ginger family, is an herb used in cooking, especially in Indonesian and Thai cuisines. It is one of four plants known as galangal, and is differentiated from the others with the common name greater galangal.</p> <p>The plant grows from rhizomes in clumps of stiff stalks up to two meters in height with abundant long leaves which bears red fruit. It is native to South Asia and Indonesia. It is cultivated in Malaysia, Laos, and Thailand. A. galanga is the galangal used most often in cookery. The robust rhizome has a sharp, sweet taste and smells like a blend of black pepper and pine needles. The red fruit is used in traditional Chinese medicine and has a flavor similar to cardamom.</p> <h2><strong>Culinary uses: </strong></h2> <p>The rhizome is a common ingredient in Thai curries and soups, where it is used fresh in chunks or cut into thin slices, mashed and mixed into curry paste. Indonesian rendang is usually spiced with galangal.</p> <h2><strong>Traditional medicine:</strong></h2> <p>Under the names 'Chewing John', 'Little John to Chew', and 'Court Case Root', it is used in African American folk medicine and hoodoo folk magic.</p> <p>Ayurveda considers Alpinia galanga (Sanskrit:-Rasna) as a Vata Shamana drug. Rasnerandadi kashayam,Maharasnadi Kashayam,Rasnadi Choornam are a few among the classical Ayurvedic Medicinal Preparations.</p> </body> </html>
P 372 3S
Blue Ginger Or Thai Ginger Seeds (Alpinia galanga) 1.95 - 11
Ginger Tubers - Rhizomes (Zingiber officinale) 8.55 - 1

Ginger Tubers - Rhizomes...

Price €8.55 - SKU: MHS 76
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Ginger </strong><strong>Tubers - </strong><strong>Rhizomes (Zingiber officinale)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 Tubers.</strong></span></h2> <p>Ginger is a well-known spice produced from the rhizome (underground stem) of the tropical herbaceous plant, Zingiber officinale.</p> <p>Zingiber officinale is best known as the source of the pungent, aromatic spice called ginger. This spice is produced from the rhizome (underground stem) of the plant.</p> <p>Obtained by the Greeks and Romans from Arab traders, it was one of the first oriental spices to arrive in Europe. Other spices in the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) include cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) and turmeric (Curcuma longa).</p> <p>Ginger has many medicinal uses. The fresh or dried rhizome is used in oral or topical preparations to treat a variety of ailments, while the essential oil is applied topically as an analgesic. Evidence suggests ginger is most effective against nausea and vomiting associated with surgery, vertigo, travel sickness and morning sickness. However, the safe use of ginger during pregnancy is questionable and pregnant women should exercise caution before taking it. The topical use of ginger may cause allergic reactions.</p> <p><strong>Synonym: </strong></p> <p>Amomum zingiber L., Zingiber missionis Wall. (for full list see the World Checklist of Selected Plant Families)</p> <p><strong>Genus: </strong></p> <p>Zingiber</p> <p><strong>Geography and distribution</strong></p> <p>Zingiber officinale is possibly native to India. It is widely grown as a commercial crop in south and southeast Asia, tropical Africa (especially Sierra Leone and Nigeria), Latin America, the Caribbean (especially Jamaica) and Australia.</p> <p><strong>Underground parts: </strong></p> <p>Ginger has a distinctive thickened, branched rhizome (underground stem) which sometimes looks somewhat like a swollen hand. The rhizome has a brown corky outer layer (usually removed before use) and a pale yellow centre with a spicy lemon-like scent.</p> <p><strong>Leaves: </strong></p> <p>Shoots (pseudostems), up to 1.2 m tall, arise annually from buds on the rhizome. These pseudostems are formed from a series of leaf bases (sheaths) wrapped tightly around one another with the long (up to 7 cm), narrow (up to 1.9 cm wide), mid-green leaf blades arranged alternately.</p> <p><strong>Flowers: </strong></p> <p>The flowering heads, borne on separate shorter stems, are cone-shaped spikes and composed of a series of greenish to yellowish leaf-like bracts. Protruding just beyond the outer edge of the bracts, the flowers are pale yellow in color with a purplish lip that has yellowish dots and striations. Flowering stems are rarely if ever, produced in cultivated plants.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The aromatic rhizome of Zingiber officinale is the source of ginger, a spice used for centuries to add flavour in cooking. In Asia, the fresh stem is an essential ingredient of many dishes, whereas the dried, powdered spice is more popular in European cooking. Gingerbread, one of the most popular uses for ginger in Britain, dates to Anglo-Saxon times when preserved ginger (produced by boiling the rhizome in sugar syrup) was used, often medicinally.</p> <p>Crystallised ginger, a sweetmeat traditionally eaten as a delicacy at Christmas, is prepared by coating dried, preserved ginger with sugar. Ginger oil, the oleoresin, is used to flavor ginger beer and ginger ale and is commonly used as an ingredient in perfumery, cosmetics, and medicines.</p> <p>The pungent principles in ginger are the non-volatile phenolic compounds gingerol, gingeridioneandshogaol.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Ginger probably originated as part of the ground flora of tropical lowland forests, where many of its wild relatives can still be found. In cultivation it requires hot, humid, shady conditions and grows best in a fertile loam as it needs large quantities of nutrients.</p> <p>Zingiber officinale has been successfully propagated at Kew using internodal cuttings. The cuttings are placed in a shallow pot in a mixture of coir and perlite. The pot is placed in a misting unit (or, if not available, in a closed glass case), which is heated at the base to 20 ˚C. It takes time for any activity to become visible, but eventually, new roots and shoots are produced. It has been noted that this method produces vigorous plants. The traditional technique for propagation of ginger is by division.</p> <p>Mature plants are grown in the behind-the-scenes Tropical Nursery at Kew, in a zone that is kept at a temperature of 18-25 ˚C and at high humidity (70-90 % RH). The plants are watered daily throughout most of the year. In the winter they can be watered less often, as long as they are kept moist. They are fed fortnightly with nitrogen, phosphorus &amp; potassium mix and calcium nitrate.</p> <p>In winter the older pseudostems are removed from the plants, and the new ones allowed to grow up. At this stage, the new pseudostems may need staking, but usually, they are strong enough to support themselves. Occasionally mealy bug and red spider mite cause problems. Where possible these pests are removed by hand.</p> <p><strong>This species at Kew</strong></p> <p>Zingiber officinale can be seen in Kew's Palm House, alongside other plants from Southeast Asia.</p> <p>Various members of the ginger family are grown in the hot moist section of the Princess of Wales Conservatory.</p> <p>Pressed and dried specimens of Zingiber officinale are held in Kew’s Herbarium where they are available to researchers by appointment. The details of one of these specimens can be seen online in Kew’s Herbarium Catalogue.</p> <p>Specimens of ginger are held in Kew’s Economic Botany Collection in the Sir Joseph Banks Building, where they are available to researchers by appointment.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 76
Ginger Tubers - Rhizomes (Zingiber officinale) 8.55 - 1
Bourbon Vanilla Seeds (Vanilla planifolia)

Bourbon Vanilla Seeds...

