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Water plants seeds

There are 11 products.

Showing 1-11 of 11 item(s)
Sacred Lotus Seeds mixed colors (Nelumbo nucifera) 2.55 - 1

Sacred Lotus Seeds mixed...

Price €3.50 - SKU: F 34
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sacred Lotus Seeds (Nelumbo nucifera)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Nelumbo is a genus of aquatic plants with large, showy flowers resembling the water lily, but not closely related to it. It is commonly called lotus, though this name may be applied to other genera, and there is an unrelated genus Lotus. The generic name is derived from the Sinhalese word Nelum. There are only two known living species in the genus. The sacred lotus (N. nucifera) is native to Asia and is the better known of the two. It is commonly cultivated, and also used in Chinese medicine and cooking. This species is the national flower of Egypt, India and Vietnam. The American lotus (N. lutea) is native to North America and the Caribbean. Horticultural hybrids have been produced between these two geographically separated species. A third, extinct species, N. aureavallis, is known from Eocene fossils from North Dakota, United States.</p> <p><strong>Classification</strong></p> <p>There is residual disagreement over which family the genus should be placed in. Traditional classification systems recognized Nelumbo as part of the Nymphaeaceae (water lily) family, but traditional taxonomists were likely misled by evolutionary convergences associated with an evolutionary shift from a terrestrial to an aquatic lifestyle. In the older classification systems it was recognized under the biological order Nymphaeales or Nelumbonales. Nelumbo is currently recognized as its own family, Nelumbonaceae, one of several distinctive families in the eudicot order Proteales. Its closest living relatives, the (Proteaceae and Platanaceae), are shrubs or trees.</p> <p>The leaves of Nelumbo can be distinguished from those of genera in the Nymphaeaceae as they are peltate, that is they have fully circular leaves. Nymphaea, on the other hand, has a single characteristic notch from the edge in to the center of the lily pad. The seedpod of Nelumbo is very distinctive.</p> <p><strong>Superhydrophobicity</strong></p> <p>The leaves of nelumbo are highly water repellent (superhydrophobic). They have given the name to what is called the lotus effect.</p> <p><strong>Thermoregulation</strong></p> <p>N. nucifera regulates its temperature in order to benefit insects that are needed for it to reproduce. When the plant flowers, it heats its blossoms to above 30 °C (86 °F) for as long as four days even when the air is as cool as 10 °C (50 °F). The heat releases an aroma that attracts certain insects, which fly into the flower to feed on nectar and pollen. According to Roger Seymour and Paul Schultze-Motel of Australia’s University of Adelaide, the heat also rewards insects with a stable environment that enhances their ability to eat, mate, and prepare for flight.</p> <div class="rte"> <h2><span><strong>Video:</strong><br /></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#f80606;"><strong><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkI9-rhumbs" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener"> How To Grow Lotus From Seeds </a></strong></span></h2> </div>
F 34
Sacred Lotus Seeds mixed colors (Nelumbo nucifera) 2.55 - 1
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Watercress Seed - Medicinal plant

Watercress Seed - Medicinal...

