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Best sellers

There are 611 products.

Showing 1-12 of 611 item(s)

Variety from Serbia
Somborka hot bell pepper seeds

Somborka hot bell pepper seeds

Price €1.85
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>SOMBORKA hot bell pepper seeds - Serbian variety</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 or 200 (1,14 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This variety comes from Serbia. And the name has gotten to the city of <strong>Sombor</strong>. Read more about <strong><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sombor" target="_blank" title="Read more about Sombor city here" rel="noreferrer noopener">Sombor</a><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sombor" target="_blank" title="Read more about Sombor city here" rel="noreferrer noopener"> city here</a>.</strong></p> <p>SOMBORKA is the earliest variety of hot paprika with a conical shape that is suitable for growing outdoors as well as in a greenhouse. Somborka is the most popular pepper in Serbia when it comes to pickling.</p> <p>The meat is juicy and thick, light yellow in technical maturity, red in botanical color.</p> <p>It is harvested 5-6 times a season. Possible yield is 35-40 t / ha.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Serbian variety</strong></span></p> </body> </html>
P 183 20S
Somborka hot bell pepper seeds

Persian lime Seeds – limoo, Tahiti lime  - 3

Tahiti Lime Seeds (Citrus...

Price €1.95
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Persian lime Seeds – limoo, Tahiti lime,  Bearss lime (Citrus latifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Persian lime (Citrus × latifolia) or limoo is also known as Tahiti lime or Bearss lime (named after John T. Bearss, who developed this seedless variety about 1895 in his nursery at Porterville, California), is a citrus fruit related to the standard lime. It has a uniquely fragrant, spicy aroma.</p> <p>The fruit is about 6 cm in diameter, often with slightly nippled ends, and is usually sold while green, although it yellows as it reaches full ripeness. It is also widely available dried, as it is often used this way in Persian cooking. It is larger, thicker-skinned, with less intense citrus aromatics than the key lime (Citrus aurantifolia).</p> <p>The advantages of the Persian lime in commercial agriculture compared to the Key lime are the larger size, absence of seeds, hardiness, absence of thorns on the bushes, and longer fruit shelf life.</p> <p><strong>They are less acidic than key limes and don't have the bitterness that lends to the key lime's unique flavor.</strong></p> <p>Persian limes are commercialized primarily in six sizes, known as 110s, 150's, 175's, 200's, 230's and 250's. Once grown primarily in Florida in the U.S, it rose to prominence after Key lime orchards were wiped out there by a hurricane in 1926, according to the American Pomological Society, subsequently, Persian lime orchards themselves were devastated by Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Large numbers of Persian limes are grown, processed, and exported every year primarily from Mexico[1] to the American, European and Asian markets. U.S. Persian lime imports from Mexico are handled mostly through McAllen, Texas.</p> <p>Persian limes originate from the Far East and were first grown on a large scale in Persia (now Iran) and southern Iraq.</p> </body> </html>
V 119
Persian lime Seeds – limoo, Tahiti lime  - 3
"DUKE" Highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)

DUKE Blueberry Seeds...

Price €1.95
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>DUKE Northern highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,015g) seeds. </strong></span></h2> <p>Duke blueberries are the leading early-ripening (berries begin ripening in early June) blueberry variety. It is known for its high yields (one Duke plant can produce over 9 kg (20 lbs) of uniform-sized, quality fruits. Duke’s mild flavor seems to improve with cold storage.</p> <p>Maintaining the plant vigor of Duke blueberries can be a challenge over a long period of time. Growers must choose a quality growing site and continually employ good cultural practices.</p> <p>The Duke blueberry is one of the leading candidates for mechanical harvest, fresh, and process sales.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Many wild species of Vaccinium are thought to have been cultivated by Native Americans for thousands of years, with intentional crop burnings in northeastern areas being apparent from archeological evidence.[9] V. corymbosum, being one of the species likely used by these peoples, was later studied and domesticated in 1908 by Frederick Vernon Coville.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>In natural habitats it is a food source for native and migrating birds, bears, and small mammals.</p> <p>The berries were collected and used in Native American cuisine in areas where Vaccinium corymbosum grew as a native plant.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Vaccinium corymbosum is the most common commercially grown blueberry in present-day North America. It is also cultivated as an ornamental plant for home and wildlife gardens and natural landscaping projects.</p> <h2><em><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Germination instructions</strong></span></em></h2> <p>Northern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium Corymbosum) – Soak the seeds in a small container of hand hot water and leave to cool for 24 hours. Then sow the seeds on the surface of free-draining, damp, lime-free seed compost and only just cover with compost. 90 days cold stratification at approx 3C° is now required, which can be achieved by either, covering and placing outside in a cold shaded area, or by sealing the pot in a plastic bag and place in a refrigerator. Then move indoors or to a propagator at a minimum temperature of 21C°, until after germination. When large enough to handle, transplant individual seedlings into 9cm pots of ericaceous compost and grow on. Protect from frost. Plant outdoors from June onwards, after hardening off.</p> </body> </html>
V 194 D
"DUKE" Highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)