Price €3.50 - SKU: MHS 104
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Bourbon Vanilla Seeds (Vanilla planifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 or 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Vanilla planifolia is a species of vanilla orchid. It is native to Mexico and Central America, and is one of the primary sources for vanilla flavouring, due to its high vanillin content. Common names are flat-leaved vanilla, Tahitian vanilla,[citation needed] and West Indian vanilla (also used for the Pompona vanilla, V. pompona). Often, it is simply referred to as "the vanilla". It was first scientifically named in 1808.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla planifolia is found in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and northeastern South America. It prefers hot, wet, tropical climates. </span></p> <p><span>It is cultivated and harvested primarily in Veracruz, Mexico and in Madagascar.</span></p> <p><span>Like all members of the genus Vanilla, V. planifolia is a vine. It uses its fleshy roots to support itself as it grows.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Flowers</span></strong></p> <p><span>Flowers are greenish-yellow, with a diameter of 5 cm (2 in). They last only a day, and must be pollinated manually, during the morning, if fruit is desired. The plants are self-fertile, and pollination simply requires a transfer of the pollen from the anther to the stigma. If pollination does not occur, the flower is dropped the next day. In the wild, there is less than 1% chance that the flowers will be pollinated, so in order to receive a steady flow of fruit, the flowers must be hand-pollinated when grown on farms.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Fruit</span></strong></p> <p><span>Fruit is produced only on mature plants, which are generally over 3 m (10 ft) long. The fruits are 15-23 cm (6-9 in) long pods (often incorrectly called beans). Outwardly they resemble small bananas. They mature after about five months, at which point they are harvested and cured. Curing ferments and dries the pods while minimizing the loss of essential oils. Vanilla extract is obtained from this portion of the plant.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla is a flavoring derived from orchids of the genus Vanilla, primarily from the Mexican species, flat-leaved vanilla (V. planifolia). The word vanilla, derived from vainilla, the diminutive of the Spanish word vaina (vaina itself meaning sheath or pod), is translated simply as "little pod". Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican people cultivated the vine of the vanilla orchid, called tlilxochitl by the Aztecs. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés is credited with introducing both vanilla and chocolate to Europe in the 1520s.</span></p> <p><span>Pollination is required to set the vanilla fruit from which the flavoring is derived. In 1837, Belgian botanist Charles François Antoine Morren discovered this fact and pioneered a method of artificially pollinating the plant.[3] The method proved financially unworkable and was not deployed commercially.[4] In 1841, Edmond Albius, a slave who lived on the French island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean, discovered at the age of 12 that the plant could be hand-pollinated. Hand-pollination allowed global cultivation of the plant.</span></p> <p><span>Three major species of vanilla currently are grown globally, all of which derive from a species originally found in Mesoamerica, including parts of modern-day Mexico.[6] They are V. planifolia (syn. V. fragrans), grown on Madagascar, Réunion, and other tropical areas along the Indian Ocean; V. tahitensis, grown in the South Pacific; and V. pompona, found in the West Indies, and Central and South America.[7] The majority of the world's vanilla is the V. planifolia species, more commonly known as Bourbon vanilla (after the former name of Réunion, Île Bourbon) or Madagascar vanilla, which is produced in Madagascar and neighboring islands in the southwestern Indian Ocean, and in Indonesia.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla is the second-most expensive spice after saffron.  Despite the expense, vanilla is highly valued for its flavor.  As a result, vanilla is widely used in both commercial and domestic baking, perfume manufacture, and aromatherapy.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>According to popular belief, the Totonac people, who inhabit the east coast of Mexico in the present-day state of Veracruz, were the first to cultivate vanilla. According to Totonac mythology, the tropical orchid was born when Princess Xanat, forbidden by her father from marrying a mortal, fled to the forest with her lover. The lovers were captured and beheaded. Where their blood touched the ground, the vine of the tropical orchid grew.[4] In the 15th century, Aztecs invading from the central highlands of Mexico conquered the Totonacs, and soon developed a taste for the vanilla pods. They named the fruit tlilxochitl, or "black flower", after the matured fruit, which shrivels and turns black shortly after it is picked. Subjugated by the Aztecs, the Totonacs paid tribute by sending vanilla fruit to the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan.</span></p> <p><span>Until the mid-19th century, Mexico was the chief producer of vanilla. In 1819, French entrepreneurs shipped vanilla fruits to the islands of Réunion and Mauritius in hopes of producing vanilla there. After Edmond Albius discovered how to pollinate the flowers quickly by hand, the pods began to thrive. Soon, the tropical orchids were sent from Réunion to the Comoros Islands, Seychelles, and Madagascar, along with instructions for pollinating them. By 1898, Madagascar, Réunion, and the Comoros Islands produced 200 metric tons of vanilla beans, about 80% of world production. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation, Indonesia is currently responsible for the vast majority of the world's Bourbon vanilla production and 58% of the world total vanilla fruit production.</span></p> <p><span>The market price of vanilla rose dramatically in the late 1970s after a tropical cyclone ravaged key croplands. Prices remained high through the early 1980s despite the introduction of Indonesian vanilla. In the mid-1980s, the cartel that had controlled vanilla prices and distribution since its creation in 1930 disbanded. Prices dropped 70% over the next few years, to nearly US$20 per kilogram; prices rose sharply again after tropical cyclone Hudah struck Madagascar in April 2000. The cyclone, political instability, and poor weather in the third year drove vanilla prices to an astonishing US$500/kg in 2004, bringing new countries into the vanilla industry. A good crop, coupled with decreased demand caused by the production of imitation vanilla, pushed the market price down to the $40/kg range in the middle of 2005. By 2010, prices were down to $20/kg. Cyclone Enawo caused in similar spike to $500/kg in 2017.</span></p> <p><span>Madagascar (especially the fertile Sava region) accounts for much of the global production of vanilla. Mexico, once the leading producer of natural vanilla with an annual yield of 500 tons of cured beans, produced only 10 tons in 2006. An estimated 95% of "vanilla" products are artificially flavored with vanillin derived from lignin instead of vanilla fruits.