Price €2.45 - SKU: MHS 54
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Watercress Seed - Medicinal plant (Nasturtium officinale)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Watercress, with the botanical name Nasturtium officinale, is a rapidly growing, aquatic or semi-aquatic, perennial plant native to Europe and Asia, and one of the oldest known leaf vegetables consumed by humans. It is currently a member of the family Brassicaceae, botanically related to garden cress, mustard, radish and wasabi-all noteworthy for their piquant flavor.</p> <p>The hollow stems of watercress are floating, and the leaves are pinnately compound. Small, white and green flowers are produced in clusters.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>Nasturtium nasturtium-aquaticum (nomenclaturally invalid) and Sisymbrium nasturtium-aquaticum L. are synonyms of N. officinale. Watercress is also listed in some sources as belonging to the genus Rorippa, although molecular evidence shows the aquatic species with hollow stems are more closely related to Cardamine than Rorippa. Despite the Latin name, watercress is not particularly closely related to the flowers popularly known as nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus); T. majus belongs to the family Tropaeolaceae, a sister taxon to the Brassicaceae within the order Brassicales.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Cultivation of watercress is practical on both a large-scale and a garden-scale. Being semi-aquatic, watercress is well-suited to hydroponic cultivation, thriving best in water that is slightly alkaline. It is frequently produced around the headwaters of chalk streams. In many local markets, the demand for hydroponically grown watercress exceeds supply, partly because cress leaves are unsuitable for distribution in dried form, and can only be stored fresh for a short period.</p> <p>Watercress can be sold in supermarkets in sealed plastic bags, containing a little moisture and lightly pressurised to prevent crushing of contents. This has allowed national availability with a once-purchased storage life of one to two days in chilled/refrigerated storage.</p> <p>Also sold as sprouts, the edible shoots are harvested days after germination. If unharvested, watercress can grow to a height of 50–120 centimetres (1.6–3.9 ft). Like many plants in this family, the foliage of watercress becomes bitter when the plants begin producing flowers.</p> <p><strong>Distribution</strong></p> <p>In some regions, watercress is regarded as a weed, in other regions as an aquatic vegetable or herb. Watercress has been grown in many locations around the world.</p> <p>In the United Kingdom, watercress was first commercially cultivated in 1808 by the horticulturist William Bradbery, along the River Ebbsfleet in Kent. Watercress is now grown in a number of counties of the United Kingdom, most notably Hertfordshire, Hampshire, Wiltshire and Dorset. The town of Alresford, near Winchester, holds a Watercress Festival that brings in more than 15,000 visitors every year, and a preserved steam railway line has been named after the local crop. In recent years,[when?] watercress has become more widely available in the UK, at least in the southeast; it is stocked pre-packed in some supermarkets, as well as fresh by the bunch at farmers' markets and greengrocers.</p> <p>In the United States in the 1940s, Huntsville, Alabama, was locally known as the "watercress capital of the world" with Alresford in the U.K. is considered to be that nation's watercress capital.</p> <p><strong>Health benefits</strong></p> <p>Watercress contains significant amounts of iron, calcium, iodine, manganese, and folic acid, in addition to vitamins A, B6, C, and K. Because it is relatively rich in vitamin C, watercress was suggested (among other plants) by English military surgeon John Woodall (1570–1643) as a remedy for scurvy. Watercress is also a significant source of omega-3 fatty acids primarily in the form of 16:3n-3(Hexadecatrienoic acid) at 45 mg/100g.</p> <p>Many benefits from eating watercress are claimed, such as that it acts as a stimulant, a source of phytochemicals and antioxidants, a diuretic, an expectorant, and a digestive aid.[6] It also appears to have antiangiogenic cancer-suppressing properties; it is widely believed to help defend against lung cancer. The content of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) in watercress inhibits HIF, which can inhibit angiogenesis.</p> <p><strong>Side effects</strong></p> <p>Watercress crops grown in the presence of manure can be a haven for parasites such as the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.[11] Watercress is a known inhibitor of the cytochrome P450 CYP2E1, which may result in altered drug metabolism for individuals on certain medications such as chlorzoxazone.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 54
Watercress Seed - Medicinal plant
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Papyrus Sedge, Paper Reed Seeds (Cyperus papyrus)

Papyrus Sedge, Paper Reed...

