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Variety from Serbia
"Vezanka" Chili 500 Seeds Old Serbian variety

"Vezanka" Chili 4000 Seeds...

Price €120.00 - SKU: C 57
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>"Vezanka" Chili 4000 Seeds Old Serbian variety</strong></em></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 4000 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div><span>Vezena peppers are medium to large in size and are long, slender, and taper to a point at the non-stem end, averaging one centimeter in diameter near the stem cap and 15-30 centimeters in length. The pods have prominent, horizontal tan lines, also known as corking, and these lines create a leathery texture. The skin matures from green to red and is very thin, moist, and slightly chewy. Inside the pod, there is a hollow seed cavity housing many round, pale white to cream-colored seeds that are slippery, firm, and crunchy. Vezena peppers have a mild to medium heat, are very aromatic, and are initially sweet with a nutty finish. </span> <h2>CURRENT FACTS</h2> <span>Vezena peppers, botanically classified as Capsicum annuum, are a rare heirloom variety native to Eastern Europe that grows on small plants reaching just under one meter in height. Also known as the Rezha Macedonian pepper, Vezeni Piperki, Vezenka, Vezanka, and Vezhenka, the name Vezena Piperka often translates to “engraved” or “embroidered,” a descriptor used to identify the pepper’s unique corked skin. Vezena peppers vary considerably in heat and average between 1,200-5,000 units on the Scoville Heat Scale, with some peppers carrying less capsaicin having a milder taste and some peppers carrying stronger heat similar to a jalapeno. Vezena peppers are commonly used as decoration and are also dried and ground for use in spices such as paprika. </span><br /><h2>NUTRITIONAL VALUE</h2> <span>Vezena peppers contain vitamins C, A, K, and B6, potassium, manganese, iron, magnesium, copper, and fiber. </span><br /><h2>APPLICATIONS</h2> <span>Vezena peppers are best suited for both raw and cooked applications such as grilling and roasting. They can be chopped, diced, and incorporated into salsas or they can be roasted or boiled and used in marmalades and spreads. Vezena peppers are also commonly dried and hung for extended use or ground into paprika and chile salt. They can also be pickled or smoked for an added flavor. Vezena peppers pair well with savory foods, omelets, onion, garlic, sour cream, yogurt, meats such as poultry, pork, beef, and fish, creamy sauces, rice, potatoes, goulash, and boiled or steamed vegetables. They will keep up to one week when stored in a paper bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. Vezena peppers have extremely thin skin and will dry out quickly if left in a dry, warm environment. </span><br /><h2>ETHNIC/CULTURAL INFO</h2> <span>In Serbia, Vezena peppers are often hung in large clusters around homes and are dried naturally in the autumn sun. The peppers are then left as decoration or are used for grinding into spices and powders. Vezena peppers have been grown in Serbia for hundreds of years, and the Serbian farmers search for the fruits with the most corking striations and collect the seeds as these peppers are considered the most valuable to grow. </span><br /><h2>GEOGRAPHY/HISTORY</h2> <span>Vezena peppers are native to Eastern Europe, specifically to Serbia. The exact origins are unknown, but these peppers are believed to have been cultivated for hundreds of years and are also found in Albania, Yugoslavia, and other select areas in the Balkan region.</span></div> </div>
C 57
"Vezanka" Chili 500 Seeds Old Serbian variety

Variety from Serbia
"Vezanka" Chili 500 Seeds Old Serbian variety

"Vezanka" Chili 500 Seeds...

Price €75.00 - SKU: C 57
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>"Vezanka" Chili 500 Seeds Old Serbian variety</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 500 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span><strong>Vezanka, Vezena </strong>peppers are medium to large in size and are long, slender, and taper to a point at the non-stem end, averaging one centimeter in diameter near the stem cap and 15-30 centimeters in length. The pods have prominent, horizontal tan lines, also known as corking, and these lines create a leathery texture. The skin matures from green to red and is very thin, moist, and slightly chewy. Inside the pod, there is a hollow seed cavity housing many round, pale white to cream-colored seeds that are slippery, firm, and crunchy. Vezena peppers have a mild to medium heat, are very aromatic, and are initially sweet with a nutty finish. </span></p> <h2>Current Facts</h2> <p><span>Vezena peppers, botanically classified as Capsicum annuum, are a rare heirloom variety native to Eastern Europe that grows on small plants reaching just under one meter in height. Also known as the Rezha Macedonian pepper, Vezeni Piperki, Vezenka, Vezanka, and Vezhenka, the name Vezena Piperka often translates to “engraved” or “embroidered,” a descriptor used to identify the pepper’s unique corked skin. Vezena peppers vary considerably in heat and average between 1,200-5,000 units on the Scoville Heat Scale, with some peppers carrying less capsaicin having a milder taste and some peppers carrying stronger heat similar to a jalapeno. Vezena peppers are commonly used as decoration and are also dried and ground for use in spices such as paprika. </span></p> <h2>Nutritional Value</h2> <p><span>Vezena peppers contain vitamins C, A, K, and B6, potassium, manganese, iron, magnesium, copper, and fiber. </span></p> <h2>Applications</h2> <p><span>Vezena peppers are best suited for both raw and cooked applications such as grilling and roasting. They can be chopped, diced, and incorporated into salsas or they can be roasted or boiled and used in marmalades and spreads. Vezena peppers are also commonly dried and hung for extended use or ground into paprika and chile salt. They can also be pickled or smoked for an added flavor. Vezena peppers pair well with savory foods, omelets, onion, garlic, sour cream, yogurt, meats such as poultry, pork, beef, and fish, creamy sauces, rice, potatoes, goulash, and boiled or steamed vegetables. They will keep up to one week when stored in a paper bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. Vezena peppers have extremely thin skin and will dry out quickly if left in a dry, warm environment. </span></p> <h2>Ethnic/Cultural Info</h2> <p><span>In Serbia, Vezena peppers are often hung in large clusters around homes and are dried naturally in the autumn sun. The peppers are then left as decoration or are used for grinding into spices and powders. Vezena peppers have been grown in Serbia for hundreds of years, and the Serbian farmers search for the fruits with the most corking striations and collect the seeds as these peppers are considered the most valuable to grow. </span></p> <h2>Geography/History</h2> <p><span>Vezena peppers are native to Eastern Europe, specifically to Serbia. The exact origins are unknown, but these peppers are believed to have been cultivated for hundreds of years and are also found in Albania, Yugoslavia, and other select areas in the Balkan region.</span></p>
C 57
"Vezanka" Chili 500 Seeds Old Serbian variety
Carolina Reaper Seeds Red or Yellow Worlds Hottest 2.45 - 1