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Etymology</span></strong></p> <p><span>Vanilla was completely unknown in the Old World before Cortés. Spanish explorers arriving on the Gulf Coast of Mexico in the early 16th century gave vanilla its current name. Spanish and Portuguese sailors and explorers brought vanilla into Africa and Asia later that century. They called it vainilla, or "little pod". The word vanilla entered the English language in 1754, when the botanist Philip Miller wrote about the genus in his Gardener’s Dictionary. Vainilla is from the diminutive of vaina, from the Latin vagina (sheath) to describe the shape of the pods.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Vanilla orchid</span></strong></p> <p><span>The main species harvested for vanilla is V. planifolia. Although it is native to Mexico, it is now widely grown throughout the tropics. Indonesia and Madagascar are the world's largest producers. Additional sources include V. pompona and V. tahitiensis (grown in Niue and Tahiti), although the vanillin content of these species is much less than V. planifolia.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla grows as a vine, climbing up an existing tree (also called a tutor), pole, or other support. It can be grown in a wood (on trees), in a plantation (on trees or poles), or in a "shader", in increasing orders of productivity. Its growth environment is referred to as its terroir, and includes not only the adjacent plants, but also the climate, geography, and local geology. Left alone, it will grow as high as possible on the support, with few flowers. Every year, growers fold the higher parts of the plant downward so the plant stays at heights accessible by a standing human. This also greatly stimulates flowering.</span></p> <p><span>The distinctively flavored compounds are found in the fruit, which results from the pollination of the flower. These seed pods are roughly a third of an inch by six inches, and brownish red to black when ripe. Inside of these pods is an oily liquid full of tiny seeds.[22] One flower produces one fruit. V. planifolia flowers are hermaphroditic: they carry both male (anther) and female (stigma) organs. However, self-pollination is blocked by a membrane which separates those organs. The flowers can be naturally pollinated by bees of genus Melipona (abeja de monte or mountain bee), by bee genus Eulaema, or by hummingbirds. The Melipona bee provided Mexico with a 300-year-long advantage on vanilla production from the time it was first discovered by Europeans. The first vanilla orchid to flower in Europe was in the London collection of the Honourable Charles Greville in 1806. Cuttings from that plant went to Netherlands and Paris, from which the French first transplanted the vines to their overseas colonies. The vines grew, but would not fruit outside Mexico. Growers tried to bring this bee into other growing locales, to no avail. The only way to produce fruits without the bees is artificial pollination. Today, even in Mexico, hand pollination is used extensively.</span></p> <p><span>In 1836, botanist Charles François Antoine Morren was drinking coffee on a patio in Papantla (in Veracruz, Mexico) and noticed black bees flying around the vanilla flowers next to his table. He watched their actions closely as they would land and work their way under a flap inside the flower, transferring pollen in the process. Within hours, the flowers closed and several days later, Morren noticed vanilla pods beginning to form. Morren immediately began experimenting with hand pollination. A few years later in 1841, a simple and efficient artificial hand-pollination method was developed by a 12-year-old slave named Edmond Albius on Réunion, a method still used today. Using a beveled sliver of bamboo, an agricultural worker lifts the membrane separating the anther and the stigma, then, using the thumb, transfers the pollinia from the anther to the stigma. The flower, self-pollinated, will then produce a fruit. The vanilla flower lasts about one day, sometimes less, so growers have to inspect their plantations every day for open flowers, a labor-intensive task.</span></p> <p><span>The fruit, a seed capsule, if left on the plant, ripens and opens at the end; as it dries, the phenolic compounds crystallize, giving the fruits a diamond-dusted appearance, which the French call givre (hoarfrost). It then releases the distinctive vanilla smell. The fruit contains tiny, black seeds. In dishes prepared with whole natural vanilla, these seeds are recognizable as black specks. Both the pod and the seeds are used in cooking.</span></p> <p><span>Like other orchids' seeds, vanilla seeds will not germinate without the presence of certain mycorrhizal fungi. Instead, growers reproduce the plant by cutting: they remove sections of the vine with six or more leaf nodes, a root opposite each leaf. The two lower leaves are removed, and this area is buried in loose soil at the base of a support. The remaining upper roots cling to the support, and often grow down into the soil. Growth is rapid under good conditions.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Cultivars</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Bourbon vanilla</span></strong><span> or Bourbon-Madagascar vanilla, produced from V. planifolia plants introduced from the Americas, is from Indian Ocean islands such as Madagascar, the Comoros, and Réunion, formerly the Île Bourbon. It is also used to describe the distinctive vanilla flavor derived from V. planifolia grown successfully in tropical countries such as India.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Mexican vanilla</span></strong><span>, made from the native V. planifolia,[26] is produced in much less quantity and marketed as the vanilla from the land of its origin. Vanilla sold in tourist markets around Mexico is sometimes not actual vanilla extract, but is mixed with an extract of the tonka bean, which contains the toxin coumarin. Tonka bean extract smells and tastes like vanilla, but coumarin has been shown to cause liver damage in lab animals and has been banned in food in the US by the Food and Drug Administration since 1954.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Tahitian vanilla</span></strong><span> is from French Polynesia, made with V. tahitiensis. Genetic analysis shows this species is possibly a cultivar from a hybrid of V. planifolia and V. odorata. The species was introduced by French Admiral François Alphonse Hamelin to French Polynesia from the Philippines, where it was introduced from Guatemala by the Manila Galleon trade.</span></p> <p><strong><span>West Indian vanilla</span></strong><span> is made from V. pompona grown in the Caribbean and Central and South America.</span></p> <p><span>The term French vanilla is often used to designate particular preparations with a strong vanilla aroma, containing vanilla grains and sometimes also containing eggs (especially egg yolks). The appellation originates from the French style of making vanilla ice cream with a custard base, using vanilla pods, cream, and egg yolks. Inclusion of vanilla varietals from any of the former French dependencies or overseas France may be a part of the flavoring. Alternatively, French vanilla is taken to refer to a vanilla-custard flavor.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Chemistry</span></strong></p> <p><span>Vanilla essence occurs in two forms. Real seedpod extract is a complex mixture of several hundred different compounds, including vanillin, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, furfural, hexanoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, eugenol, methyl cinnamate, and isobutyric acid.