Price €2.35 - SKU: MHS 71 CP
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Papyrus Sedge, Paper Reed Seeds (Cyperus papyrus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds. </strong></span></h2> <p>Cyperus papyrus (papyrus sedge, paper reed, Indian matting plant, Nile grass) is a species of aquatic flowering plant belonging to the sedge family Cyperaceae. It is a tender herbaceous perennial, native to Africa, and forms tall stands of reed-like swamp vegetation in shallow water.</p> <p>Papyrus sedge (and its close relatives) has a very long history of use by humans, notably by the Ancient Egyptians—it is the source of papyrus paper, one of the first types of paper ever made. Parts of the plant can be eaten, and the highly buoyant stems can be made into boats. It is now often cultivated as an ornamental plant.</p> <p>In nature, it grows in full sun, in flooded swamps, and on lake margins throughout Africa, Madagascar, and the Mediterranean countries.</p> <p>C. papyrus and the dwarf cultivar C. papyrus 'Nanus'[3] have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p>This tall, robust, leafless aquatic plant can grow 4 to 5 m (13 to 16 ft) high. It forms a grass-like clump of triangular green stems that rise up from thick, woody rhizomes. Each stem is topped by a dense cluster of thin, bright green, thread-like stems around 10 to 30 cm (4 to 10 in) in length, resembling a feather duster when the plant is young. Greenish-brown flower clusters eventually appear at the ends of the rays, giving way to brown, nut-like fruits.</p> <p>The younger parts of the rhizome are covered by red-brown, papery, triangular scales, which also cover the base of the culms. Botanically, these represent reduced leaves, so strictly it is not quite correct to call this plant fully "leafless".</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>The papyrus plant is relatively easy to grow from seed, though in Egypt, it is more common to split the rootstock, and grows quite fast once established.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>In Ancient Egypt, papyrus was used for various of purposes such as baskets, sandals, blankets, medicine, incense, and boats. The woody root was used to create bowls and different utensils, and was also burned for fuel. Egyptians made efficient use of the entire plant. Papyrus was an important, "Gift of the Nile" which is still preserved and perpetuated in the Egyptian culture.</p> <p><strong>Papyrus in history</strong></p> <p>Egyptians used the plant (which they called aaru) for many purposes, most famously for making papyrus. Its name in Greek and in English is widely believed to have come from Egyptian. Cyperus papyrus is now used mainly for decoration, as it is nearly extinct in its native habitat in the Nile Delta, where in ancient times it was widely cultivated. Theophrastus' History of Plants (Book iv. 10) states that it grew in Syria, and according to Pliny's Natural History, it was also a native plant of the Niger River and the Euphrates.</p> <p>Aside from papyrus, several other members of the genus Cyperus may also have been involved in the multiple uses Egyptians found for the plant. Its flowering heads were linked to make garlands for the gods in gratitude. The pith of young shoots was eaten both cooked and raw. Its woody root made bowls and other utensils and was burned for fuel. From the stems were made reed boats (seen in bas-reliefs of the Fourth Dynasty showing men cutting papyrus to build a boat; similar boats are still made in southern Sudan), sails, mats, cloth, cordage, and sandals. Theophrastus states that King Antigonus made the rigging of his fleet of papyrus, an old practice illustrated by the ship's cable, wherewith the doors were fastened when Odysseus slew the suitors in his hall (Odyssey xxi. 390).</p> <p>The "rush" or "reed" basket in which the Biblical figure Moses was abandoned may have been made from papyrus.</p> <p>The adventurer Thor Heyerdahl built two boats from papyrus, Ra and Ra II, in an attempt to demonstrate that ancient African or Mediterranean people could have reached America. He succeeded in sailing Ra II from Morocco to Barbados. Fishermen in the Okavango Delta use small sections of the stem as floats for their nets.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>Papyrus can be found in tropical rain forests,[where?] tolerating annual temperatures of 20 to 30 °C (68 to 86 °F) and a pH of 6.0 to 8.5. Papyrus flowers in late summer, and prefers full sun to partly shady conditions. Like most tropical plants, it is sensitive to frost. In the United States, it has become invasive in Florida and has escaped from cultivation in Louisiana, California, and Hawaii.</p> <p>Papyrus sedge forms vast stands in swamps, shallow lakes, and along stream banks throughout the wetter parts of Africa, but it has become rare in the Nile Delta. In deeper waters, it is the chief constituent of the floating, tangled masses of vegetation known as sudd. It also occurs in Madagascar, and some Mediterranean areas such as Sicily and the Levant.</p> <p>The "feather-duster" flowering heads make ideal nesting sites for many social species of birds. As in most sedges, pollination is by wind, not insects, and the mature fruits after release are distributed by water.</p> <p>Papyrus is a C4 sedge that forms highly productive monotypic stands over large areas of wetland in Africa.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;"><span style="color: #fd0000;"><strong>ATTENTION !!! </strong></span></h2> <h2 style="text-align: center;"><span style="color: #fd0000;"><strong>SEEDS ARE VERY SMALL, UNPACKING AT THE WHITE PAPER !!!</strong></span></h2> <p></p> </body> </html>
MHS 71 CP
Papyrus Sedge, Paper Reed Seeds (Cyperus papyrus)
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This plant has giant fruits
Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11

Giant Water Lily Lotus...