Variety from Serbia
Matica Sweet Pepper Seeds  - 1

Matica Sweet Pepper Seeds

Price €1.85
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Matica Sweet Pepper Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 60 (0.4g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Matica sweet pepper is one of the favorite medium late Serbian varieties in Serbia. The fruit has a Conical shape with a single tip, reminiscent of the old native variety Somborka, but is sweet pepper. The weight of the fruit is 70-100 g and the thickness of the pericarp 5-6 mm. </p> <p>In technological maturity, the fruit is light green to yellow, and in physiological intense red. A favorite variety for baked peppers, because it is easy to separate the skin from the meat of the fruit and is, therefore, a favorite with housewives in Serbia.</p>
P 2 M (0.4g)
Matica Sweet Pepper Seeds  - 1
  • New
Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature

Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds -...

Price €3.00
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p class=""><strong>Tropical Dwarf Papaya is fast-growing papaya it only reaches 170 cm to 200 cm but bears fruits as large as 1 kg in 6-8 months from seed.</strong></p> <p>Papaya (Carica papaya L.) - Deliciously sweet with musky undertones and a soft, butter-like consistency, it is no wonder the papaya was reputably called the "fruit of the angels" by Christopher Columbus. Once considered quite exotic, they can now be found in markets throughout the year. Although there is a slight seasonal peak in early summer and fall, papaya trees produce fruit year-round.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papayas are fruits that remind us of the tropics, the regions of the world in which they are grown. Once considered an exotic fruit, papayas' rise in popularity has made them much more available. Papaya fruits are good sources of Vitamin A, B, and C.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papayas are spherical or pear-shaped fruits that can be as long as 20 inches. The ones commonly found in the market usually average about 7 inches and weigh about one pound. Their flesh is a rich orange color with either yellow or pink hues.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papaya has a wonderfully soft, butter-like consistency and a deliciously sweet, musky taste. Inside the inner cavity of the fruit are black, round seeds encased in a gelatinous-like substance. Papaya's seeds are edible, although their peppery flavor is somewhat bitter.&nbsp;</p> <p>The fruit, as well as the other parts of the papaya tree, contain papain, an enzyme that helps digest proteins. This enzyme is especially concentrated in the fruit when it is unripe. Papain is extracted to make digestive enzyme dietary supplements and is also used as an ingredient in some chewing gums.&nbsp;</p> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/indian-dwarf-papaya-seeds-paw-paw-miniature.html" target="_blank" title="How To Grow Papaya From Seed" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>How To Grow Papaya From Seed</strong></a></h2> <p>Select a sunny and sheltered place in your garden. That's right, in your garden. Don't start them in pots!</p> <p>Papayas don't transplant well. Anything that disturbs the roots of papayas really sets them back. They just hate it. The most foolproof way to grow papayas is to simply plant them where they are to live.</p> <p>Papaya trees are very, very hungry. That means they need very good soil, rich in organic matter and nutrients.</p> <p>If you don't have fabulous soil, make some. Dig a hole half a meter across and fill it with a mix of good compost and soil. Actually, make at least two or three such planting beds in different locations.</p> <p>Now sprinkle on some of your seeds. A couple of dozen per bed is a good amount. Cover the seeds lightly with more compost, and then mulch the patch well. The seeds usually take about a couple of weeks to germinate and may take longer.</p> <p>Soon you will notice that your seedlings are very different in size and vigor. That's why we planted so many. Start culling the weaker ones. Pull them out while still small, or cut bigger ones down to the ground. Only keep the very best.</p> <p>At this stage, you should keep about half a dozen plants. Papaya plants can be male, female, or bisexual, and you want to make sure that you have some females or bisexual plants amongst your seedlings. The male papayas don't bear fruit.</p> <p>Papayas start flowering when they are about one meter tall. The male's flower first. Male flowers have long, thin stalks with several small blooms. Female flowers are usually single blooms, bigger, and very close to the trunk.&nbsp;</p> <p>Cull most of the male plants. You only need one male for every ten to fifteen female plants to ensure good pollination.</p> <p>And that's it. You should end up with one very strong and healthy female plant per bed. (And a male plant somewhere...) If the weather is warm enough, and if you are growing your papayas in full sun and in good soil, then you could be picking the first ripe fruit within 10 months.</p> <h3>How much water?</h3> <p>Papayas have large soft leaves. They evaporate a lot of water in warm weather, so they need a lot of water. But unfortunately, papayas are very susceptible to root rot, especially in cool weather. Overwatering is the most common reason for problems when growing papayas.</p> <p>It depends on the temperature and on the overall health and vigor of the plant. A healthier plant will cope better, but in general, you should be careful not to overwater during periods of cool weather.</p> <h3>Growing Papaya In Cooler Climates</h3> <p>If you get at least long hot summers you could grow papaya just as an ornamental plant. In this case, you would start them in a pot indoors to gain extra time. Plant them out against a sun-facing wall and enjoy the tropical look. However, you won't be able to keep your papaya alive long enough to get fruit.</p> <p>The only other option is growing papaya in a huge pot, and to keep the pot in a heated greenhouse in winter. You may also grow papaya as an annual decorative plant.</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">regular watering during the growth period + dry between waterings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
V 22 M
Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.