[citation needed] Synthetic essence consists of a solution of synthetic vanillin in ethanol. The chemical compound vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) is a major contributor to the characteristic flavor and aroma of real vanilla and is the main flavor component of cured vanilla beans.[30] Vanillin was first isolated from vanilla pods by Gobley in 1858. By 1874, it had been obtained from glycosides of pine tree sap, temporarily causing a depression in the natural vanilla industry. Vanillin can be easily synthesized from various raw materials, but the majority of food-grade (&gt; 99% pure) vanillin is made from guaiacol.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Pollination</span></strong></p> <p><span>Flowering normally occurs every spring, and without pollination, the blossom wilts and falls, and no vanilla bean can grow. Each flower must be hand-pollinated within 12 hours of opening. In the wild, very few natural pollinators exist, with most pollination thought to be carried out by the shiny green Euglossa viridissima, some Eulaema spp. and other species of the euglossine or orchid bees, Euglossini, though direct evidence is lacking. Closely related Vanilla species are known to be pollinated by the euglossine bees.[40] The previously suggested pollination by stingless bees of the genus Melipona is thought to be improbable, as they are too small to be effective and have never been observed carrying Vanilla pollen or pollinating other orchids, though they do visit the flowers.[41] These pollinators do not exist outside the orchid's home range, and even within that range, vanilla orchids have only a 1% chance of successful pollination. As a result, all vanilla grown today is pollinated by hand. A small splinter of wood or a grass stem is used to lift the rostellum or move the flap upward, so the overhanging anther can be pressed against the stigma and self-pollinate the vine. Generally, one flower per raceme opens per day, so the raceme may be in flower for over 20 days. A healthy vine should produce about 50 to 100 beans per year, but growers are careful to pollinate only five or six flowers from the 20 on each raceme. The first flowers that open per vine should be pollinated, so the beans are similar in age. These agronomic practices facilitate harvest and increases bean quality. The fruits require five to six weeks to develop, but around six months to mature. Over-pollination results in diseases and inferior bean quality.[35] A vine remains productive between 12 and 14 years.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Harvest</span></strong></p> <p><span>Harvesting vanilla fruits is as labor-intensive as pollinating the blossoms. Immature, dark green pods are not harvested. Pale yellow discoloration that commences at the distal end of the fruits is not a good indication of the maturity of pods. Each fruit ripens at its own time, requiring a daily harvest. "Current methods for determining the maturity of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) beans are unreliable. Yellowing at the blossom end, the current index, occurs before beans accumulate maximum glucovanillin concentrations. Beans left on the vine until they turn brown have higher glucovanillin concentrations but may split and have low quality. Judging bean maturity is difficult as they reach full size soon after pollination. Glucovanillin accumulates from 20 weeks, maximum about 40 weeks after pollination. Mature green beans have 20% dry matter but less than 2% glucovanillin."[46] The accumulation of dry matter and glucovanillin are highly correlated.To ensure the finest flavor from every fruit, each individual pod must be picked by hand just as it begins to split on the end. Overmatured fruits are likely to split, causing a reduction in market value. Its commercial value is fixed based on the length and appearance of the pod.</span></p> <p><span>If the fruit is more than 15 cm (5.9 in) in length, it is categorized as first-quality. The largest fruits greater than 16 cm and up to as much as 21 cm are usually reserved for the gourmet vanilla market, for sale to top chefs and restaurants. If the fruits are between 10 and 15 cm long, pods are under the second-quality category, and fruits less than 10 cm in length are under the third-quality category. Each fruit contains thousands of tiny black vanilla seeds. Vanilla fruit yield depends on the care and management given to the hanging and fruiting vines. Any practice directed to stimulate aerial root production has a direct effect on vine productivity. A five-year-old vine can produce between 1.5 and 3 kg (3.3 and 6.6 lb) pods, and this production can increase up to 6 kg (13 lb) after a few years. The harvested green fruit can be commercialized as such or cured to get a better market price.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Culinary uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>The four main commercial preparations of natural vanilla are:</span></p> <p><span>Whole pod</span></p> <p><span>Powder (ground pods, kept pure or blended with sugar, starch, or other ingredients)</span></p> <p><span>Extract (in alcoholic or occasionally glycerol solution; both pure and imitation forms of vanilla contain at least 35% alcohol)</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla sugar, a packaged mix of sugar and vanilla extract</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla flavoring in food may be achieved by adding vanilla extract or by cooking vanilla pods in the liquid preparation. A stronger aroma may be attained if the pods are split in two, exposing more of a pod's surface area to the liquid. In this case, the pods' seeds are mixed into the preparation. Natural vanilla gives a brown or yellow color to preparations, depending on the concentration. Good-quality vanilla has a strong, aromatic flavor, but food with small amounts of low-quality vanilla or artificial vanilla-like flavorings are far more common, since true vanilla is much more expensive.</span></p> <p><span>Regarded as the world's most popular aroma and flavor, vanilla is a widely used aroma and flavor compound for foods, beverages and cosmetics, as indicated by its popularity as an ice cream flavor.[64] Although vanilla is a prized flavoring agent on its own, it is also used to enhance the flavor of other substances, to which its own flavor is often complementary, such as chocolate, custard, caramel, coffee, and others. Vanilla is a common ingredient in Western sweet baked goods, such as cookies and cakes.</span></p> <p><span>The food industry uses methyl and ethyl vanillin as less-expensive substitutes for real vanilla. Ethyl vanillin is more expensive, but has a stronger note. Cook's Illustrated ran several taste tests pitting vanilla against vanillin in baked goods and other applications, and to the consternation of the magazine editors, tasters could not differentiate the flavor of vanillin from vanilla; however, for the case of vanilla ice cream, natural vanilla won out.[66] A more recent and thorough test by the same group produced a more interesting variety of results; namely, high-quality artificial vanilla flavoring is best for cookies, while high-quality real vanilla is slightly better for cakes and significantly better for unheated or lightly heated foods. The liquid extracted from vanilla pods was once believed to have medical properties, helping with various stomach ailments.</span></p> </body> </html>
MHS 104
Bourbon Vanilla Seeds (Vanilla planifolia)