Price €2.25 - SKU: F 78
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0606; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Queen of the water lilies, this Amazonian giant has a remarkable life cycle.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica is well known for its huge circular leaves, which are often pictured with a small child sitting supported in the centre as a demonstration of their size and strength. The species is highly prized as an ornamental, despite having somewhat particular requirements for successful cultivation.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica seeds from Thailand that have a perfectly can grow every weather that have a very big size most 3.5 metre. The seeds very fresh easy for grow the most quality 85%. Every seeds had quality cue in with thoroughly.</span></p> <h2><span>How To Grow Victoria amazonica Seeds</span></h2> <p><span>Put the seeds in to washtub and wait 5 weeks.</span></p> <p><span>When the roots thrown out and flowers thrive then after that put the underground and wait for until the lotus grow up.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>WIKIPEDIA:</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Victoria amazonica is a species of flowering plant, the largest of the Nymphaeaceae family of water lilies. It is the National flower of Guyana.</span></p> <p><span>The species has very large leaves, up to 3 m in diameter, that float on the water's surface on a submerged stalk, 7–8 m in length. The species was once called Victoria regia after Queen Victoria, but the name was superseded. V. amazonica is native to the shallow waters of the Amazon River basin, such as oxbow lakes and bayous. It is depicted in the Guyanese coat of arms. The flowers are white the first night they are open and become pink the second night. They are up to 40 cm in diameter, and are pollinated by beetles. This process was described in detail by Sir Ghillean Prance and Jorge Arius.[4][5]It is the largest waterlily in the world.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Classification</span></strong></p> <p><span>A member of the genus Victoria placed in the Nymphaeaceae family or, sometimes, in the Euryalaceae.[6] The first published description of the genus was by John Lindley in October 1837, based on specimens of this plant returned from British Guiana by Robert Schomburgk. Lindley named the genus after the newly ascended Queen Victoria, and the species Victoria regia.[1] The spelling in Schomburgk's description in Athenaeum, published the month before, was given as Victoria Regina.[2] Despite this spelling being adopted by the Botanical Society of London for their new emblem, Lindley's was the version used throughout the nineteenth century.</span></p> <p><span>An earlier account of the species, Euryale amazonica by Eduard Friedrich Poeppig, in 1832 described an affinity with Euryale ferox. A collection and description was also made by the French botanist Aimé Bonpland in 1825.[1][1][8] In 1850 James De Carle Sowerby[9] recognised Poeppig's earlier description and transferred its epithet amazonica. The new name was rejected by Lindley. The current name, Victoria amazonica, did not come into widespread use until the twentieth century.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>Victoria regia, as it was named, was discovered by Tadeáš Haenke in 1801.[10] It was once the subject of rivalry between Victorian gardeners in England. Always on the look out for a spectacular new species with which to impress their peers, Victorian "Gardeners"[11] such as the Duke of Devonshire, and the Duke of Northumberland started a well-mannered competition to become the first to cultivate and bring to flower this enormous lily. In the end, the two aforementioned Dukes became the first to achieve this, Joseph Paxton (for the Duke of Devonshire) being the first in November 1849 by replicating the lily's warm swampy habitat (not easy in winter in England with only coal-fired boilers for heating), and a "Mr Ivison" the second and more constantly successful (for Northumberland) at Syon House.</span></p> <p><span>The species captured the imagination of the public, and was the subject of several dedicated monographs. The botanical illustrations of cultivated specimens in Fitch and W.J. Hooker's 1851 work Victoria Regia[12] received critical acclaim in the Athenaeum, "they are accurate, and they are beautiful".[13] The Duke of Devonshire presented Queen Victoria with one of the first of these flowers, and named it in her honour. The lily, with ribbed undersurface and leaves veining "like transverse girders and supports", was Paxton's inspiration for The Crystal Palace, a building four times the size of St. Peter's in Rome.</span></p> <h2><strong>Video:</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #fc0303;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkI9-rhumbs" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color: #fc0303;">How To Grow Lotus From Seeds </span></a></span><br /></strong></h2> </body> </html>
F 78
Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11
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Brown Aromatic, Jasmine Rice Seeds Heirloom Non-Gmo 1.9 - 1

Brown Aromatic, Jasmine...