This plant has giant fruits
Giant Kiwifruit Seeds

Giant Kiwifruit Seeds...

Price €1.95
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>GIANT KIWIFRUIT SEEDS</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;"><strong>Gigant fruits which have a weight of 170 grams.</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Once known as Chinese gooseberry in Europe, the kiwi first came to the United States in the early 1900s. Fuzzy, brown and oblong, the kiwi does not require peeling before eating. The kiwi plant has a life expectancy of 50 years. If you live within USDA hardiness zone seven through nine, you can grow a kiwi plant from the seeds of a kiwi fruit. But keep in mind, you must plant more than one kiwi plant, spaced 10 feet apart, in order for the plants to produce kiwi fruits in three to four years</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">Health Benefits of Kiwi Fruit</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">1. Prevents asthma and other respiratory diseases</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">2. Fights cardiovascular diseases</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">3. Anti cancer</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">4. Digestive health</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">5. Protects your eyes</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">6. Manage blood pressure</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">7. Good for skin</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">8. Boosts immunity</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">9. Fights male impotency</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">10. Supports healthy birth</span></p> <h2><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;"><strong>How to Grow:</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">1. Lay the seeds on a paper towel to dry out. Place the seeds in an area where they will remain undisturbed for two days.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">2. Fill a plastic baggie with perlite. Add the dried kiwi seeds to the perlite, seal the baggie and place it in the refrigerator for a minimum of four months.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">3. Fill a 6-inch pot with sterilized potting soil. Remove the kiwi seeds from the refrigerator and plant them in the potting soil at a depth of 1/8 of an inch.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">4. Moisten the soil with a spray bottle of water and cover the pot with a piece of saran wrap, secured with a rubber band. Place the pot in a warm area while the kiwi seeds germinate.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">5. Remove the plastic wrap once the kiwi seeds begin to sprout, and continue spraying the kiwi seeds with water to keep the soil moist. Place the pot in an area that receives direct sunlight for at least six hours per day.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">6. Transplant the kiwi seedlings outdoors, in the spring, in well-drained soil that has a pH between 5.5 to 7.0. Test the soil to determine the acidity before planting, using a soil pH testing kit. If necessary, amend the soil with lime raise the pH and peat moss to lower it.</span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000;font-family:'book antiqua', palatino, serif;font-size:13pt;">7. Water the kiwi plants at a rate of 1-inch of water per week for the first year, using a soaker hose. Fertilize the kiwi with a 10-10-10 fertilizer according to label instructions.</span></p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>about 2-3 months in a moist substrate at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>all year round&gt; Autumn / Winter preferred</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>10-15 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>3-12 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"></td> <td valign="top"> <p><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery </em></span><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table></div>
V 28 G
Giant Kiwifruit Seeds
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose...

Price €2.35
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 1g (+-10) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Argyreia nervosa is a perennial climbing vine that is native to the Indian subcontinent and introduced to numerous areas worldwide, including Hawaii, Africa, and the Caribbean. Though it can be invasive, it is often prized for its aesthetic value. Common names include Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, Adhoguda अधोगुडा or Vidhara विधारा (Sanskrit), Elephant Creeper and Woolly Morning Glory. There are two botanical varieties: Argyreia nervosavar. nervosa described here, and Argyrea nervosa var. speciosa, a species used in ayurvedic medicine, but with little to no psychoactive value.</p> <p>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose seeds may be consumed for their various ergoline alkaloids, such as Lysergic acid amide, which can produce psychedelic effects.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The plant is a rare example of a plant whose hallucinogenic properties were not recognized until recent times. While its cousins in the Convolvulaceae family, such as the Rivea corymbosa (Ololiuhqui) and Ipomoea tricolor (Tlitliltzin), were used in shamanic rituals of Latin America for centuries, the Hawaiian Baby Woodrose was not traditionally recognized as a hallucinogen. Its properties were first brought to attention in the 1960s, despite the fact that the chemical composition of its seeds is nearly identical to those of the two species mentioned above, and the seeds contain the highest concentration of psychoactive compounds in the entire family.</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>In most countries, it is legal to purchase, sell or germinate Argyreia nervosa seeds, but they are generally unapproved for human consumption. Depending on the country, it may be illegal to buy seeds with the intention to consume them, and several countries have outlawed ergine-containing seeds altogether. In Australia, retailers are required to treat their seeds with chemicals to discourage consumption, and it is illegal to buy or possess untreated seeds.</p> <p><strong>Extracted chemicals</strong></p> <p>Extracting ergine from Argyreia speciosa seeds is illegal in the USA since it is a scheduled substance. It is classified as a schedule III depressant by the DEA, although the substance has hallucinogenic/psychedelic properties.</p> <p>Extracts</p> <p>In an animal model of ulcers in rats, large doses of the extract of Argyreia speciosa leaves (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight) showed dose-dependent antiulcer activity and cured the Ulcers.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
T 25 (1g)
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1