Variety from Turkey

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Pistachio Seeds (Pistacia vera) (Antep Pistachio)

Pistachio Seeds (Pistacia...

Price €1.65 - SKU: V 187 T
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Pistachio Seeds (Pistacia vera) (Antep Pistachio)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5, 20, 50, 100, 500 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Gaziantep, informally called Antep, is a city in southeast Turkey and is among the oldest continually inhabited cities in the world. The Turkish word for pistachio is Antep Fistigi. The Gaziantep area with its fertile soil and arrid climate is the primary growing region for the Antep Pistachio.&nbsp; Many connoisseurs consider this nut to be one of the finest and best tasting nut in the world.</p> <p><strong>NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:</strong></p> <p>Compared to other pistachio varieties including California grown</p> <p>GENUINE GAZIANTEP PISTACHIOS CONTAIN:</p> <p>50% less fat</p> <p>40% less carbohydrates</p> <p>200% more vitamin C</p> <p>70% more iron</p> <p>20% more calcium</p> <p>&nbsp;23% more magnesium</p> <h2>Wikipedia:</h2> <p>The pistachio (/pɪˈstɑːʃiˌoʊ, -ˈstæ-/,[1] Pistacia vera), a member of the cashew family, is a small tree originating from Central Asia and the Middle East.[2] The tree produces seeds that are widely consumed as food.</p> <p>Pistacia vera often is confused with other species in the genus Pistacia that are also known as pistachio. These other species can be distinguished by their geographic distributions (in the wild) and their seeds which are much smaller and have a soft shell.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Archaeology shows that pistachio seeds were a common food as early as 6750 BC.[3] Pliny the Elder writes in his Natural History that pistacia, "well known among us", was one of the trees unique to Syria, and that the seed was introduced into Italy by the Roman Proconsul in Syria, Lucius Vitellius the Elder (in office in 35 AD) and into Hispania at the same time by Flaccus Pompeius.[4] The early sixth-century manuscript De observatione ciborum ("On the observance of foods") by Anthimus implies that pistacia remained well known in Europe in Late Antiquity. Archaeologists have found evidence from excavations at Jarmo in northeastern Iraq for the consumption of Atlantic pistachio.[3] The Hanging Gardens of Babylon were said to have contained pistachio trees during the reign of King Merodach-Baladan about 700 BC.</p> <p>The modern pistachio P. vera was first cultivated in Bronze Age Central Asia, where the earliest example is from Djarkutan, modern Uzbekistan.[5][6] It appears in Dioscurides as pistakia πιστάκια, recognizable as P. vera by its comparison to pine nuts.</p> <p>Additionally, remains of the Atlantic pistachio and pistachio seed along with nut-cracking tools were discovered by archaeologists at the Gesher Benot Ya'aqov site in Israel's Hula Valley, dated to 780,000 years ago.[8] More recently, the pistachio has been cultivated commercially in many parts of the English-speaking world, in Australia, and in New Mexico[9] and California, of the United States, where it was introduced in 1854 as a garden tree.[10] David Fairchild of the United States Department of Agriculture introduced hardier cultivars collected in China to California in 1904 and 1905, but it was not promoted as a commercial crop until 1929.[9][11] Walter T. Swingle’s pistachios from Syria had already fruited well at Niles by 1917.</p> <p>The earliest records of pistachio in English are around roughly year 1400, with the spellings "pistace" and "pistacia". The word pistachio comes from medieval Italian pistacchio, which is from classical Latin pistacium, which is from ancient Greek pistákion and pistákē, which is generally believed to be from Middle Persian, although unattested in Middle Persian. Later in Persian, the word is attested as pesteh. As mentioned, the tree came to the ancient Greeks from Western Asia.</p> <p><strong>Habitat</strong></p> <p>Pistachio is a desert plant, and is highly tolerant of saline soil. It has been reported to grow well when irrigated with water having 3,000–4,000 ppm of soluble salts.[9] Pistachio trees are fairly hardy in the right conditions, and can survive temperatures ranging between −10 °C (14 °F) in winter and 48 °C (118 °F) in summer. They need a sunny position and well-drained soil. Pistachio trees do poorly in conditions of high humidity, and are susceptible to root rot in winter if they get too much water and the soil is not sufficiently free-draining. Long, hot summers are required for proper ripening of the fruit. They have been known to thrive in warm, moist environments.</p> <p>The Jylgyndy Forest Reserve, a preserve protecting the native habitat of Pistacia vera groves, is located in the Nooken District of Jalal-Abad Province of Kyrgyzstan.</p> <p><strong>Characteristics</strong></p> <p>The bush grows up to 10 m (33 ft) tall. It has deciduous pinnate leaves 10–20 centimeters (4–8 inches) long. The plants are dioecious, with separate male and female trees. The flowers are apetalous and unisexual, and borne in panicles.</p> <p>The fruit is a drupe, containing an elongated seed, which is the edible portion. The seed, commonly thought of as a nut, is a culinary nut, not a botanical nut. The fruit has a hard, creamish exterior shell. The seed has a mauvish skin and light green flesh, with a distinctive flavor. When the fruit ripens, the shell changes from green to an autumnal yellow/red, and abruptly splits part way open (see photo). This is known as dehiscence, and happens with an audible pop. The splitting open is a trait that has been selected by humans.[14] Commercial cultivars vary in how consistently they split open.</p> <p>Each pistachio tree averages around 50 kilograms (110 lb) of seeds, or around 50,000, every two years.</p> <p>The shell of the pistachio is naturally a beige color, but it is sometimes dyed red or green in commercial pistachios. Originally, dye was applied by importers to hide stains on the shells caused when the seeds were picked by hand. Most pistachios are now picked by machine and the shells remain unstained, making dyeing unnecessary except to meet ingrained consumer expectations. Roasted pistachio seeds can be artificially turned red if they are marinated prior to roasting in a salt and strawberry marinade, or salt and citrus salts.</p> <p>Like other members of the Anacardiaceae family (which includes poison ivy, sumac, mango, and cashew), pistachios contain urushiol, an irritant that can cause allergic reactions.</p> <p><strong>Production and cultivation</strong></p> <p>Iran, the United States and Turkey are the major producers of pistachios, together accounting for 83% of the world production in 2013 (table).