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Best sellers

There are 722 products.

Showing 1-15 of 722 item(s)
Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)

Climbing Strawberry seeds...

Price €2.50 - SKU: V 1 CS
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest"</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of<strong> 10 </strong>seeds.</strong></span><em><br /></em></strong></h3> <p>A unique climbing strawberry! This fast, strong growing variety will produce runners up to 1,5m in length that make a real talking point when trained up a trellis or obelisk climbing frame, or cascading from window boxes and hanging baskets. Better still, Strawberry 'Mount Everest' is an ever-bearering variety that produces a delicious crop of medium sized, sweet, juicy fruits from June right through to September! Height: 1,5m. Spread: 30cm.</p> <p>Estimated time to cropping once planted: 4-8 months.<br />Estimated time to best yields: 4-8 months.</p> </div>
V 1 CS
Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)
Alba Strawberry Seeds

Alba Strawberry Seeds

Price €2.85 - SKU: V 1 A
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Alba Strawberry Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 100 (0.06g) seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Alba strawberries are very large, long, and uniform. The shape is attractive, fruit flesh very firm, and bright red. The strawberries have a good smell and excellent taste. Alba plants are very strong, they are immune to almost all common diseases. The plants have a good, concentrated ripening period. The strawberries are easy to pick. The plants are susceptible to the herbicide. The fruits can be harvested already in May.</p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/how-to-grow-strawberries-from-seed.html">How to Grow Strawberries from Seeds</a></strong></p> </body> </html>
V 1 A
Alba Strawberry Seeds
Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media) 1.55 - 1

Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria...

Price €1.95 - SKU: MHS 81
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 100 (0,046 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Stellaria media, chickweed, is a cool-season annual plant native to Europe, but naturalized in many parts of North America. It is used as a cooling herbal remedy, and grown as a vegetable crop and ground cover for both human consumption and poultry. It is sometimes called common chickweed to distinguish it from other plants called chickweed. Other common names include chickenwort, craches, maruns, winterweed. The plant germinates in autumn or late winter, then forms large mats of foliage. Flowers are small and white, followed quickly by the seed pods. This plant flowers and sets seed at the same time.</p> <p>Stellaria media is widespread in North America, Europe and Asia. There are several closely related plants referred to as chickweed, but which lack the culinary properties of plants in the genus Stellaria. Plants in the genus Cerastium are very similar in appearance to Stellaria and are in the same family (Carophyllaceae). Stellaria media can be easily distinguished from all other members of this family by examining the stems. Stellaria has fine hairs on only one side of the stem in a single band and on the sepals.[1] Other members of the family Carophyllaceae which resemble Stellaria have hairs uniformly covering the entire stem. It usually has 3 stamens[1] other references indicate 5 stamens[2] and 3 - 8 in other references.</p> <p>The larvae of the European moth yellow shell (Camptogramma bilineata), of North American moths pale-banded dart (Agnorisma badinodis) or dusky cutworm (Agrotis venerabilis) or North American butterfly dainty sulphur (Nathalis iole) all feed on chickweed.</p> <p>In both Europe and North America this plant is common in gardens,[4] fields, and disturbed grounds. Control is difficult due to the heavy seed sets. Common Chickweed is very competitive with small grains, and can produce up to 80% yield losses among barley.</p> <h2><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></h2> <h2><strong>As food</strong></h2> <p>Stellaria media is edible and nutritious, and is used as a leaf vegetable, often raw in salads. It is one of the ingredients of the symbolic dish consumed in the Japanese spring-time festival, Nanakusa-no-sekku.</p> <h3><strong>Toxicity</strong></h3> <p>S. media contains plant chemicals known as saponins, which can be toxic when consumed in large quantities. Chickweed has been known to cause saponin poisoning in cattle. However, as the animal must consume several kilos of chickweed in order to reach a toxic level, such deaths are rare.</p> <p><strong>In folk medicine</strong></p> <p>The plant has medicinal purposes and is used in folk medicine. It has been used as a remedy to treat itchy skin conditions and pulmonary diseases.[7] 17th century herbalist John Gerard recommended it as a remedy for mange. Modern herbalists prescribe it for iron-deficiency anemia (for its high iron content), as well as for skin diseases, bronchitis, rheumatic pains, arthritis and period pain.[8] Not all of these uses are supported by scientific evidence.</p>
MHS 81 (0,046 g)
Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media) 1.55 - 1
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose...

Price €1.95 - SKU: T 25
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Argyreia nervosa is a perennial climbing vine that is native to the Indian subcontinent and introduced to numerous areas worldwide, including Hawaii, Africa, and the Caribbean. Though it can be invasive, it is often prized for its aesthetic value. Common names include Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, Adhoguda अधोगुडा or Vidhara विधारा (Sanskrit), Elephant Creeper and Woolly Morning Glory. There are two botanical varieties: Argyreia nervosavar. nervosa described here, and Argyrea nervosa var. speciosa, a species used in ayurvedic medicine, but with little to no psychoactive value.</p> <p>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose seeds may be consumed for their various ergoline alkaloids, such as Lysergic acid amide, which can produce psychedelic effects.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The plant is a rare example of a plant whose hallucinogenic properties were not recognized until recent times. While its cousins in the Convolvulaceae family, such as the Rivea corymbosa (Ololiuhqui) and Ipomoea tricolor (Tlitliltzin), were used in shamanic rituals of Latin America for centuries, the Hawaiian Baby Woodrose was not traditionally recognized as a hallucinogen. Its properties were first brought to attention in the 1960s, despite the fact that the chemical composition of its seeds is nearly identical to those of the two species mentioned above, and the seeds contain the highest concentration of psychoactive compounds in the entire family.</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>In most countries, it is legal to purchase, sell or germinate Argyreia nervosa seeds, but they are generally unapproved for human consumption. Depending on the country, it may be illegal to buy seeds with the intention to consume them, and several countries have outlawed ergine-containing seeds altogether. In Australia, retailers are required to treat their seeds with chemicals to discourage consumption, and it is illegal to buy or possess untreated seeds.</p> <p><strong>Extracted chemicals</strong></p> <p>Extracting ergine from Argyreia speciosa seeds is illegal in the USA since it is a scheduled substance. It is classified as a schedule III depressant by the DEA, although the substance has hallucinogenic/psychedelic properties.</p> <p>Extracts</p> <p>In an animal model of ulcers in rats, large doses of the extract of Argyreia speciosa leaves (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight) showed dose-dependent antiulcer activity and cured the Ulcers.</p> </body> </html>
T 25
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Black Strawberry Seeds -...

Price €2.25 - SKU: V 1
,
5/ 5
<h2>Black Strawberry Seeds - Exotic Rare</h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span></h2> <p><strong style="color:#ff0000;font-size:18px;"></strong>A lovely Black Strawberry that is fully hardy. Perfect for small spaces or containers, it will produce an abundance of small sweet fruit, with a hint of pineapple.</p> <p>Heavy cropping and easy to grow.</p> <p>Perennial herb densely clustered with straighter branches.15-25cm in height. Cymose anthotaxy with juicy flesh. Require loosing and weeding at intervals on the loose fertile soil with ample organic fertilizers. Favor to warm and need moisture to live through the winter.</p> <div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3 align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p> </p> </div> </div>
V 1
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Best seller product
Caper Spurge or Paper Spurge Seeds 2.45 - 3

Caper Spurge Seeds...