Variety from Peru

This plant has giant fruits
Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco

Worlds Largest Giant Corn...

Price €2.25
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Native to Peru and Ecuador Peruvian Giant Corn - also known as Choclo is a hideously large variety of corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The stalks reach up to 5 - 5,50 meters in height, a runt in a litter of this cultivar would tower over standard varieties at a whopping 4 metars.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">In standard varieties of corn the average weight runs from 25 - 35 grams per 100 kernels In Peruvian Giant Corn the weight per 100 kernels runs from 90 - 95 grams per 100 kernels - that's nearly 3 times the size and yield.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">It is a late maturing corn and is estimated to need 120 - 150 days to mature. They are not an easy crop to produce, it requires determination and vigilance to grow.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">One would think being indigenous to the Andes mountainous they would be adapted to windy conditions, but this is not the case. They evolved in the Peruvian Urrabamba Valley and vicinity which is sheltered and has relatively mild weather.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn aka Choclo </span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">They do not withstand strong winds and need persistent staking, at 4 - 5,50 metars in height that's a chore and a half.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The plants produce numerous relatively short cobs with gigundous kernels.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The taste is comparable to standard sweet corn. It is not overly sweet - mild to blandly sweet with a creamy texture would be the best description. Peruvians usually boil them. In Ecuador and Bolivia they dry them first then burst or "pop" them in oil - somewhat like popcorn. We gringos can enjoy them the same as any other corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn Should be planted in blocks as opposed to rows and should not be planted near other varieties of Corn [See - Isolating Sweet Corn.] Cross pollination tends to produce poor tasting starchy corn. Sugar Pearl, as per some suppliers does not need to be isolated as other varieties do - this is just fine for the Sugar Pearl, but not necessarily the other variety.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn can be seeded directly into the soil, or it can also be started indoors and later transplanted. If starting indoors be sure you have a larger than standard container as it could easily outgrow the container before transplant time. Whichever you choose, Plant it in blocks, at least four rows wide, for proper pollination and well-filled ears</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Sowing depth Aprox.: 5 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Germination: 6 to 8 days</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Maturity: at 120 - 150 days.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Color: White - Pale Yellow</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Seed Spacing: 30-35 cm apart.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Row spacing: 100 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">USDA Hardiness Zones: 3- 9</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant Size: 400 - 550 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn cob Size: 17-20 cm Long</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Full Sun</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Above Average Yields per Sq. Footage - Anticipate 3 or more ears per Stalk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn has shallow roots, and uses a lot of nitrogen as well as trace elements. To help your crop get off to the best start possible, prepare the soil first with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer. Well rotted manure or compost is also helpful.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant in the northern side of the garden as corn stalks will deny sunlight to the rest of your garden crops ,you also might want to grow some where it will provide shade to plants that can not tolerate full sunlight.</span></p> <div> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/peruvian-giant-red-sacsa-kuski-corn-seeds.html" target="_blank" title="Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE</strong></a></h2> </div> </body> </html>
P 40 5S NS
Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco

This plant has giant fruits
Giant strawberry seeds

Giant strawberry seeds

Price €2.85
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant strawberry seeds</strong></h2> <h2 style="font-size: 2rem;"><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 100 (0.06g) seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Strawberries, Fragaria ananassa L. Maximus, are quite easy to grow! They are perennial, winter hardy, and will thrive in full sunshine, as long as the soil is fertile and well-drained. Healthy plants will produce an abundance of berries for years! Strawberries are as big as apples! This standard "GIANT" type will provide you with the largest crop! These everbearing Giants will produce throughout the summer for Best desserts and snacks!</p> <p>Strawberries need light to germinate and their seeds shouldn't be covered. But practice has shown that uncovered strawberry seeds dry out very quickly during germination. I, therefore, recommend covering the seed very lightly with sieved seeding soil. After sowing and moistening, you can also place a glass pane on the sowing tray.</p> <p>Seeds need at least 60 days of stratification.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 1 GS (0,06G)
Giant strawberry seeds

Variety from Greece

This plant has giant fruits
Royal Black Greek Fig Seeds...