</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>The trees are planted in orchards, and take approximately seven to ten years to reach significant production. Production is alternate-bearing or biennial-bearing, meaning the harvest is heavier in alternate years. Peak production is reached around 20 years. Trees are usually pruned to size to make the harvest easier. One male tree produces enough pollen for eight to 12 drupe-bearing females. Harvesting in the United States and in Greece is often accomplished using equipment to shake the drupes off the tree. After hulling and drying, pistachios are sorted according to open-mouth and closed-mouth shells. Sun-drying has been found to be the best method of drying,[18] then they are roasted or processed by special machines to produce pistachio kernels.</p> <p>Pistachio trees are vulnerable to a wide variety of diseases. Among these is infection by the fungus Botryosphaeria, which causes panicle and shoot blight (symptoms include death of the flowers and young shoots), and can damage entire pistachio orchards.</p> <p>In Greece, the cultivated type of pistachios has an almost-white shell, sweet taste, a red-green kernel and a closed-mouth shell relative to the 'Kerman' variety. Most of the production in Greece comes from the island of Aegina, the region of Thessaly-Almyros and the regional units of West Attica, Corinthia and Phthiotis.</p> <p>In California, almost all female pistachio trees are the cultivar 'Kerman'. A scion from a mature female 'Kerman' is grafted onto a one-year-old rootstock.</p> <p>Bulk container shipments of pistachio kernels are prone to self-heating and spontaneous combustion because of their high fat and low water contents.</p> <p><strong>Consumption</strong></p> <p>The kernels are often eaten whole, either fresh or roasted and salted, and are also used in pistachio ice cream, kulfi, spumoni, historically in Neapolitan ice cream, pistachio butter,[21][22] pistachio paste[23] and confections such as baklava, pistachio chocolate,[24] pistachio halva,[25] pistachio lokum or biscotti and cold cuts such as mortadella. Americans make pistachio salad, which includes fresh pistachios or pistachio pudding, whipped cream, and canned fruit.</p> <p>China is the top pistachio consumer worldwide, with annual consumption of 80,000 tons, while the United States consumes 45,000 tons.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional information</strong></p> <p>Pistachios are a nutritionally dense food. In a 100 gram serving, pistachios provide 562 calories and are a rich source (20% or more of the Daily Value or DV) of protein, dietary fiber, several dietary minerals and the B vitamins, thiamin and especially vitamin B6 at 131% DV (table).[28] Pistachios are a good source (10–19% DV) of calcium, riboflavin, vitamin B5, folate, vitamin E , and vitamin K (table).</p> <p>The fat profile of raw pistachios consists of saturated fats, monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats.[28][29] Saturated fatty acids include palmitic acid (10% of total) and stearic acid (2%).[29] Oleic acid is the most common monounsaturated fatty acid (51% of total fat)[29] and linoleic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, is 31% of total fat.[28] Relative to other tree nuts, pistachios have a lower amount of fat and calories but higher amounts of potassium, vitamin K, γ-tocopherol, and certain phytochemicals such as carotenoids and phytosterols.</p> <p><strong>Research and health effects</strong></p> <p>In July 2003, the United States' Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first qualified health claim specific to seeds lowering the risk of heart disease: "Scientific evidence suggests but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces (42.5 g) per day of most nuts, such as pistachios, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease".[31] Although pistachios contain many calories, epidemiologic studies have provided strong evidence that their consumption is not associated with weight gain or obesity.</p> <p>A 2015 systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials concluded that pistachio consumption in persons without diabetes mellitus appears to modestly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure.[32] Several mechanisms for pistachios' antihypertensive properties have been proposed. These mechanisms include pistachios' high levels of the amino acid arginine (a precursor of the blood vessel dilating compound nitric oxide); high levels of phytosterols and monounsaturated fatty acids; and improvement of endothelial cell function through multiple mechanisms including reductions in circulating levels of oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol and pro-inflammatory chemical signals.</p> <p><strong>Toxin and safety concerns</strong></p> <p>As with other tree seeds, aflatoxin is found in poorly harvested or processed pistachios. Aflatoxins are potent carcinogenic chemicals produced by molds such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The mold contamination may occur from soil, poor storage, and spread by pests. High levels of mold growth typically appear as gray to black filament-like growth. It is unsafe to eat mold-infected and aflatoxin-contaminated pistachios.[33] Aflatoxin contamination is a frequent risk, particularly in warmer and humid environments. Food contaminated with aflatoxins has been found as the cause of frequent outbreaks of acute illnesses in parts of the world. In some cases, such as Kenya, this has led to several deaths.</p> <p>Pistachio shells typically split naturally prior to harvest, with a hull covering the intact seeds. The hull protects the kernel from invasion by molds and insects, but this hull protection can be damaged in the orchard by poor orchard management practices, by birds, or after harvest, which makes it much easier for pistachios to be exposed to contamination. Some pistachios undergo so-called "early split", wherein both the hull and the shell split. Damage or early splits can lead to aflatoxin contamination.[35] In some cases, a harvest may be treated to keep contamination below strict food safety thresholds; in other cases, an entire batch of pistachios must be destroyed because of aflatoxin contamination. In September 1997, the European Union placed its first ban on pistachio imports from Iran due to high levels of aflatoxin. The ban was lifted in December 1997 after Iran introduced and improved food safety inspections and product quality.</p> <p>Pistachio shells may be helpful in cleaning up pollution created by mercury emissions.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 187 T 5 S
Pistachio Seeds (Pistacia vera) (Antep Pistachio)
Climbing Green Bean 'Fasold' Seeds

Climbing Green Bean...