Price €2.45 - SKU: MHS 30
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Caper Spurge or Paper Spurge Seeds (Euphorbia lathyris)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong> Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Euphorbia Lathyris is also commonly known as Mole Plant, Paper Spurge, Gopher Plant, Caper Spurge, or Gopher Spurge. It is an ornamental plant that grows up to 1 meter (5 ft) in height. The plant is mostly characterized as part of the Euphorbia family because of the milky white sap it emits when cut. The leaves are narrow and taper either the apex of the base thus earning them the term Lanceolate and they have milky white midveins. The flowers themselves tend to be inconspicuous and are yellow-green to green in color. An attractive plant that is native to southern Europe, South Africa, and Asia is a biennial that is classified as extremely toxic to humans and animals if ingested and it is also a skin irritant when handled improperly because of the latex it produces. It's known uses include its ability to repel moles and any other subterranean pests. The French are said to have eaten the seeds as a purgative even though they are as toxic as the plant.</p> <p>Growing information: Some seeds rely on the temperature change from winter to spring in order to break dormancy and the seeds of this plant fall into that category. In order to germinate them, the seeds need to be either planted outside during early spring at least 2-3 weeks prior to the expected heat surge or they need to be kept in a refrigerator for as long before planting.</p> <p><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></p> <p>Euphorbia lathyris (Caper Spurge or Paper Spurge) is a species of spurge native to southern Europe (France, Italy, Greece, and possibly southern England), northwest Africa, and eastward through southwest Asia to western China.</p> <p>Other names occasionally used include Gopher Spurge, Gopher Plant or Mole Plant.</p> <p><strong>Growth</strong></p> <p>It is an erect biennial (occasionally annual) plant growing up to 1.5 m tall, with a glaucous blue-green stem. The leaves are arranged in decussate opposite pairs, and are lanceolate, 5–15 cm long and 1-2.5 cm broad, glaucous blue-green with a waxy texture and pale greenish-white midrib and veins. The flowers are green to yellow-green, 4 mm diameter, with no petals. The seeds are green ripening brown or grey, produced in globular clusters 13–17 mm diameter of three seeds compressed together.</p> <p><strong>Chemical characteristics</strong></p> <p>All parts of the plant, including the seeds and roots are poisonous. Handling may cause skin irritation as the plant produces latex. While poisonous to humans and most livestock, goats sometimes eat it and are immune to the toxin. However, the toxin can be passed through the goat's milk.</p> <p><strong>Habitat</strong></p> <p>Away from its native range, it is widely naturalised in many regions, where it is often considered an invasive weed. It grows in partial shade to full sun in USDA zones 5–9.</p> <p><strong>Medicinal uses</strong></p> <p>The Mole Plant is sold by some nurseries as it is believed to repel moles. It is used in folk medicine as a poison, antiseptic, and a purgative. It is used as a folk remedy for cancer, corns, and warts.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 30
Caper Spurge or Paper Spurge Seeds 2.45 - 3
Fasolia Gigantes White Beans Seeds 1.65 - 4

Fasolia Gigantes White...

Price €1.85 - SKU: P 161
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Fasolia Gigantes White Beans Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Greek giant beans, are a traditional Greek food, used in several Greek gourmet recipes, such as bean soup, baked beans in the oven (butter beans), Greek salad, etc. Undoubtedly they are a healthy, natural food and favorably place themselves in a Mediterranean diet.</p> <p>Traditionally, gigandes plaki are served as a meze alongside other side dishes. However, this dish is filling enough to be eaten for lunch. This hearty meze is popular during the cold fall and winter months. As with many Greek dishes, bread is used to dip in to the tomato sauce drippings.</p> <div>Overall, gigandes plaki is a healthy and nutritious food. It is a rich source for anti-oxidants from the tomatoes, and fiber from the other vegetables, and is suitable for vegetarians and vegans if the sausages and cheese are excluded.</div> <div>These beans are 100% natural, this is not a hybrid or mutant product.</div> </div>
P 161
Fasolia Gigantes White Beans Seeds 1.65 - 4

Best seller product
Giant Red Raspberry Seeds  - 2

Giant Red Raspberry Seeds

Price €1.95 - SKU: V 99
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Giant Red Raspberry Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,070 g) or 200 (0,251 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Rubus idaeus (Raspberry, also called Red Raspberry or occasionally as European Raspberry to distinguish it from other raspberries) is a red-fruited species of Rubus native to Europe and northern Asia and commonly cultivated in other temperate regions. A closely related plant in North </div> <p>America, sometimes regarded as the variety Rubus idaeus var. strigosus, is more commonly treated as a distinct species, Rubus strigosus (American Red Raspberry), as is done here.[3] Red-fruited cultivated raspberries, even in North America, are generally Rubus idaeus or horticultural derivatives of hybrids of R. idaeus and R. strigosus; these plants are all addressed in the present article.</p> <p>Plants of Rubus idaeus are generally perennials which bear biennial stems ("canes") from a perennial root system. In its first year, a new, unbranched stem ("primocane") grows vigorously to its full height of 1.5-2.5 m, bearing large pinnately compound leaves with five or seven leaflets, but usually no flowers. In its second year (as a "floricane"), a stem does not grow taller, but produces several side shoots, which bear smaller leaves with three or five leaflets. The flowers are produced in late spring on short racemes on the tips of these side shoots, each flower about 1 cm diameter with five white petals. The fruit is red, edible, and sweet but tart-flavoured, produced in summer or early autumn; in botanical terminology, it is not a berry at all, but an aggregate fruit of numerous drupelets around a central core. In raspberries (various species of Rubus subgenus Idaeobatus), the drupelets separate from the core when picked, leaving a hollow fruit, whereas in blackberries and most other species of Rubus, the drupelets stay attached to the core.[4][5][6][7]</p> <p>As a wild plant, R. idaeus typically grows in forests, forming open stands under a tree canopy, and denser stands in clearings. In the south of its range (southern Europe and central Asia), it only occurs at high altitudes in mountains.[6] The species name idaeus refers to its occurrence on Mount Ida near Troy in northwest Turkey, where the ancient Greeks were most familiar with it.</p> <p><strong>Fruits</strong></p> <p>The fruit of R. idaeus is an important food crop, though most modern commercial raspberry cultivars derive from hybrids between R. idaeus and R. strigosus.</p> <p><strong>Leaves and other parts</strong></p> <p>Main article: Red raspberry leaf</p> <p>Red raspberries contains 31 μg/100 g of folate.[8] Red raspberries have antioxidant effects that play a minor role in the killing of stomach and colon cancer cells. Nutr Res. 30(11):777-782 &lt;/ref&gt;[9]</p> <p>Young roots of Rubus idaeus prevented kidney stone formation in a mouse model of hyperoxaluria.[10] Tiliroside from raspberry is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor and might be used as a skin-whitening agent and pigmentation medicine.</p> <p>Raspberry fruit may protect the liver.</p> <p><strong>Chemistry</strong></p> <p>Vitamin C and phenolics are present in red raspberries. Most notably, the anthocyanins cyanidin-3-sophoroside, cyanidin-3-(2(G)-glucosylrutinoside) and cyanidin-3-glucoside, the two ellagitannins sanguiin H-6 and lambertianin C are present together with trace levels of flavonols, ellagic acid and hydroxycinnamate.</p> <div> <p>Polyphenolic compounds from raspberry seeds are efficient antioxidants.</p> <h2 class="header Heading3"><span style="color: #008000;">Seed Germination</span></h2> <ul> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">1</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Fill a seed starter tray with sterile potting soil in the early fall. Press one to two raspberry seeds ¼ inch down into the soil of each cell. Pat the soil down gently over the seeds to remove air pockets.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">2</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Mist the soil lightly to dampen, using a spray bottle filled with water. Keep the soil moist throughout the germination process. Place the seed starter tray in a cool, dark area while the raspberry seeds germinate. The seeds will begin to sprout within three months.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> <ul> <li class="step"> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Set the seed starter tray in an area that receives bright, indirect sunlight once the seeds begin to sprout. If this is not possible, set up a grow light and place the seed starter tray underneath.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">4</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Continue to keep the soil moist and provide the raspberry plants with adequate light as they continue to grow. Transplant the raspberry plants outdoors in the spring, as soon as the soil is workable.</span></p> <h2 class="header Heading3"><span style="color: #008000;">Outdoor Transplanting</span></h2> <ul> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">5</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Select an area for transplanting your raspberries that contains full sun and well-drained soil with a pH between 5.5 and 6.5. Test the soil if you are unsure of your soil pH, using a soil testing kit purchased from a garden center.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">6</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Turn over the soil with a pitchfork after the final winter frost and add lime to the soil if the pH is below 5.5. Add peat moss if the soil pH is above 6.5. Add the required amendment according to label instructions.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">7</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Dig holes for the raspberry plants that are comparable in size to their root balls. Space each hole 2 feet apart. Space rows 8 to 12 feet apart. Remove the raspberry plants from the seed starter tray, placing one raspberry plant in the center of each hole. Backfill the holes.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">8</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water the raspberry plants generously after planting. Use a soaker hose that will deliver deep watering. Water at a rate of 1 inch per week, keeping the soil moist at all times during the growing season.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">9</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Cut the raspberry plants down to the soil line, using a sharp pair of scissors or pruning shears, in the late fall. Cutting the plants back will encourage growth the following spring.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> <li class="step"><span style="color: #008000;">10</span> <div class="stepMeat"> <div> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Fertilize the raspberry plants the following spring when they begin to grow again. Apply a 10-10-10 fertilizer per label instructions. Continue to keep the soil moist. Harvest the raspberries when they ripen in the summer.</span></p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </body> </html>
V 99 (0,07g)
Giant Red Raspberry Seeds  - 2