Price €1.90 - SKU: P 411 BJ
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Brown Aromatic, Jasmine Rice Seeds Heirloom Non-Gmo</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Jasmine rice (Thai: </span><span>ข้าวหอมมะลิ</span><span>, rtgs: Khao hom mali, Thai pronunciation: [kʰâːw hɔ̌ːm malíʔ]; Chinese: 泰国香米; Tàiguó xiāngmǐ) is a variety of fragrant rice (also known as aromatic rice). Its fragrance, reminiscent of pandan (Pandanus amaryllifolius) and popcorn, results from the rice plant's natural production of aromatic compounds, of which 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline is the most salient. In typical packaging and storage, these aromatic compounds dissipate within a few months. This rapid loss of aromatic intensity leads many Southeast Asians and connoisseurs to prefer each year's freshly harvested "new crop" of jasmine rice.</span></p> <p><span>Jasmine rice is a variety of Oryza sativa. The name "jasmine" refers to the color of the rice, which is as white as the jasmine flower.</span></p> <p><span>Jasmine rice is grown primarily in Thailand (Thai hom mali or Thai fragrant rice), Cambodia (angkor kra'oup or Cambodian jasmine rice), Laos, and southern Vietnam. It is moist and soft in texture when cooked, with a slightly sweet flavor. The grains cling and are somewhat sticky when cooked, though less sticky than glutinous rice (Oryza sativa var. glutinosa), as it has less amylopectin. It is about three times stickier than American long-grain rice.</span></p> <p><span>To harvest jasmine rice, the long stalks are cut and threshed. The rice can then be left in a hulled form called paddy rice, de-hulled to produce brown rice, or milled to remove the germ and some or all of the bran, producing white rice.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Types</span></strong></p> <p><span>Thai jasmine rice and Cambodian rice share many of the same characteristics and grow mainly in neighboring geographic areas on opposite sides of the northeastern Thai-Cambodian border. Cambodian jasmine rice is cultivated in Cambodia and processed as white (milled and polished) and brown rice. Distinct Cambodian jasmine rice varieties include these three, phka rumduol, phka romeat, and phka rumdeng. Recent DNA fingerprint analysis, carried out with 18 markers, shows that all three varieties possess 18 known fragrance alleles. Two varietals (phka rumduol and phka rumdeng) are distinctly Cambodian with 17 markers in identical positions, with Thai jasmine rice and one fragrance marker each in a different position. The analysis of Cambodian phka romeat shows all 18 markers in identical positions with the trademarked Thai jasmine rice Thai hom mali.[8]</span></p> <p><span>Jasmine rice, though grown in Laos and southern Vietnam, is not the predominant rice variety. Glutinous rice is grown in Laos, and regular Oryza sativa predominates in Vietnam.</span></p> <p><span>Thai jasmine rice from Thailand has a slender shape and a jasmine scent.[9]:12-13 The two types of Thai jasmine rice are white and brown.[10] The vast majority of jasmine rice exported overseas to North America and Europe is Thai jasmine rice, with a small minority from Vietnam. In Thailand it is thought that only Surin, Buriram, and Sisaket Provinces can produce high quality hom mali.</span></p> <p><strong><span>White jasmine rice</span></strong></p> <p><span>White jasmine rice is white, has a jasmine flower aroma and, when cooked, a slightly sticky texture.[9]:8-13 The aroma is caused by the evaporation of 2-Acetyl-1-pyrroline.[9]:8-13</span></p> <p><strong><span>Brown jasmine rice</span></strong></p> <p><span>Brown jasmine rice retains the light tan outer layer on the rice grain. It has greater health benefits than white jasmine rice because it still has the bran. Brown jasmine rice has a flavor like oats and contains gamma oryzanol which can decrease cholesterol in blood vessels.[14] Brown jasmine rice has vitamins such as vitamin A, vitamin B, and beta-carotene and it contains antioxidants which support the working of nervous system.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Glycemic index</span></strong></p> <p><span>Jasmine rice has a glycemic index of 68-80.[16] Foods with a glycemic index of 70 or lower are preferred in the diet of diabetics due to their slower absorption which prevents large spikes in blood sugar after consumption. Not all rice has a high glycemic index. Basmati rice, for example, has a relatively low glycemic index of 59. However, it is uncommon for rice to be eaten alone. It is usually eaten with other foods that can reduce its glycemic index by 20-40 percent.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Culinary uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>Steamed jasmine rice is ideal for eating with stir fries, with grilled, fried, or braised food items, and in soups (when cooked slightly drier by adding a little less water during cooking). It often doesn't fare well when used for fried rice, as it is too soft and soggy when still warm. More experienced cooks will use rice that has been cooled down first for making fried rice.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Recognition</span></strong></p> <p><span>At the 2017 World Rice Conference held in Macau, Thailand's hom mali 105 (jasmine) rice was declared the world's best rice, beating 21 competitors.[19] Thailand had entered three rice varieties in the competition. This marks the fifth time in the last nine years that Thai jasmine rice has won the honour.[20] The judges of the competition were chefs from Macau restaurants. Criteria were taste and the shape of the rice grains. Cambodia finished second, Vietnam third.</span></p> </body> </html>
P 411 BJ
Brown Aromatic, Jasmine Rice Seeds Heirloom Non-Gmo 1.9 - 1
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White Water Rose Seeds (Nymphaea alba) 1.95 - 1