Price €1.95 - SKU: VE 154 (3,5g)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Climbing Green Bean 'Fasold' Seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Early cropping Climbing Bean 'Fasold' bears decorative mauve flowers followed by huge harvests of superb flavored French Beans. The long, fleshy, stringless pods are produced over a long period and are slow to develop seeds. With a less vigorous, semi-climbing habit, this variety is ideal for growing under glass for the earliest crops.</p> <p><strong>Height: 180cm (70”).</strong></p> <p><strong>Spread 30cm (12”).</strong></p>
VE 154 (3,5g)
Climbing Green Bean 'Fasold' Seeds
Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)

Climbing Strawberry seeds...

Price €2.50 - SKU: V 1 CS
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest"</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of<strong> 10 </strong>seeds.</strong></span><em><br /></em></strong></h3> <p>A unique climbing strawberry! This fast, strong growing variety will produce runners up to 1,5m in length that make a real talking point when trained up a trellis or obelisk climbing frame, or cascading from window boxes and hanging baskets. Better still, Strawberry 'Mount Everest' is an ever-bearering variety that produces a delicious crop of medium sized, sweet, juicy fruits from June right through to September! Height: 1,5m. Spread: 30cm.</p> <p>Estimated time to cropping once planted: 4-8 months.<br />Estimated time to best yields: 4-8 months.</p> </div>
V 1 CS
Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)

Variety from Thailand
Sweet Thai Musk Melon Seeds Seeds Gallery - 8

Sweet Thai Musk Melon Seeds

Price €1.95 - SKU: V 37
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sweet Thai Musk Melon Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This Thai melon (Tang Thai) is very popular in Thailand, has an oval shape with yellow skin, 2-3 kgs in weight. The fruit is delicious and has an excellent smell. The young fruit is used canned or pickled, while mature fruit has a delicious smell, and it is used for making refreshing desserts.<br />Good resistant to deceases and easy to grow. <br />Maturity is in 70-80 days after sowing.</p>
V 37
Sweet Thai Musk Melon Seeds Seeds Gallery - 8

Variety from Italy
Cucumber - Melon Seeds - Carosello Barattiere

Cucumber Melon Seeds -...

Price €1.95 - SKU: P 334
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Cucumber - Melon Seeds - Carosello Barattiere</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Apulian (Italy) Heirloom cultivar sweet oval cucumber-melon with smooth crisp light green skin. The white interior reveals a savory tender flesh that is bitter-free and does not cause indigestion as other cucumbers can. The Fruits are 500 grams of weight, round, dark green, smooth, without hair on the skin, contain less simple sugars and less sodium than the Cucumber species.</p> <p>Growth habit is spread out. A drought-resistant variety that does well in most places, including hot climates.</p> <p>Maturity: 60 days</p> <p>Open-pollinated Heirloom</p> <h3><strong>Sowing instructions:</strong></h3> <p>Plant seeds 1 inch deep indoors from March-April or directly outdoors from June-July. Transplant seedlings outdoors in June spacing plants 20-24 inches apart and rows 36 inches apart. Harvest from August-September.</p> <p>Maturity: 60 days</p> <p>Open-pollinated Heirloom</p>
P 334
Cucumber - Melon Seeds - Carosello Barattiere

Variety from Russia
Mirzachul, Gulabi, Torpedo Melon Seeds Seeds Gallery - 6

Mirzachul, Gulabi, Torpedo...

Price €2.75 - SKU: VE 167 (1g)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>MIRZACHUL, GULABI, TORPEDO Melon Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 25 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>There are unique products that can be bought only in Russia. And most importantly, delicious melon-torpedo. It is called the torpedo for its elongated shape. Melon torpedo has been known for several centuries. In Uzbekistan, it is called Mirzachul melon. It is grown in the area Mirzachul Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan in the surrounding area.</p> <p>In Central Asia, are grown in the world’s most delicious melon. In Uzbekistan there are more than 150 varieties of melon.</p> <p>Uzbek melon torpedo lends itself well to transport. It is available in large quantities in Russia. Here you can buy from July to October.</p> <p>If the melon cut, it can be seen in the delicate white flesh is sweet and juicy large melon seeds Mirzachul: Fairy melon flavor just turns his head and leads you into ecstasy.</p> <p>According to some reports, melon seeds, and work to improve the potency of the prostate gland.</p> <p>The size of a melon-torpedo can reach nearly two feet in length:</p> <p>The weight of the Uzbek melon torpedo can reach 8-9 kg or more:</p> <p>Uzbek melon-torpedo only grows in Uzbekistan and southern Kazakhstan. It is very demanding to light and heat. To grow in colder areas in Russia launched the melon-grade torpedo “Rainbow”, but it is inferior in flavor, taste and size.</p> <p>The farmers who came from the Soviet Union, Uzbek melon-grown torpedo in the United States in the states of California and Arizona. It should be noted that this melon cultivation involves a significant risk of losing the crop. This variety may be affected with powdery mildew. In addition, when excessive irrigation during fruiting, the fruit may burst. So I do not recommend trying to grow a melon Mirzachul right on a huge field, not to get a big loss.</p> <p>Melons should not be planted close to cucumbers, as a result of cross-pollination in melon can get a taste of cucumber.</p> <p>The seeds of the Uzbek melon-torpedo should be kept 2-3 years before you plant them. Otherwise, on the plants are mostly male flowers.</p> <h2><span style="color: #07542a;"><a href="https://www.si-seeds.com/en/home/how-to-grow-melons.html" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color: #07542a;">How to grow melons</span></a></span></h2><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 167 (1g)
Mirzachul, Gulabi, Torpedo Melon Seeds Seeds Gallery - 6