Best seller product

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria sinensis) 1.85 - 1

Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria...

Price €1.85 - SKU: T 46
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria sinensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Wisteria (also spelled Wistaria or Wysteria) is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae, that includes ten species of woody climbing vines native to the Eastern United States and to China, Korea, and Japan. Some species are popular ornamental plants, especially in China and Japan. An aquatic flowering plant with the common name wisteria or 'water wisteria' is in fact Hygrophila difformis, in the family Acanthaceae.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><strong>Description</strong></span></p> <p>Wisteria vines climb by twining their stems either clockwise or counterclockwise round any available support. They can climb as high as 20 m above the ground and spread out 10 m laterally. The world's largest known Wisteria vine is in Sierra Madre, California, measuring more than 1 acre (0.40 ha) in size and weighing 250 tons. Planted in 1894, it is of the Chinese lavender variety.</p> <p>The leaves are alternate, 15 to 35 cm long, pinnate, with 9 to 19 leaflets. The flowers are produced in pendulous racemes 10 to 80 cm long, similar to those of the genus Laburnum, but are purple, violet, pink or white. There is no yellow on the leaves. Flowering is in the spring (just before or as the leaves open) in some Asian species, and in mid to late summer in the American species and W. japonica. The flowers of some species are fragrant, most notably Chinese Wisteria. The seeds are produced in pods similar to those of Laburnum, and, like the seeds of that genus, are poisonous.</p> <p>Wisteria is an extremely hardy plant that is considered an invasive species in many parts of the U.S., especially the Southeast, due to its ability to overtake and choke out other native plant species.</p> <p>Wisteria species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including brown-tail.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Wisteria, especially Wisteria sinensis, is very hardy and fast-growing. It can grow in fairly poor-quality soils, but prefers fertile, moist, well-drained soil. They thrive in full sun. Wisteria can be propagated via hardwood cutting, softwood cuttings, or seed. However, specimens grown from seed can take decades to bloom; for this reason, gardeners usually grow plants that have been started from rooted cuttings or grafted cultivars known to flower well.[citation needed] Another reason for failure to bloom can be excessive fertilizer (particularly nitrogen). Wisteria has nitrogen fixing capability (provided by Rhizobia bacteria in root nodules), and thus mature plants may benefit from added potassium and phosphate, but not nitrogen. Finally, wisteria can be reluctant to bloom because it has not reached maturity. Maturation may require only a few years, as in Kentucky Wisteria, or nearly twenty, as in Chinese Wisteria. Maturation can be forced by physically abusing the main trunk, root pruning, or drought stress.</p> <p>Wisteria can grow into a mound when unsupported, but is at its best when allowed to clamber up a tree, pergola, wall, or other supporting structure. Whatever the case, the support must be very sturdy, because mature Wisteria can become immensely strong with heavy wrist-thick trunks and stems. These will certainly rend latticework, crush thin wooden posts, and can even strangle large trees. Wisteria allowed to grow on houses can cause damage to gutters, downspouts, and similar structures. Its pendulous racemes are best viewed from below.</p> <p>Wisteria flowers develop in buds near the base of the previous year's growth, so pruning back side shoots to the basal few buds in early spring can enhance the visibility of the flowers. If it is desired to control the size of the plant, the side shoots can be shortened to between 20 and 40 cm long in mid summer, and back to 10 to 20 cm in the fall. Once the plant is a few years old, a relatively compact, free-flowering form can be achieved by pruning off the new tendrils three times during the growing season; in June, July and August, for the northern hemisphere. The flowers of some varieties are edible, and can even be used to make wine. Others are said to be toxic. Careful identification by an expert is strongly recommended before consuming this or any wild plant.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>The botanist Thomas Nuttall said he named the genus Wisteria in memory of Dr. Caspar Wistar (1761–1818).[1][2] Questioned about the spelling later, Nuttall said it was for "euphony," but his biographer speculated that it may have something to do with Nuttall's friend Charles Jones Wister, Sr., of Grumblethorpe, the grandson of the merchant John Wister.[3] (Some Philadelphia sources state that the plant is named after Wister.)[4] As the spelling is apparently deliberate, there is no justification for changing the genus name under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.[5] However, some spell the plant's common name "wistaria", and Fowler is decisively for the "wistaria" spelling.</p> <p>Genetic analysis shows Callerya, Afgekia and Wisteria to be each other's closest relatives and quite distinct from other members of the tribe Millettieae. Both have eight chromosomes.</p> <p><strong>In culture</strong></p> <p>Fuji Musumè (藤娘?) or Wisteria Maiden is an Otsu-e (Japanese folk painting in Ōtsu, Shiga) subject thought to have been inspired by popular dances. These paintings were often sold as good-luck charms for marriages. Fuji Musumè is also a famous classical Kabuki dance.</p> <p>In Barbara Kingsolver's novel The Bean Trees, Turtle refers to wisteria vines as bean trees, because the pre-bloomed flower pods are shaped like beans. Later, she and Taylor learn that wisteria is a legume (i.e., is in the bean family) and that wisteria and other legumes engage in symbiotic relationships, just as the book's characters do.</p> <p>In Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Giant Wistaria," the plant becomes both a sign of virility ("'It groweth well, this vine thou broughtest me in the ship, my husband.'") as well as a sign of destruction. A daughter has a child out of wedlock and her parents plan to take her back to the old country while giving the baby to a local town. The daughter hears this and ultimately, drowns the baby. She either hangs herself from the wistaria vines roots growing in the basement or they strangle her and kill her; the story doesn't clarify.</p> </body> </html>
T 46 (5 S)
Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria sinensis) 1.85 - 1
Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus...

Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus...