Royal Black Greek Fig Seeds...

Price €2.15
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Royal Black Greek Fig Seeds - Vasilika Mavra (Βασιλικά Μαύρα)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,02g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Vasilika Mavra or the "Royal Black Greek Fig" is said to be the best tasting of the Greek figs. It is widely grown in Greece. The outside is very dark purple to black and the inside is red.</p> <p>Our experience has been after a couple of years of growing this variety is that Vasilika Mavra produces many very nice dark purple figs that have dropped before they were mature inside. The size, depth of color, and number have grown year over year for us. We hope as the mother trees mature the figs will hold as other varieties have.</p> <p>Those fortunate enough to have tried this fig describe it as berry and honey flavored, thick and jammy.</p> <p>Vasilika Mavra produces super sweet “figs” that continues to the end of the season.</p> <p>Other names: Royal Black Greek Fig, Βασιλικά Μαύρα,</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 19 RBG (0,02g)
Royal Black Greek Fig Seeds - Vasilika Mavra
Cacao Tree Seeds (Theobroma cacao)

Cacao Tree Seeds (Theobroma...

Price €4.00
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Cacao Tree Seeds (Theobroma cacao)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h2> <p><strong>As you can see from our pictures, our cocoa variety is larger than all others.</strong></p> <p>Theobroma cacao also cacao tree and cocoa tree, is a small (4–8 m (13–26 ft) tall) evergreen tree in the family Malvaceae, native to the deep tropical region of America. Its seeds are used to make cocoa powder and chocolate.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Leaves are alternate, entire, unlobed, 10–40 cm (3.9–16 in) long and 5–20 cm (2.0–7.9 in) broad. The flowers are produced in clusters directly on the trunk and older branches; this is known as cauliflory. The flowers are small, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) diameter, with pink calyx. While many of the world's flowers are pollinated by bees (Hymenoptera) or butterflies/moths (Lepidoptera), cacao flowers are pollinated by tiny flies, Forcipomyia midges in the order Diptera.[2] The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, 15–30 cm (5.9–12 in) long and 8–10 cm (3.1–3.9 in) wide, ripening yellow to orange, and weighs about 500 g (1.1 lb) when ripe. The pod contains 20 to 60 seeds, usually called "beans", embedded in a white pulp. The seeds are the main ingredient of chocolate, while the pulp is used in some countries to prepare a refreshing juice. Each seed contains a significant amount of fat (40–50%) as cocoa butter. Their most noted active constituent is theobromine, a compound similar to caffeine.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy and nomenclature</strong></p> <p>Cacao (Theobroma cacao) belongs to the genus Theobroma classified under the subfamily Sterculioidea of the mallow family Malvaceae. Cacao is one of 22 species of Theobroma.</p> <p>The generic name is derived from the Greek for "food of the gods"; from θεος (theos), meaning "god," and βρῶμα (broma), meaning "food".</p> <p>The specific name cacao is derived from the native name of the plant in indigenous Mesoamerican languages. The cacao was known as kakaw in Tzeltal, K’iche’ and Classic Maya; kagaw in Sayula Popoluca; and cacahuatl[dubious – discuss] in Nahuatl.</p> <p>The cupuaçu, Theobroma grandiflorum, is a closely related species also grown in Brazil. Like the cacao, it is also the source for a kind of chocolate known as cupulate or cupuaçu chocolate.</p> <p>The cupuaçu is considered of high potential by the food and cosmetics industries.</p> <p><strong>Distribution and domestication</strong></p> <p>T. cacao is widely distributed from southeastern Mexico to the Amazon basin. There were originally two hypotheses about its domestication; one said that there were two foci for domestication, one in the Lacandon area of Mexico and another in lowland South America. More recent studies of patterns of DNA diversity, however, suggest that this is not the case. Motomayor et al.[4] sampled 1241 trees and classified them into 10 distinct genetic clusters. This study also identified areas, for example around Iquitos in modern Peru, where representatives of several genetic clusters originated. This result suggests that this is where T. cacao was originally domesticated, probably for the pulp that surrounds the beans, which is eaten as a snack and fermented into a mildly alcoholic beverage.