Best seller product

This plant has giant fruits
Giant Red Raspberry Seeds

Giant Red Raspberry Seeds

Price €1.95 - SKU: V 99
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Giant Red Raspberry Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,070 g) or 200 (0,251 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Rubus idaeus (Raspberry, also called Red Raspberry or occasionally as European Raspberry to distinguish it from other raspberries) is a red-fruited species of Rubus native to Europe and northern Asia and commonly cultivated in other temperate regions. A closely related plant in North&nbsp;</div> <p>America, sometimes regarded as the variety Rubus idaeus var. strigosus, is more commonly treated as a distinct species, Rubus strigosus (American Red Raspberry), as is done here.[3] Red-fruited cultivated raspberries, even in North America, are generally Rubus idaeus or horticultural derivatives of hybrids of R. idaeus and R. strigosus; these plants are all addressed in the present article.</p> <p>Plants of Rubus idaeus are generally perennials which bear biennial stems ("canes") from a perennial root system. In its first year, a new, unbranched stem ("primocane") grows vigorously to its full height of 1.5-2.5 m, bearing large pinnately compound leaves with five or seven leaflets, but usually no flowers. In its second year (as a "floricane"), a stem does not grow taller, but produces several side shoots, which bear smaller leaves with three or five leaflets. The flowers are produced in late spring on short racemes on the tips of these side shoots, each flower about 1 cm diameter with five white petals. The fruit is red, edible, and sweet but tart-flavoured, produced in summer or early autumn; in botanical terminology, it is not a berry at all, but an aggregate fruit of numerous drupelets around a central core. In raspberries (various species of Rubus subgenus Idaeobatus), the drupelets separate from the core when picked, leaving a hollow fruit, whereas in blackberries and most other species of Rubus, the drupelets stay attached to the core.[4][5][6][7]</p> <p>As a wild plant, R. idaeus typically grows in forests, forming open stands under a tree canopy, and denser stands in clearings. In the south of its range (southern Europe and central Asia), it only occurs at high altitudes in mountains.[6] The species name idaeus refers to its occurrence on Mount Ida near Troy in northwest Turkey, where the ancient Greeks were most familiar with it.</p> <p><strong>Fruits</strong></p> <p>The fruit of R. idaeus is an important food crop, though most modern commercial raspberry cultivars derive from hybrids between R. idaeus and R. strigosus.</p> <p><strong>Leaves and other parts</strong></p> <p>Main article: Red raspberry leaf</p> <p>Red raspberries contains 31 μg/100 g of folate.[8] Red raspberries have antioxidant effects that play a minor role in the killing of stomach and colon cancer cells. Nutr Res. 30(11):777-782 &lt;/ref&gt;[9]</p> <p>Young roots of Rubus idaeus prevented kidney stone formation in a mouse model of hyperoxaluria.[10] Tiliroside from raspberry is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor and might be used as a skin-whitening agent and pigmentation medicine.</p> <p>Raspberry fruit may protect the liver.</p> <p><strong>Chemistry</strong></p> <p>Vitamin C and phenolics are present in red raspberries. Most notably, the anthocyanins cyanidin-3-sophoroside, cyanidin-3-(2(G)-glucosylrutinoside) and cyanidin-3-glucoside, the two ellagitannins sanguiin H-6 and lambertianin C are present together with trace levels of flavonols, ellagic acid and hydroxycinnamate.</p> <div> <p>Polyphenolic compounds from raspberry seeds are efficient antioxidants.</p> <h2 class="header Heading3"><span style="color: #008000;">Seed Germination</span></h2> <ul> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">1</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Fill a seed starter tray with sterile potting soil in the early fall. Press one to two raspberry seeds ¼ inch down into the soil of each cell. Pat the soil down gently over the seeds to remove air pockets.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">2</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Mist the soil lightly to dampen, using a spray bottle filled with water. Keep the soil moist throughout the germination process. Place the seed starter tray in a cool, dark area while the raspberry seeds germinate. The seeds will begin to sprout within three months.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> <ul> <li class="step"> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Set the seed starter tray in an area that receives bright, indirect sunlight once the seeds begin to sprout. If this is not possible, set up a grow light and place the seed starter tray underneath.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">4</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Continue to keep the soil moist and provide the raspberry plants with adequate light as they continue to grow. Transplant the raspberry plants outdoors in the spring, as soon as the soil is workable.</span></p> <h2 class="header Heading3"><span style="color: #008000;">Outdoor Transplanting</span></h2> <ul> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">5</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Select an area for transplanting your raspberries that contains full sun and well-drained soil with a pH between 5.5 and 6.5. Test the soil if you are unsure of your soil pH, using a soil testing kit purchased from a garden center.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">6</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Turn over the soil with a pitchfork after the final winter frost and add lime to the soil if the pH is below 5.5. Add peat moss if the soil pH is above 6.5. Add the required amendment according to label instructions.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">7</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Dig holes for the raspberry plants that are comparable in size to their root balls. Space each hole 2 feet apart. Space rows 8 to 12 feet apart. Remove the raspberry plants from the seed starter tray, placing one raspberry plant in the center of each hole. Backfill the holes.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">8</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water the raspberry plants generously after planting. Use a soaker hose that will deliver deep watering. Water at a rate of 1 inch per week, keeping the soil moist at all times during the growing season.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">9</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Cut the raspberry plants down to the soil line, using a sharp pair of scissors or pruning shears, in the late fall. Cutting the plants back will encourage growth the following spring.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">10</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Fertilize the raspberry plants the following spring when they begin to grow again. Apply a 10-10-10 fertilizer per label instructions. Continue to keep the soil moist. Harvest the raspberries when they ripen in the summer.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 99 (0,07g)
Giant Red Raspberry Seeds
Black Melon Seeds 2.45 - 4

Black Melon Seeds

Price €2.45 - SKU: V 47
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Black Melon Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price is for pack of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The fruit has good size (2 - 3 kg.).  The flesh is light green, and is very sweet and tastes a little bit like the taste of pineapple. Due to black color, it's very good for the region where is not much sun and where the beautiful sunny days are rare because as we all know black attracts the sun's rays more than any other color, so that the melons ripen in record time and a lot less than all other varieties </p> <p><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hje7-Pl9ryQ&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank" style="background-color:#ffffff;" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hje7-Pl9ryQ&amp;feature=youtu.be</strong></a></p>
V 47
Black Melon Seeds 2.45 - 4