Price €3.85 - SKU: V 100 RC
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f70606;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Rubus chamaemorus</b></i><span> </span>is a<span> </span>species<span> </span>of<span> </span>flowering plant<span> </span>in the rose<span> </span>family<span> </span>Rosaceae, native to cool<span> </span>temperate<span> </span>regions,<span> </span>alpine<span> </span>and<span> </span>arctic tundra<span> </span>and<span> </span>boreal forest.<span> </span>This<span> </span>herbaceous<span> </span>perennial<span> </span>produces amber-colored edible fruit similar to the<span> </span>blackberry. English common names include<span> </span><b>cloudberry</b>,<span> </span><b>nordic berry</b>,<span> </span><b>bakeapple</b><span> </span>(in<span> </span>Newfoundland and Labrador),<span> </span><b>knotberry</b><span> </span>and<span> </span><b>knoutberry</b><span> </span>(in England),<span> </span><b>aqpik</b><span> </span>or<span> </span><b>low-bush salmonberry</b><span> </span>(in<span> </span>Alaska<span> </span>– not to be confused with salmonberry,<span> </span><i>Rubus spectabilis</i>),<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>and<span> </span><b>averin</b><span> </span>or<span> </span><b>evron</b><span> </span>(in<span> </span>Scotland).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1c/Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg/230px-Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg" decoding="async" width="230" height="307" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1c/Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg/345px-Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1c/Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg/460px-Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg 2x" data-file-width="1600" data-file-height="2133" title="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Male flower</div> </div> </div> <p>Unlike most<span> </span><i>Rubus</i><span> </span>species, the cloudberry is<span> </span>dioecious, and fruit production by a female plant requires pollination from a male plant.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-1" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>The cloudberry grows to 10–25 cm (4–10 in) high.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-2" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>The<span> </span>leaves<span> </span>alternate between having 5 and 7 soft, handlike lobes on straight, branchless stalks. After pollination, the white (sometimes reddish-tipped)<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>form raspberry-sized<span> </span>aggregate fruits<span> </span>which are more plentiful in wooded rather than sun-exposed habitats.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-3" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Consisting of between 5 and 25<span> </span>drupelets, each fruit is initially pale red, ripening into an amber color in early autumn.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Distribution_and_ecology">Distribution and ecology</span></h2> <p>In North America, cloudberries grow wild across Greenland, most of northern Canada, Alaska, northern Minnesota, New Hampshire, Maine, and New York.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-8" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup>Cloudberries are a circumpolar boreal plant, occurring naturally throughout the<span> </span>Northern Hemisphere<span> </span>from 78°N, south to about 55°N, and are scattered south to 44°N mainly in mountainous areas and<span> </span>moorlands.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-4" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>In Europe, they grow in the<span> </span>Nordic countries,<span> </span>Baltic states<span> </span>and particularly in<span> </span>Poland.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-5" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>They occur across northern<span> </span>Russia<span> </span>east towards the<span> </span>Pacific Ocean<span> </span>as far south as<span> </span>Japan.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-6" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Due to peatland drainage and<span> </span>peat<span> </span>exploitation, they are considered<span> </span>endangered<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-7" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>and are under legal protection in Germany's<span> </span>Weser<span> </span>and<span> </span>Elbe<span> </span>valleys, and at isolated sites in the English<span> </span>Pennines<span> </span>and<span> </span>Scottish Highlands. A single, fragile site exists in the<span> </span>Sperrin Mountains<span> </span>of<span> </span>Northern Ireland.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <p>Wide distribution occurs due to the excretion of the indigestible seeds by birds and mammals. Further distribution arises through its<span> </span>rhizomes, which are up to 10 m (33 ft) long and grow about 10–15 cm (3.9–5.9 in) below the soil surface, developing extensive and dense berry patches.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-9" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Cuttings of these taken in May or August are successful in producing a genetic<span> </span>clone<span> </span>of the parent plant.<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup><span> </span>The cloudberry grows in<span> </span>bogs,<span> </span>marshes,<span> </span>wet meadows,<span> </span>tundra<span> </span>and altitudes of 1,400 metres (4,600 ft) above sea level in Norway, requiring acidic ground (between 3.5 and 5<span> </span><i>p</i>H).<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-10" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>Cloudberry leaves are food for<span> </span>caterpillars<span> </span>of several<span> </span>Lepidoptera<span> </span>species. The<span> </span>moth<span> </span><i>Coleophora thulea</i><span> </span>has no other known food plants. See also<span> </span>List of Lepidoptera that feed on Rubus.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Cloudberries.jpg/230px-Cloudberries.jpg" decoding="async" width="230" height="154" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Cloudberries.jpg/345px-Cloudberries.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Cloudberries.jpg/460px-Cloudberries.jpg 2x" data-file-width="1448" data-file-height="972" title="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Ripe cloudberries</div> </div> </div> <p>Despite great demand as a delicacy (particularly in Sweden, Norway and Finland) the cloudberry is not widely cultivated and is primarily a wild plant. Wholesale prices vary widely based on the size of the yearly harvest, but cloudberries have gone for as much as €10/kg (in 2004).<sup id="cite_ref-bloomberg-Heiskanen-&amp;-Erkheikki_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>Since the middle of the 1990s, however, the species has formed part of a multinational research project. Beginning in 2002, selected<span> </span>cultivars<span> </span>have been available to farmers, notably 'Apolto' (male), 'Fjellgull' (female) and 'Fjordgull' (female). The cloudberry can be cultivated in Arctic areas where few other crops are possible, for example along the northern coast of<span> </span>Norway.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg/230px-Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg" decoding="async" width="230" height="211" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg/345px-Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg/460px-Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg 2x" data-file-width="599" data-file-height="549" title="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Unripe cloudberry</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/03/Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg/230px-Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg" decoding="async" width="230" height="154" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/03/Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg/345px-Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/03/Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg/460px-Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2618" data-file-height="1752" title="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Cloudberry jam</div> </div> </div> <p>The ripe fruits are golden-yellow, soft and juicy, and are rich in<span> </span>vitamin C.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-11" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>When eaten fresh, cloudberries have a distinctive tart taste. When over-ripe, they have a creamy texture somewhat like yogurt and a sweetened flavor. They are often made into<span> </span>jams,<span> </span>juices, tarts, and liqueurs. In Finland, the berries are eaten with heated<span> </span><i lang="fi" title="Finnish language text">leipäjuusto</i><span> </span>(a local cheese; the name translates to "bread-cheese"), as well as<span> </span>cream<span> </span>and<span> </span>sugar. In Sweden, cloudberries (<i lang="sv" title="Swedish language text">hjortron</i>) and cloudberry jam are used as a topping for ice cream, pancakes, and waffles. In Norway, they are often mixed with<span> </span>whipped cream<span> </span>and sugar to be served as a dessert called<span> </span><i lang="no" title="Norwegian language text">multekrem</i><span> </span>(cloudberry cream), as a jam or as an ingredient in homemade ice cream. Cloudberry yoghurt—<i lang="no" title="Norwegian language text">molte-</i><span> </span>or<span> </span><i lang="no" title="Norwegian language text">multeyoughurt</i>—is a supermarket item in<span> </span>Norway.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>In<span> </span>Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, cloudberries are used to make "bakeapple pie" or jam.<span> </span>Arctic<span> </span>Yup'ik<span> </span>mix the berries with<span> </span>seal<span> </span>oil,<span> </span>reindeer<span> </span>or<span> </span>caribou<span> </span>fat (which is diced and made fluffy with seal oil) and sugar to make "Eskimo<span> </span>ice cream" or<span> </span>akutaq.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-12" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>The recipes vary by region. Along the<span> </span>Yukon<span> </span>and<span> </span>Kuskokwim River<span> </span>areas, white fish (pike) along with shortening and sugar are used. The berries are an important traditional food resource for the Yup'ik.</p> <p>Due to its high vitamin C content,<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-13" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>the berry is valued both by<span> </span>Nordic<span> </span>seafarers and Northern<span> </span>indigenous peoples. Its<span> </span>polyphenol<span> </span>content, including<span> </span>flavonoid<span> </span>compounds such as<span> </span>ellagic acid, appears to naturally preserve food preparations of the berries.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-14" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Cloudberries can be preserved in their own juice without added sugar, if stored cool.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup></p> <p>Extract of cloudberries is also used in cosmetics such as shower gels, hand creams and body lotions.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Alcoholic_drinks">Alcoholic drinks</span></h3> <p>In<span> </span>Nordic countries, traditional<span> </span>liqueurs<span> </span>such as<span> </span><i lang="fi" title="Finnish language text">lakkalikööri</i><span> </span>(Finland) are made of cloudberry, having a strong taste and high sugar content. Cloudberry is used as a flavouring for making<span> </span>akvavit. In northeastern<span> </span>Quebec, a cloudberry liqueur known as<span> </span><i lang="fr" title="French language text">chicoutai</i><span> </span>(aboriginal<span> </span>name) is made.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrients_and_phytochemicals">Nutrients and phytochemicals</span></h2> <p>Cloudberries are rich in<span> </span>vitamin C<span> </span>and<span> </span>ellagic acid,<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-15" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>citric acid,<span> </span>malic acid,<span> </span>α-tocopherol,<span> </span>anthocyanins<span> </span>and the<span> </span>provitamin A<span> </span>carotenoid,<span> </span>β-carotene<span> </span>in contents which differ across regions of Finland due to sunlight exposure, rainfall or temperature.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span>The<span> </span>ellagitannins<span> </span>lambertianin C<span> </span>and<span> </span>sanguiin H-6<span> </span>are also present.<sup id="cite_ref-Kahkonen_12-0" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>Genotype<span> </span>of cloudberry variants may also affect<span> </span>polyphenol<span> </span>composition, particularly for ellagitannins, sanguiin H-6, anthocyanins and<span> </span>quercetin.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>Polyphenol extracts from cloudberries have improved storage properties when<span> </span>microencapsulated<span> </span>using<span> </span>maltodextrin<span> </span>DE5-8.<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup><span> </span>At least 14<span> </span>volatile<span> </span>compounds, including<span> </span>vanillin, account for the<span> </span>aroma<span> </span>of cloudberries.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultural_references">Cultural references</span></h2> <p>The cloudberry appears on the<span> </span>Finnish<span> </span>version of the<span> </span>2 euro coin.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup><span> </span>The name of the hill<span> </span><i lang="gd" title="Scottish Gaelic language text">Beinn nan Oighreag</i><span> </span>in<span> </span>Breadalbane<span> </span>in the<span> </span>Scottish Highlands<span> </span>means "Hill of the Cloudberries" in<span> </span>Scottish Gaelic.<sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Harvesting_on_public_property">Harvesting on public property</span></h2> <p>In some<span> </span>northern European<span> </span>countries such as<span> </span>Norway, a common use policy to non-wood forest products allows anyone to pick cloudberries on public property and eat them on location, but only local residents may transport them from that location and only ripe berries may be picked.<sup id="cite_ref-berryFAO_18-0" class="reference">[18]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup><span> </span>Since 1970 in Norway, while it has been illegal to pick unripe cloudberries, transporting ripe cloudberries from the harvest location is permitted in many counties.</p> </body> </html>
V 100 RC
Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.