White Water Rose Seeds...

Price €1.95 - SKU: MHS 118
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>White Water Rose, </strong><strong>White Water-Lily Seeds (Nymphaea alba)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Nymphaea alba, also known as the European white water lily, white water rose or white nenuphar, is an aquatic flowering plant of the family Nymphaeaceae. It is native to North Africa, temperate Asia, Europe and Tropical Asia (India).</p> <p>It grows in water that is 30–150 cm (12–59 in) deep and likes large ponds and lakes.</p> <p>The leaves can be up to 30 cm (12 in) in diameter and take up a spread of 150 cm (59 in) per plant.[3] The flowers are white and they have many small stamens inside.</p> <p>They are found all over Europe and in parts of North Africa and the Middle East in fresh water.[5] In Africa, it is found in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia. In temperate Asia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Siberia, Iran, Iraq, Israel and Turkey. It is found in tropical Asia, within the Indian provinces of Jammu and Kashmir. Lastly, within Europe, it is found in Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russian Federation, Ukraine Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Switzerland, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Italy, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, France, Portugal and Spain.</p> <p>It contains the active alkaloids nupharine and nymphaeine, and is a sedative and an aphrodisiac/anaphrodisiac depending on sources.[citation needed] Although roots and stalks are used in traditional herbal medicine along with the flower, the petals and other flower parts are the most potent. Alcohol can be used to extract the active alkaloids, and it also boosts the sedative effects. The root of the plant was used by monks and nuns for hundreds of years as an anaphrodisiac, being crushed and mixed with wine. In the earliest printed medical textbooks, authors maintained this use, though warning against consuming large and frequent doses.</p>
MHS 118
White Water Rose Seeds (Nymphaea alba) 1.95 - 1
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Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1

Become our seed supplier

Price €0.00 - SKU:
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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Become our seed supplier</strong></h2> <h2><strong>What does it take to become our seed supplier?</strong></h2> <p>In order to become our supplier, you need to have a video and pictures of the fruits of the plants you offer us, with your personal details and a date on paper that will be clearly visible (with your name and email address you use for PayPal).</p> <p>If it is a vegetable (tomato, pepper, cucumber ...) you need to know the exact name of the variety, because if you use any other name and we cannot find the information on the internet, then we are not interested in those seeds.</p> <p>You will need to send us a smaller amount of seed (20) so that we can perform seed germination testing. After that, we can arrange a further purchase of the seed from you.</p> <p>We make payments exclusively through PayPal (there is no other payment option).</p> </body> </html>
Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1
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Arborio Rice Seeds