[5] Using the DNA sequences obtained by Motomayor et al. and comparing them with data derived from climate models and the known conditions suitable for cacao, Thomas et al. have further refined the view of domestication, linking the area of greatest cacao genetic diversity to a bean-shaped area that encompasses the border between Brazil and Peru and the southern part of the Colombian-Brazilian border.[6] Climate models indicate that at the peak of the last ice age 21,000 years ago, when habitat suitable for cacao was at its most reduced, this area was still suitable, and so provided a refugium for the species. Thomas et al. speculate that from there people took cacao to Mexico, where selection for the beans took place.</p> <p>Cacao trees grow well as understory plants in humid forest ecosystems. This is equally true of abandoned cultivated trees, making it difficult to distinguish truly wild trees from those whose parents may originally have been cultivated.</p> <p><strong>History of cultivation</strong></p> <p>Cultivation, use, and cultural elaboration of cacao were early and extensive in Mesoamerica. Ceramic vessels with residues from the preparation of cacao beverages have been found at archaeological sites dating back to the Early Formative (1900-900 BC) period. For example, one such vessel found at an Olmec archaeological site on the Gulf Coast of Veracruz, Mexico dates cacao's preparation by pre-Olmec peoples as early as 1750 BC. On the Pacific coast of Chiapas, Mexico, a Mokaya archaeological site provides evidence of cacao beverages dating even earlier, to 1900 BC. The initial domestication was probably related to the making of a fermented, thus alcoholic beverage.</p> <p>Several mixtures of cacao are described in ancient texts, for ceremonial or medicinal, as well as culinary, purposes. Some mixtures included maize, chili, vanilla (Vanilla planifolia), and honey. Archaeological evidence for use of cacao, while relatively sparse, has come from the recovery of whole cacao beans at Uaxactun, Guatemala and from the preservation of wood fragments of the cacao tree at Belize sites including Cuello and Pulltrouser Swamp. In addition, analysis of residues from ceramic vessels has found traces of theobromine and caffeine in early formative vessels from Puerto Escondido, Honduras (1100-900 BC) and in middle formative vessels from Colha, Belize (600-400 BC) using similar techniques to those used to extract chocolate residues from four classic period (circa 400 AD) vessels from a tomb at the archaeological site of Rio Azul. As cacao is the only known commodity from Mesoamerica containing both of these alkaloid compounds, it seems likely these vessels were used as containers for cacao drinks. In addition, cacao is named in a hieroglyphic text on one of the Rio Azul vessels. Cacao was also believed to be ground by the Aztecs and mixed with tobacco for smoking purposes</p> <table style="width: 712px;" border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" style="width: 708px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>growing instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Vermehrung:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreatment:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">soak seeds for 2-3 hours in warm water.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">all year</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">See picture 6</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing substrate:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Use high-quality, sterile potting soil</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">+25 - +28°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist, not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 weeks.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Note:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">direct Sow onto bed in May.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing period</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" style="width: 172px;"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width: 534px;"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color: #008000;"> <em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
V 86
Cacao Tree Seeds (Theobroma cacao)