Variety from Japan
Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1

Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus...

Price €4.15 - SKU: V 118 Y
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 or 4 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The fruit looks somewhat like a small grapefruit with an uneven skin, and can be either yellow or green depending on the degree of ripeness. It is hardy to <strong>-20C.</strong></p> <p>Yuzu limes are small to medium in size, averaging 5-10 centimeters in diameter, and are round, oblate, to slightly lopsided in shape. The peel is thick, pebbly, rough, pocked with many prominent oil glands and pores, and matures from dark green to golden yellow. Underneath the peel, the yellow flesh is minimal, divided into 9-10 segments by white membranes, contains some juice, and is filled with many large, inedible cream-colored seeds. Yuzu limes are highly aromatic, and the rind is rich in essential oils that are released when the fruit’s surface is scratched or cut. The juice and zest also have a unique, acidic blend of sour, tart, and spicy flavors with notes of lime, grapefruit, mandarin. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Seasons/Availability</h2> <p><br />Yuzu limes are available in the winter through the early spring. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Current Facts</h2> <p><br />Yuzu limes, botanically classified as Citrus junos, are slow-growing citrus that are found on an evergreen tree or shrub that can reach over five meters in height and belongs to the Rutaceae family. Believed to be a hybrid between the satsuma mandarin and the ichang papeda, Yuzu limes are not botanically a lime but have earned the title since they are often prepared and used similarly. Yuzu limes are mainly cultivated in China, Japan, and Korea and are favored for their tart and spicy juice and zest. They are also valued for their strong fragrance and in Japan, it is one of the most popular scents to be used for cosmetics, candles, cleaning supplies, and bath products. While popular in Asia, Yuzu limes are still relatively unknown in the Western world, but they have been gaining awareness through famous chefs praising and using its unique flavor. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Nutritional Value</h2> <p><br />Yuzu limes are an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C. They also contain flavonoids, vitamin P which can help absorb other nutrients and increase circulation, and nomilin, which can help aid the body in relaxation. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Applications</h2> <p><br />Yuzu limes are best suited for both raw and cooked applications and are used for their juice and zest. When juiced, Yuzu limes can be mixed into sauces, vinegar, dressings, and marinades, or they can be shaken into cocktails, flavored water, and tea. Yuzu lime peels can also be used to flavor salted butter for seafood dishes, zested over salad or sashimi, used to flavor ponzu sauce, or ground into powdered form and sprinkled over dishes as a concentrated flavor. In addition to savory dishes, Yuzu lime juice and zest can be baked into tarts or pies, mixed into sorbets, or used in custard. Yuzu limes pair well with coriander, mint, eggs, sashimi, scallops, grilled fish, snow crab, poultry, steak, pork, pepper, black sesame seeds, cumin, lime, raspberry, pomegranate, and cherries. The fruits will keep two weeks when stored in the refrigerator. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Ethnic/Cultural Info</h2> <p><br />In Japan, the Yuzu lime is one of the most popular fragrances and is most well-known for its use in the winter solstice bath. Each year during the winter solstice, public bathhouses will slice the fruit in half and float them in hot water, creating an aromatic experience. This bathing practice dates back to the 18th century and soaking in Yuzu water is believed to help prevent sicknesses such as flu and colds, and the essential oils and vitamin C are believed to help soften the skin and relieve pain. In addition to bathing, the Yuzu fragrance is also utilized in Yuzu tama or Yuzu egg production. On the island of Shikoku, Japan, farmers feed their hens a mixture of Yuzu peel, sesame seeds, corn, and kale to naturally create an egg that has the flavor and scent of the Yuzu lime. These eggs are sold at a premium price and are traditionally used for tamago kake gohan, which is cooked rice with a raw egg mixed in. <br /><br /></p> <h2>Geography/History</h2> <p><br />The origins of Yuzu limes are somewhat disputed among scientists, but the majority of scientists conclude that the fruit’s origins are within the upper regions of the Yangtze River in China and have been growing since ancient times. Yuzu limes were then introduced to Japan in 710 CE where they became increasingly popular for their light scent. In 1914, Frank Meyer, the man who discovered the Meyer lemon, visited China and brought seeds from the Yuzu fruit back to the United States. Included in his description of the fruit, he noted that he sourced the seeds from the Hubei Provence along the upper slopes of the Yangtze River at an astonishing elevation of 4,000 feet. The temperatures dip below freezing in that area, and there are no other citrus varieties that grow near the region. Today Yuzu limes are predominately available at local markets in Asia, but there are also a few farms in the United States that commercially cultivate the fruit and sell at farmers markets and specialty grocers</p> </body> </html>
V 118 Y 2-S
Yuzu Seeds Japanese citrus fruit -20°C (Citrus junos) 4.15 - 1

Variety from Peru
Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6

Purple Corn Seeds - Maíz...