Arborio Rice Seeds

Price €1.45 - SKU: VE 101 A (3,6g)
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<h2><strong>Arborio Rice Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 (3,6 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Arborio rice is Italian short-grain rice. It is named after the town of Arborio, in the Po Valley, which is situated in the main region of Piedmont in Italy. Arborio is also grown in Arkansas, California, and Missouri in the United States.</p> <p>When cooked, the rounded grains are firm, and creamy and chewy compared to other rice, due to their higher amylopectin starch content. It has a starchy taste and blends well with other flavors.</p> <p>Arborio rice is often used to make risotto; other suitable varieties include Carnaroli, Maratelli, Baldo, and Vialone Nano. Arborio rice is also usually used for rice pudding.</p> <p>Arborio is a cultivar of the Japonica group of varieties of Oryza sativa.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 101 A (3,6g)
Arborio Rice Seeds
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Black Rice Royal Pearl Seeds

Black Rice Royal Pearl Seeds

Price €1.95 - SKU: VE 108 BR (1g)
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<h2><strong>Black Rice Royal Pearl Seeds</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Royal Pearl Rice is an aromatic rice with a nutty aroma. The delectable taste and smell of this rice is perfect for all types of dishes especially Asian and Thai cuisine.</span></p> <p><span>Oryza sativa, commonly known as Asian rice, is the plant species most commonly referred to in English as rice. Oryza sativa is a grass with a genome consisting of 430Mb across 12 chromosomes. It is renowned for being easy to genetically modify, and is a model organism for cereal biology.</span></p> <p><span>Debates on the origins of the domesticated rice are numerous. In 2011, genetic evidence showed that all forms of Asian rice, both indica and japonica, sprang from a single domestication that occurred 8,200–13,500 years ago in China of the wild rice Oryza rufipogon.[5] A 2012 study, through a map of rice genome variation, indicated that the domestication of rice occurred in the Pearl River valley region of China. From East Asia, rice was spread to South and Southeast Asia.[6] Before this research, the commonly accepted view, based on archaeological evidence, is that rice was first domesticated in the region of the Yangtze River valley in China.</span></p> <p><span>The precise date of the first domestication is unknown, but depending on the molecular clock estimate, the date is estimated to be 8,200 to 13,500 years ago. This is consistent with known archaeological data on the subject.</span></p> <p><span>An older theory, based on one chloroplast and two nuclear gene regions, Londo et al. (2006) had proposed that O. sativa rice was domesticated at least twice—indica in eastern India, Myanmar, and Thailand; and japonica in southern China and Vietnam—though they concede that archaeological and genetic evidence exist for a single domestication of rice in the lowlands of China.</span></p> <p><span>Because the functional allele for nonshattering, the critical indicator of domestication in grains, as well as five other single-nucleotide polymorphisms, is identical in both indica and japonica, Vaughan et al. (2008) determined a single domestication event for O. sativa happened in the region of the Yangtze River valley.</span></p> <p><span>In 2003, Korean archaeologists alleged they discovered burnt grains of domesticated rice in Soro-ri, Korea, which dated to 13,000 BC. These antedate the oldest grains in China, which were dated to 10,000 BC, and potentially challenge the mainstream explanation that domesticated rice originated in China. The findings were received by academia with strong skepticism.</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 108 BR (1g)
Black Rice Royal Pearl Seeds
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Rakthashali Red Rice Seeds