Variety from Turkey

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.
Pistachio Seeds (Pistacia vera) (Antep Pistachio)

Pistachio Seeds (Pistacia...

Price €1.65
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Pistachio Seeds (Pistacia vera) (Antep Pistachio)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5, 20, 50, 100, 500 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Gaziantep, informally called Antep, is a city in southeast Turkey and is among the oldest continually inhabited cities in the world. The Turkish word for pistachio is Antep Fistigi. The Gaziantep area with its fertile soil and arrid climate is the primary growing region for the Antep Pistachio.&nbsp; Many connoisseurs consider this nut to be one of the finest and best tasting nut in the world.</p> <p><strong>NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:</strong></p> <p>Compared to other pistachio varieties including California grown</p> <p>GENUINE GAZIANTEP PISTACHIOS CONTAIN:</p> <p>50% less fat</p> <p>40% less carbohydrates</p> <p>200% more vitamin C</p> <p>70% more iron</p> <p>20% more calcium</p> <p>&nbsp;23% more magnesium</p> <h2>Wikipedia:</h2> <p>The pistachio (/pɪˈstɑːʃiˌoʊ, -ˈstæ-/,[1] Pistacia vera), a member of the cashew family, is a small tree originating from Central Asia and the Middle East.[2] The tree produces seeds that are widely consumed as food.</p> <p>Pistacia vera often is confused with other species in the genus Pistacia that are also known as pistachio. These other species can be distinguished by their geographic distributions (in the wild) and their seeds which are much smaller and have a soft shell.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Archaeology shows that pistachio seeds were a common food as early as 6750 BC.[3] Pliny the Elder writes in his Natural History that pistacia, "well known among us", was one of the trees unique to Syria, and that the seed was introduced into Italy by the Roman Proconsul in Syria, Lucius Vitellius the Elder (in office in 35 AD) and into Hispania at the same time by Flaccus Pompeius.[4] The early sixth-century manuscript De observatione ciborum ("On the observance of foods") by Anthimus implies that pistacia remained well known in Europe in Late Antiquity. Archaeologists have found evidence from excavations at Jarmo in northeastern Iraq for the consumption of Atlantic pistachio.[3] The Hanging Gardens of Babylon were said to have contained pistachio trees during the reign of King Merodach-Baladan about 700 BC.</p> <p>The modern pistachio P. vera was first cultivated in Bronze Age Central Asia, where the earliest example is from Djarkutan, modern Uzbekistan.[5][6] It appears in Dioscurides as pistakia πιστάκια, recognizable as P. vera by its comparison to pine nuts.</p> <p>Additionally, remains of the Atlantic pistachio and pistachio seed along with nut-cracking tools were discovered by archaeologists at the Gesher Benot Ya'aqov site in Israel's Hula Valley, dated to 780,000 years ago.[8] More recently, the pistachio has been cultivated commercially in many parts of the English-speaking world, in Australia, and in New Mexico[9] and California, of the United States, where it was introduced in 1854 as a garden tree.[10] David Fairchild of the United States Department of Agriculture introduced hardier cultivars collected in China to California in 1904 and 1905, but it was not promoted as a commercial crop until 1929.[9][11] Walter T. Swingle’s pistachios from Syria had already fruited well at Niles by 1917.</p> <p>The earliest records of pistachio in English are around roughly year 1400, with the spellings "pistace" and "pistacia". The word pistachio comes from medieval Italian pistacchio, which is from classical Latin pistacium, which is from ancient Greek pistákion and pistákē, which is generally believed to be from Middle Persian, although unattested in Middle Persian. Later in Persian, the word is attested as pesteh. As mentioned, the tree came to the ancient Greeks from Western Asia.</p> <p><strong>Habitat</strong></p> <p>Pistachio is a desert plant, and is highly tolerant of saline soil. It has been reported to grow well when irrigated with water having 3,000–4,000 ppm of soluble salts.[9] Pistachio trees are fairly hardy in the right conditions, and can survive temperatures ranging between −10 °C (14 °F) in winter and 48 °C (118 °F) in summer. They need a sunny position and well-drained soil. Pistachio trees do poorly in conditions of high humidity, and are susceptible to root rot in winter if they get too much water and the soil is not sufficiently free-draining. Long, hot summers are required for proper ripening of the fruit. They have been known to thrive in warm, moist environments.</p> <p>The Jylgyndy Forest Reserve, a preserve protecting the native habitat of Pistacia vera groves, is located in the Nooken District of Jalal-Abad Province of Kyrgyzstan.</p> <p><strong>Characteristics</strong></p> <p>The bush grows up to 10 m (33 ft) tall. It has deciduous pinnate leaves 10–20 centimeters (4–8 inches) long. The plants are dioecious, with separate male and female trees. The flowers are apetalous and unisexual, and borne in panicles.</p> <p>The fruit is a drupe, containing an elongated seed, which is the edible portion. The seed, commonly thought of as a nut, is a culinary nut, not a botanical nut. The fruit has a hard, creamish exterior shell. The seed has a mauvish skin and light green flesh, with a distinctive flavor. When the fruit ripens, the shell changes from green to an autumnal yellow/red, and abruptly splits part way open (see photo). This is known as dehiscence, and happens with an audible pop. The splitting open is a trait that has been selected by humans.[14] Commercial cultivars vary in how consistently they split open.</p> <p>Each pistachio tree averages around 50 kilograms (110 lb) of seeds, or around 50,000, every two years.</p> <p>The shell of the pistachio is naturally a beige color, but it is sometimes dyed red or green in commercial pistachios. Originally, dye was applied by importers to hide stains on the shells caused when the seeds were picked by hand. Most pistachios are now picked by machine and the shells remain unstained, making dyeing unnecessary except to meet ingrained consumer expectations. Roasted pistachio seeds can be artificially turned red if they are marinated prior to roasting in a salt and strawberry marinade, or salt and citrus salts.</p> <p>Like other members of the Anacardiaceae family (which includes poison ivy, sumac, mango, and cashew), pistachios contain urushiol, an irritant that can cause allergic reactions.</p> <p><strong>Production and cultivation</strong></p> <p>Iran, the United States and Turkey are the major producers of pistachios, together accounting for 83% of the world production in 2013 (table).