Price €2.25 - SKU: P 397
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Purple Corn - Maíz Morado "Kculli" - Purple Maize Seeds</strong> <strong>(Zea mays amylaceaa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0101;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Purple corn, a variety of Zea mays, is an Andean crop from low valleys locally called maiz Morado. Purple corn can be found mostly in Peru, where it is cultivated on the coast, as well as in lands almost ten thousand feet high. There are different varieties of purple corn, and all of them originated from an ancestral line called “Kculli”, still cultivated in Peru. The Kculli line is very old, and ancient objects in the shape of these particular ears of corn have been found in archeological sites at least 2,500 years old in places on the central coast, as well as among the ceramics of the “Mochica” culture.</p> <p>The kernels of purple corn are soaked in hot water by people of the Andes to yield a deep purple color for foods and beverages, a practice now recognized for its industrial uses as a colorant. Common in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru, purple corn is used in chicha Morada, a drink made by boiling ground purple corn kernels with pineapple, cinnamon, clove, and sugar, and in mazamorra, a type of pudding. One of the most popular purple corn food uses is the "Api", a smoothie served hot and sometimes called "Inca's dessert".</p> <p>Purple corn contains substantial amounts of phenolics and anthocyanins, among other phytochemicals. Its main colorant is cianidin-3-b-glucosa. People of the Andes make a refreshing drink from purple corn called "chicha Morada" which is now recognized as a nutritive powerhouse due to its phenolic content. Phenolics are known to have many bioactive and functional properties. Research shows that crops with the highest total phenolic and anthocyanin content also have the highest antioxidant activity.</p> <p>Anthocyaninins are a type of complex flavonoid that produce blue, purple or red colors. </p> <p>Purple Corn has a higher antioxidant capacity and antiradical kinetics than blueberries and higher or similar anthocyanin and phenolic contents.</p> </body> </html>
P 397 10S
Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6
Black Pepper Seeds (Piper...

Black Pepper Seeds (Piper...