Rakthashali Red Rice Seeds

Price €1.95 - SKU: VE 103 RR (3,6g)
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<h2><strong>Rakthashali Red Rice Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 (3,6 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Rakthashali, a rare rice variety. One of the rarest red rice varieties with high medicinal value and believed to be extinct in this part of the world. Rakthashali, also called Red Sali, Chennellu, Raktasali is widely mentioned in Puranas and ancient texts of Ayurveda as having properties potent enough to cure many ailments. Ayurveda says this variety of rice, dating its use back to more than 3,000 years, is good for the Tridoshas, such as Vatha, Pitha, and Kafa.</p> <p>Rakthashali was a rice variety with the most nutrient and herbal value. Its herbal properties are yet to be documented properly. It is one of the rarest rice varieties. The unavailability of Rakthashali rice has made Ayurveda practitioners to prescribe Njavara rice variety for various ailments. There are sections of people who falsely propagate Njavara as having the properties of Rakthashali.</p> <p>Ayurveda considered red rice (rakta shali) the best among the other rice varieties, due to desirable property as they had the power to redress the imbalance in the tridosha or humours whose imbalance in the body causes various types of diseases. In recent times, interest in red rice has been revived because of the presence of antioxidants. The antioxidant and scavenging activity of red rice is higher than that of white rice.</p> <p>There are many myths about the origin of Rakthashali in different cultures, including Japanese, Chinese, Korean, and Indian. But the myths apart, history says Rakthashali was the most preferred rice of yesteryear kings and aristocrats.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Varieties">Varieties</span></h2> <p>Varieties of red rice include:</p> <ul> <li><i>Oryza longistaminata</i>, also known as red rice</li> <li><i>Oryza punctata</i>, also known as red rice</li> <li>Red rice, also known as<span>&nbsp;</span>weedy rice, a low-yielding rice variety that persists as a weed in fields of better-quality rice</li> <li>Rakthashali, a rare rice variety</li> <li>Thai<span>&nbsp;</span>Red Cargo rice, a non-glutinous long-grain rice variety</li> <li>Bhutanese red rice, medium-grain rice grown in the Kingdom of Bhutan in the eastern Himalayas</li> <li>Camargue red rice, a relatively new variety of rice cultivated in the wetlands of the Camargue region of southern France</li> <li>Matta rice<span>&nbsp;</span>Kerala Matta rice, also known as Rosematta rice, Palakkadan Matta rice, Kerala Red rice, and Red parboiled rice, is an indigenous variety of rice grown in Palakkad District of Kerala. It is popular in Kerala and Sri Lanka, where it is used for<span>&nbsp;</span>idlies<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>appams, and eaten plain.</li> <li>Ulikan or mini-angan, heirloom red rice from<span>&nbsp;</span>Ifugao<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Kalinga,<span>&nbsp;</span>Philippines</li> <li>Arroz da terra, an heirloom red rice cultivated in Northeastern<span>&nbsp;</span>Brazil<span>&nbsp;</span>(States of<span>&nbsp;</span>Rio Grande do Norte<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>Paraíba) since the 16th century.</li> </ul> <p>Dishes<br>Red Rice, a traditional Gullah Lowcountry dish, similar to West African jollof rice.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 103 RR (3,6g)
Rakthashali Red Rice Seeds
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Rice Seeds (Mix Colors...

Rice Seeds (Mix Colors...

Price €1.95 - SKU: VE 102 IR (3,6g)
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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Rice Seeds (Mix Colors Integral)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 (3,6 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This pack contains several varieties of different color integral rice (see picture).</p> <p>Integral rice is a whole grain and a good source of magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, thiamine, niacin, vitamin B6, and manganese, and is high in fiber. White rice, unlike brown rice, has the bran and germ removed, and therefore has different nutritional content.</p> <p>It has been found that germinated grains, in general, have nutritional advantages. Germinated brown rice (GBR), developed during the International Year of Rice, is brown rice that has been soaked for 4–20 hours in warm 40 °C (104 °F) water before cooking. This stimulates germination, which activates various enzymes in the rice, giving rise to a more complete amino acid profile, including GABA. Cooked brown rice tends to be chewy; cooked GBR is softer, and preferred particularly by children.</p> <p>Integral rice generally needs longer cooking times than white rice, unless it is broken. Studies by Gujral and Kumar in 2003 estimated a cooking time between 35 and 51 minutes.</p> </body> </html>
VE 102 IR (3,6g)
Rice Seeds (Mix Colors Integral)
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