</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>The trees are planted in orchards, and take approximately seven to ten years to reach significant production. Production is alternate-bearing or biennial-bearing, meaning the harvest is heavier in alternate years. Peak production is reached around 20 years. Trees are usually pruned to size to make the harvest easier. One male tree produces enough pollen for eight to 12 drupe-bearing females. Harvesting in the United States and in Greece is often accomplished using equipment to shake the drupes off the tree. After hulling and drying, pistachios are sorted according to open-mouth and closed-mouth shells. Sun-drying has been found to be the best method of drying,[18] then they are roasted or processed by special machines to produce pistachio kernels.</p> <p>Pistachio trees are vulnerable to a wide variety of diseases. Among these is infection by the fungus Botryosphaeria, which causes panicle and shoot blight (symptoms include death of the flowers and young shoots), and can damage entire pistachio orchards.</p> <p>In Greece, the cultivated type of pistachios has an almost-white shell, sweet taste, a red-green kernel and a closed-mouth shell relative to the 'Kerman' variety. Most of the production in Greece comes from the island of Aegina, the region of Thessaly-Almyros and the regional units of West Attica, Corinthia and Phthiotis.</p> <p>In California, almost all female pistachio trees are the cultivar 'Kerman'. A scion from a mature female 'Kerman' is grafted onto a one-year-old rootstock.</p> <p>Bulk container shipments of pistachio kernels are prone to self-heating and spontaneous combustion because of their high fat and low water contents.</p> <p><strong>Consumption</strong></p> <p>The kernels are often eaten whole, either fresh or roasted and salted, and are also used in pistachio ice cream, kulfi, spumoni, historically in Neapolitan ice cream, pistachio butter,[21][22] pistachio paste[23] and confections such as baklava, pistachio chocolate,[24] pistachio halva,[25] pistachio lokum or biscotti and cold cuts such as mortadella. Americans make pistachio salad, which includes fresh pistachios or pistachio pudding, whipped cream, and canned fruit.</p> <p>China is the top pistachio consumer worldwide, with annual consumption of 80,000 tons, while the United States consumes 45,000 tons.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional information</strong></p> <p>Pistachios are a nutritionally dense food. In a 100 gram serving, pistachios provide 562 calories and are a rich source (20% or more of the Daily Value or DV) of protein, dietary fiber, several dietary minerals and the B vitamins, thiamin and especially vitamin B6 at 131% DV (table).[28] Pistachios are a good source (10–19% DV) of calcium, riboflavin, vitamin B5, folate, vitamin E , and vitamin K (table).</p> <p>The fat profile of raw pistachios consists of saturated fats, monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats.[28][29] Saturated fatty acids include palmitic acid (10% of total) and stearic acid (2%).[29] Oleic acid is the most common monounsaturated fatty acid (51% of total fat)[29] and linoleic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, is 31% of total fat.[28] Relative to other tree nuts, pistachios have a lower amount of fat and calories but higher amounts of potassium, vitamin K, γ-tocopherol, and certain phytochemicals such as carotenoids and phytosterols.</p> <p><strong>Research and health effects</strong></p> <p>In July 2003, the United States' Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first qualified health claim specific to seeds lowering the risk of heart disease: "Scientific evidence suggests but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces (42.5 g) per day of most nuts, such as pistachios, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease".[31] Although pistachios contain many calories, epidemiologic studies have provided strong evidence that their consumption is not associated with weight gain or obesity.</p> <p>A 2015 systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials concluded that pistachio consumption in persons without diabetes mellitus appears to modestly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure.[32] Several mechanisms for pistachios' antihypertensive properties have been proposed. These mechanisms include pistachios' high levels of the amino acid arginine (a precursor of the blood vessel dilating compound nitric oxide); high levels of phytosterols and monounsaturated fatty acids; and improvement of endothelial cell function through multiple mechanisms including reductions in circulating levels of oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol and pro-inflammatory chemical signals.</p> <p><strong>Toxin and safety concerns</strong></p> <p>As with other tree seeds, aflatoxin is found in poorly harvested or processed pistachios. Aflatoxins are potent carcinogenic chemicals produced by molds such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The mold contamination may occur from soil, poor storage, and spread by pests. High levels of mold growth typically appear as gray to black filament-like growth. It is unsafe to eat mold-infected and aflatoxin-contaminated pistachios.[33] Aflatoxin contamination is a frequent risk, particularly in warmer and humid environments. Food contaminated with aflatoxins has been found as the cause of frequent outbreaks of acute illnesses in parts of the world. In some cases, such as Kenya, this has led to several deaths.</p> <p>Pistachio shells typically split naturally prior to harvest, with a hull covering the intact seeds. The hull protects the kernel from invasion by molds and insects, but this hull protection can be damaged in the orchard by poor orchard management practices, by birds, or after harvest, which makes it much easier for pistachios to be exposed to contamination. Some pistachios undergo so-called "early split", wherein both the hull and the shell split. Damage or early splits can lead to aflatoxin contamination.[35] In some cases, a harvest may be treated to keep contamination below strict food safety thresholds; in other cases, an entire batch of pistachios must be destroyed because of aflatoxin contamination. In September 1997, the European Union placed its first ban on pistachio imports from Iran due to high levels of aflatoxin. The ban was lifted in December 1997 after Iran introduced and improved food safety inspections and product quality.</p> <p>Pistachio shells may be helpful in cleaning up pollution created by mercury emissions.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
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Pistachio Seeds (Pistacia vera) (Antep Pistachio)