Price €1.95 - SKU: MHS 56 PN
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Black Pepper Seeds (Piper nigrum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. When dried, the fruit is known as a peppercorn. When fresh and fully mature, it is approximately 5 millimeters (0.20 in) in diameter, dark red, and, like all drupes, contains a single seed. Peppercorns, and the ground pepper derived from them, maybe described simply as pepper, or more precisely as black pepper (cooked and dried unripe fruit), green pepper (dried unripe fruit) and white pepper (ripe fruit seeds).</p> <p>Black pepper is native to south India and is extensively cultivated there and elsewhere in tropical regions. Currently, Vietnam is the world's largest producer and exporter of pepper, producing 34% of the world's Piper nigrum crop as of 2013.</p> <p>Dried ground pepper has been used since antiquity for both its flavor and as traditional medicine. Black pepper is the world's most traded spice. It is one of the most common spices added to cuisines around the world. The spiciness of black pepper is due to the chemical piperine, not to be confused with the capsaicin characteristic of fresh hot peppers. Black pepper is ubiquitous in the modern world as a seasoning and is often paired with salt.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The word "pepper" has its roots in the Dravidian word for long pepper, pippali.[2][3][4] Ancient Greek and Latin turned pippali into the Greek πέπερι peperi and then into the Latin piper, which was used by the Romans to refer both to black pepper and long pepper, as the Romans erroneously believed that both of these spices were derived from the same plant.[5] Today's "pepper" derives from the Old English pipor. The Latin word is also the source of Romanian piper, Italian pepe, Dutch peper, German Pfeffer, French poivre, and other similar forms.</p> <p>In the 16th century, pepper started referring to the unrelated New World chili pepper as well. "Pepper" was used in a figurative sense to mean "spirit" or "energy" at least as far back as the 1840s; in the early 20th century, this was shortened to pep.</p> <p><strong>Black pepper</strong></p> <p>Black pepper is produced from the still-green, unripe drupes of the pepper plant. The drupes are cooked briefly in hot water, both to clean them and to prepare them for drying. The heat ruptures cell walls in the pepper, speeding the work of browning enzymes during drying. The drupes are dried in the sun or by machine for several days, during which the pepper around the seed shrinks and darkens into a thin, wrinkled black layer. Once dried, the spice is called black peppercorn. On some estates, the berries are separated from the stem by hand and then sun-dried without the boiling process.</p> <p>Once the peppercorns are dried, pepper spirit and oil can be extracted from the berries by crushing them. Pepper spirit is used in many medicinal and beauty products. Pepper oil is also used as an ayurvedic massage oil and used in certain beauty and herbal treatments.</p> <p><strong>Plant</strong></p> <p>The pepper plant is a perennial woody vine growing up to 4 meters (13 ft) in height on supporting trees, poles, or trellises. It is a spreading vine, rooting readily where trailing stems touch the ground. The leaves are alternate, entire, 5 to 10 centimetres (2.0 to 3.9 in) long and 3 to 6 centimetres (1.2 to 2.4 in) across. The flowers are small, produced on pendulous spikes 4 to 8 centimetres (1.6 to 3.1 in) long at the leaf nodes, the spikes lengthening up to 7 to 15 centimetres (2.8 to 5.9 in) as the fruit matures.[15] The fruit of the black pepper is called a drupe and when dried is known as a peppercorn.</p> <p>Pepper can be grown in soil that is neither too dry nor susceptible to flooding, moist, well-drained and rich in organic matter (the vines do not do too well over an altitude of 900 m (3,000 ft) above sea level). The plants are propagated by cuttings about 40 to 50 centimetres (16 to 20 in) long, tied up to neighbouring trees or climbing frames at distances of about 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) apart; trees with rough bark are favoured over those with smooth bark, as the pepper plants climb rough bark more readily. Competing plants are cleared away, leaving only sufficient trees to provide shade and permit free ventilation. The roots are covered in leaf mulch and manure, and the shoots are trimmed twice a year. On dry soils the young plants require watering every other day during the dry season for the first three years. The plants bear fruit from the fourth or fifth year, and typically continue to bear fruit for seven years. The cuttings are usually cultivars, selected both for yield and quality of fruit.</p> <p>A single stem will bear 20 to 30 fruiting spikes. The harvest begins as soon as one or two fruits at the base of the spikes begin to turn red, and before the fruit is fully mature, and still hard; if allowed to ripen completely, the fruit lose pungency, and ultimately fall off and are lost. The spikes are collected and spread out to dry in the sun, then the peppercorns are stripped off the spikes.[15]</p> <p>Black pepper is either native to Southeast Asia[16] or South Asia.[17] Within the genus Piper, it is most closely related to other Asian species such as Piper caninum.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Pepper is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia and has been known to Indian cooking since at least 2000 BCE.[20] J. Innes Miller notes that while pepper was grown in southern Thailand and in Malaysia, its most important source was India, particularly the Malabar Coast, in what is now the state of Kerala[21] Peppercorns were a much-prized trade good, often referred to as "black gold" and used as a form of commodity money. The legacy of this trade remains in some Western legal systems which recognize the term "peppercorn rent" as a form of a token payment made for something that is in fact being given.</p> <p>The ancient history of black pepper is often interlinked with (and confused with) that of long pepper, the dried fruit of closely related Piper longum. The Romans knew of both and often referred to either as just "piper". In fact, it was not until the discovery of the New World and of chili peppers that the popularity of long pepper entirely declined. Chili peppers, some of which when dried are similar in shape and taste to long pepper, were easier to grow in a variety of locations more convenient to Europe.</p> <p>Before the 16th century, pepper was being grown in Java, Sunda, Sumatra, Madagascar, Malaysia, and everywhere in Southeast Asia. These areas traded mainly with China, or used the pepper locally.[22] Ports in the Malabar area also served as a stop-off point for much of the trade in other spices from farther east in the Indian Ocean. Following the British hegemony in India, virtually all of the black pepper found in Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa was traded from Malabar region.</p> <p><strong>Ancient times</strong></p> <p>Black peppercorns were found stuffed in the nostrils of Ramesses II, placed there as part of the mummification rituals shortly after his death in 1213 BCE.[23] Little else is known about the use of pepper in ancient Egypt and how it reached the Nile from South Asia.</p> <p>Pepper (both long and black) was known in Greece at least as early as the 4th century BCE, though it was probably an uncommon and expensive item that only the very rich could afford. Trade routes of the time were by land, or in ships which hugged the coastlines of the Arabian Sea. Long pepper, growing in the north-western part of India, was more accessible than the black pepper from further south; this trade advantage, plus long pepper's greater spiciness, probably made black pepper less popular at the time.</p> <p>By the time of the early Roman Empire, especially after Rome's conquest of Egypt in 30 BCE, open-ocean crossing of the Arabian Sea direct to southern India's Malabar Coast was near routine. Details of this trading across the Indian Ocean have been passed down in the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea. According to the Roman geographer Strabo, the early Empire sent a fleet of around 120 ships on an annual one-year trip to China, Southeast Asia, India and back. The fleet timed its travel across the Arabian Sea to take advantage of the predictable monsoon winds. Returning from India, the ships travelled up the Red Sea, from where the cargo was carried overland or via the Nile-Red Sea canal to the Nile River, barged to Alexandria, and shipped from there to Italy and Rome. The rough geographical outlines of this same trade route would dominate the pepper trade into Europe for a millennium and a half to come.</p> <p>With ships sailing directly to the Malabar coast, black pepper was now travelling a shorter trade route than long pepper, and the prices reflected it. Pliny the Elder's Natural History tells us the prices in Rome around 77 CE: "Long pepper ... is fifteen denarii per pound, while that of white pepper is seven, and of black, four." Pliny also complains "there is no year in which India does not drain the Roman Empire of fifty million sesterces," and further moralizes on pepper:</p> <p>    It is quite surprising that the use of pepper has come so much into fashion, seeing that in other substances which we use, it is sometimes their sweetness, and sometimes their appearance that has attracted our notice; whereas, pepper has nothing in it that can plead as a recommendation to either fruit or berry, its only desirable quality being a certain pungency; and yet it is for this that we import it all the way from India! Who was the first to make trial of it as an article of food? and who, I wonder, was the man that was not content to prepare himself by hunger only for the satisfying of a greedy appetite?</p> <p>Black pepper was a well-known and widespread, if expensive, seasoning in the Roman Empire. Apicius' De re coquinaria, a 3rd-century cookbook probably based at least partly on one from the 1st century CE, includes pepper in a majority of its recipes. Edward Gibbon wrote, in The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, that pepper was "a favorite ingredient of the most expensive Roman cookery".</p> <p><strong>Phytochemicals, folk medicine, and research</strong></p> <p>Like many eastern spices, pepper was historically both a seasoning and a folk medicine. Long pepper, being stronger, was often the preferred medication, but both were used. Black pepper (or perhaps long pepper) was believed to cure several illnesses, such as constipation, insomnia, oral abscesses, sunburn and toothaches, among others.[35] Various sources from the 5th century onward recommended pepper to treat eye problems, often by applying salves or poultices made with pepper directly to the eye. There is no current medical evidence that any of these treatments has any benefit.</p> <p>Pepper is known to cause sneezing. Some sources say that piperine, a substance present in black pepper, irritates the nostrils, causing the sneezing.[37] Few, if any, controlled studies have been carried out to answer the question.</p> <p>Piperine is under study for its potential to increase absorption of selenium, vitamin B, beta-carotene and curcumin, as well as other compounds.[38] As a folk medicine, pepper appears in the Buddhist Samaññaphala Sutta, chapter five, as one of the few medicines allowed to be carried by a monk.[39] Pepper contains phytochemicals,[40] including amides, piperidines, pyrrolidines and trace amounts of safrole which may be carcinogenic in laboratory rodents.</p> <p>Piperine is under study for a variety of possible physiological effects,[42] although this work is preliminary and mechanisms of activity for piperine in the human body remain unknown.</p> <p><strong>Nutrition</strong></p> <p>One tablespoon (6 grams) of ground black pepper contains moderate amounts of vitamin K (13% of the daily value or DV), iron (10% DV) and manganese (18% DV), with trace amounts of other essential nutrients, protein and dietary fibre.</p> <p><strong>Flavor</strong></p> <p>Pepper gets its spicy heat mostly from piperine derived both from the outer fruit and the seed. Black pepper contains between 4.6% and 9.7% piperine by mass, and white pepper slightly more than that.[44] Refined piperine, by weight, is about one percent as hot as the capsaicin found in chili peppers.[45] The outer fruit layer, left on black pepper, also contains important odour-contributing terpenes including pinene, sabinene, limonene, caryophyllene, and linalool, which give citrusy, woody, and floral notes. These scents are mostly missing in white pepper, which is stripped of the fruit layer. White pepper can gain some different odours (including musty notes) from its longer fermentation stage.[46] The aroma of pepper is attributed to rotundone (3,4,5,6,7,8-Hexahydro-3α,8α-dimethyl-5α-(1-methylethenyl)azulene-1(2H)-one), a sesquiterpene originally discovered in the tubers of cyperus rotundus, which can be detected in concentrations of 0.4 nanograms/L in water and in wine: rotundone is also present in marjoram, oregano, rosemary, basil, thyme, and geranium, as well as in some Shiraz wines.</p> <p>Pepper loses flavour and aroma through evaporation, so airtight storage helps preserve its spiciness longer. Pepper can also lose flavour when exposed to light, which can transform piperine into nearly tasteless isochavicine. Once ground, pepper's aromatics can evaporate quickly; most culinary sources recommend grinding whole peppercorns immediately before use for this reason. Handheld pepper mills or grinders, which mechanically grind or crush whole peppercorns, are used for this, sometimes instead of pepper shakers that dispense pre-ground pepper. Spice mills such as pepper mills were found in European kitchens as early as the 14th century, but the mortar and pestle used earlier for crushing pepper have remained a popular method for centuries as well.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 56 PN
Black Pepper Seeds (Piper nigrum)

This plant has giant fruits
Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11

Giant Water Lily Lotus...

Price €2.25 - SKU: F 78
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0606; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Queen of the water lilies, this Amazonian giant has a remarkable life cycle.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica is well known for its huge circular leaves, which are often pictured with a small child sitting supported in the centre as a demonstration of their size and strength. The species is highly prized as an ornamental, despite having somewhat particular requirements for successful cultivation.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica seeds from Thailand that have a perfectly can grow every weather that have a very big size most 3.5 metre. The seeds very fresh easy for grow the most quality 85%. Every seeds had quality cue in with thoroughly.</span></p> <h2><span>How To Grow Victoria amazonica Seeds</span></h2> <p><span>Put the seeds in to washtub and wait 5 weeks.</span></p> <p><span>When the roots thrown out and flowers thrive then after that put the underground and wait for until the lotus grow up.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>WIKIPEDIA:</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Victoria amazonica is a species of flowering plant, the largest of the Nymphaeaceae family of water lilies. It is the National flower of Guyana.</span></p> <p><span>The species has very large leaves, up to 3 m in diameter, that float on the water's surface on a submerged stalk, 7–8 m in length. The species was once called Victoria regia after Queen Victoria, but the name was superseded. V. amazonica is native to the shallow waters of the Amazon River basin, such as oxbow lakes and bayous. It is depicted in the Guyanese coat of arms. The flowers are white the first night they are open and become pink the second night. They are up to 40 cm in diameter, and are pollinated by beetles. This process was described in detail by Sir Ghillean Prance and Jorge Arius.[4][5]It is the largest waterlily in the world.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Classification</span></strong></p> <p><span>A member of the genus Victoria placed in the Nymphaeaceae family or, sometimes, in the Euryalaceae.[6] The first published description of the genus was by John Lindley in October 1837, based on specimens of this plant returned from British Guiana by Robert Schomburgk. Lindley named the genus after the newly ascended Queen Victoria, and the species Victoria regia.[1] The spelling in Schomburgk's description in Athenaeum, published the month before, was given as Victoria Regina.[2] Despite this spelling being adopted by the Botanical Society of London for their new emblem, Lindley's was the version used throughout the nineteenth century.</span></p> <p><span>An earlier account of the species, Euryale amazonica by Eduard Friedrich Poeppig, in 1832 described an affinity with Euryale ferox. A collection and description was also made by the French botanist Aimé Bonpland in 1825.[1][1][8] In 1850 James De Carle Sowerby[9] recognised Poeppig's earlier description and transferred its epithet amazonica. The new name was rejected by Lindley. The current name, Victoria amazonica, did not come into widespread use until the twentieth century.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>Victoria regia, as it was named, was discovered by Tadeáš Haenke in 1801.[10] It was once the subject of rivalry between Victorian gardeners in England. Always on the look out for a spectacular new species with which to impress their peers, Victorian "Gardeners"[11] such as the Duke of Devonshire, and the Duke of Northumberland started a well-mannered competition to become the first to cultivate and bring to flower this enormous lily. In the end, the two aforementioned Dukes became the first to achieve this, Joseph Paxton (for the Duke of Devonshire) being the first in November 1849 by replicating the lily's warm swampy habitat (not easy in winter in England with only coal-fired boilers for heating), and a "Mr Ivison" the second and more constantly successful (for Northumberland) at Syon House.</span></p> <p><span>The species captured the imagination of the public, and was the subject of several dedicated monographs. The botanical illustrations of cultivated specimens in Fitch and W.J. Hooker's 1851 work Victoria Regia[12] received critical acclaim in the Athenaeum, "they are accurate, and they are beautiful".[13] The Duke of Devonshire presented Queen Victoria with one of the first of these flowers, and named it in her honour. The lily, with ribbed undersurface and leaves veining "like transverse girders and supports", was Paxton's inspiration for The Crystal Palace, a building four times the size of St. Peter's in Rome.</span></p> <h2><strong>Video:</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #fc0303;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkI9-rhumbs" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color: #fc0303;">How To Grow Lotus From Seeds </span></a></span><br /></strong></h2> </body> </html>
F 78
Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11
Royal Poinciana, Flamboyant Seeds (Delonix regia) 2.25 - 1

Royal Poinciana, Flamboyant...

Price €2.45 - SKU: T 49
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Royal Poinciana or Flamboyant Seeds (Delonix regia)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Delonix regia is a species of flowering plant in the family Fabaceae, subfamily Caesalpinioideae. It is noted for its fern-like leaves and flamboyant display of flowers. In many tropical parts of the world it is grown as an ornamental tree and in English it is given the name Royal Poinciana or Flamboyant. It is also one of several trees known as Flame tree.</p> <p>In India it is known as Gulmohar in Hindi. It is also known there as Krishnachura or Krusnachuda (Bengali/Oriya: crown of the Krishna) and Krishnasura (in Assamese and Bengali). In Kerala, it is known as Kaalvaripoo (കാൽവരിപ്പൂവ്). In Vietnam, it is known as Phượng vĩ (means "Phoenix's Tail) (Vietnamese), Malinche, and Tabachine.[1] In Khmer, the tree and the flower is known collectively as "Peacock" or ដើម (tree) or ផ្កា (flower) «ក្ងោក»។ . In Guatemala, Antigua Guatemala, it is known as llama del bosque and in Paraguay as chivato, in Cuba as flamboyán (taken from the French flamboyant).</p> <p>This species was previously placed in the genus Poinciana, named for Phillippe de Longvilliers de Poincy, the 17th century governor of Saint Christophe (Saint Kitts). It is a non nodulating legume.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The tree's vivid red/vermilion/orange/yellow flowers and bright green foliage make it an exceptionally striking sight.</p> <p>The Delonix Regia is found in Madagascar's dry deciduous forests. In the wild it is endangered, but it is widely cultivated elsewhere. In addition to its ornamental value, it is also a useful shade tree in tropical conditions, because it usually grows to a modest height (mostly 5 meters, but it can reach an maximum height of 12 meters) but spreads widely, and its dense foliage provides full shade. In areas with a marked dry season, it sheds its leaves during the drought, but in other areas it is virtually evergreen. Flowers appear in corymbs along and at the ends of branches. Pods are green and flaccid when young and turn dark-brown and woody.</p> <p>The flowers are large, with four spreading scarlet or orange-red petals up to 8 cm long, and a fifth upright petal called the standard, which is slightly larger and spotted with yellow and white. The naturally occurring variety flavida has yellow flowers.[2] Seed pods are dark brown and can be up to 60 cm long and 5 cm wide; the individual seeds, however, are small, weighing around 0.4 g on average. The compound leaves have a feathery appearance and are a characteristic light, bright green. They are doubly pinnate: Each leaf is 30–50 cm long and has 20 to 40 pairs of primary leaflets or pinnae on it, and each of these is further divided into 10-20 pairs of secondary leaflets or pinnules.</p> <p><strong>Cultural significance</strong></p> <p>In the Indian state of Kerala, Royal Poinciana is called Kaalvarippoo which means the flower of Calvary. There is a popular belief among Saint Thomas Christians of Kerala that when Jesus was crucified, there was a small Royal Poinciana tree nearby his Cross. It is believed that the blood of Jesus Christ was shed over the flowers of the tree and this is how the flowers of Royal Poinciana got a sharp red color.</p> <p><strong>Propagation</strong></p> <p>The Royal Poinciana is most commonly propagated by seeds. Seeds are collected, soaked in warm water for at least 24 hours, and planted in warm, moist soil in a semi-shaded, sheltered position. In lieu of soaking, the seeds can also be 'nicked' or 'pinched' (with a small scissors or nail clipper) and planted immediately. These two methods allow moisture to penetrate the tough outer casing, stimulating germination. The seedlings grow rapidly and can reach 30 cm in a few weeks under ideal conditions.</p> <p>Less common, but just as effective, is propagation by semi-hardwood cuttings. Branches consisting of the current or last season's growth can be cut into 30 cm sections and planted in a moist potting mixture. This method is slower than seed propagation (cuttings take a few months to root) but is the preferred method for ensuring new trees are true to form. As such, cuttings are a particularly common method of propagation for the rarer yellow-flowering variety of the tree.</p> <p><strong>Flowering season</strong></p> <p>    Bangladesh: April–May</p> <p>    South Florida: May–June</p> <p>    Egypt: May–June</p> <p>    Vietnam: May–July</p> <p>    Caribbean: May–September</p> <p>    Indian Subcontinent: April–June</p> <p>    Australia: November–February</p> <p>    Northern Mariana Islands: March–June</p> <p>    United Arab Emirates: May–July</p> <p>    Brazil: November–February</p> <p>    Southern Sudan: March–May</p> <p>    Thailand: April–May</p> <p>    Philippines: April–May</p> <p>    Peru (coast): January-March</p> <p>    Zambia and Zimbabwe: October–December</p> <p>    Hong Kong: May–June</p> <p>    Mauritius: November–December</p> <p>    Israel: May–June</p> </div>
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Royal Poinciana, Flamboyant Seeds (Delonix regia) 2.25 - 1