100 Seeds Carolina Reaper

Price €5.50 - SKU: C 97
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>100 Seeds Carolina Reaper</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 (0,47g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>As you can see yourself from our photos, that the seeds are from our own plants (organically grown) and you know what you will get from the seeds you buy from us... </strong></p> <p>The Carolina Reaper, originally named the HP22BNH7, is a cultivar of chili pepper of the Capsicum chinense species. Bred in the Rock Hill, South Carolina greenhouse by Ed Currie, who runs the PuckerButt Pepper Company in Fort Mill, South Carolina, it has been rated as the world's hottest chili pepper by Guinness World Records since August 7, 2013. The original crossbreed was between a ghost pepper (a former world record holder) and a red habanero. The official Guinness World Record heat level is 1,569,300 Scoville Heat Units (SHU), according to tests conducted by Winthrop University in South Carolina.</p> <p>At the second Annual New York City Hot Sauce Expo on 30 March 2014, Ed Currie was presented with his world record by Guinness World Records and an eating competition was held in which the fastest time to consume three Carolina Reapers was determined for a new Guinness World Records at 12.23 seconds by Russel Todd. This record was beaten in September 2014 by Jason McNabb, who finished three peppers in 10.95 seconds.</p> </body> </html>
C 97 R 100S
Carolina Reaper Seeds Red or Yellow Worlds Hottest 2.45 - 1
  • New
100 Seeds Habanero Red 5.45 - 3

100 Seeds Habanero Red

Price €5.45 - SKU: C 19
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5/ 5
<h2>100 Seeds Habanero Red (Capsicum chinense)</h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 100 seeds.</span></h2> <div>The habanero is a variety of chili pepper. Unripe habaneros are green, and they color as they mature. The most common color variants are orange and red, but the fruit may also be white, brown, yellow, green, or purple. Typically, a ripe habanero chili is 2–6 cm (0.8–2.4 in) long. Habanero chilis are very hot, rated 100,000–650,000 on the Scoville scale. The habanero's heat, its flavor, and its floral aroma have made it a popular ingredient in hot sauces and spicy foods.<br /><br />The name indicates something or someone from La Habana (Havana). In English, it is sometimes spelled and pronounced habañero, the tilde being added as a hyperforeignism patterned after jalapeño.<br /><br /><strong>Origin and current use</strong><br />The habanero chili comes from the Amazon, from which it was spread, reaching Mexico. A specimen of a domesticated habanero plant, dated at 8,500 years old, was found at an archaeological site in Peru.[citation needed] An intact fruit of a small domesticated habanero, found in pre-ceramic levels in Guitarrero Cave in the Peruvian highlands, was dated to 6500 BC.<br /><br />The habanero chili was disseminated by Spanish colonists to other areas of the world, to the point that 18th-century taxonomists mistook China for its place of origin and called it Capsicum chinense ("the Chinese pepper").<br /><br />Today, the largest producer is the Yucatán Peninsula, in Mexico. Habaneros are an integral part of Yucatecan food, accompanying most dishes, either in natural form or purée or salsa. Other modern producers include Belize, Panama, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, and parts of the United States, including Texas, Idaho, and California.<br /><br />The Scotch bonnet is often compared to the habanero, since they are two varieties of the same species, but they have different pod types. Both the Scotch bonnet and the habanero have thin, waxy flesh. They have a similar heat level and flavor. Both varieties average around the same level of pungency, but the actual degree varies greatly from one fruit to another according to genetics, growing methods, climate, and plant stress.<br /><br />In 1999, the habanero was listed by Guinness World Records as the world's hottest chili, but it has since been displaced by other peppers. The Bhut jolokia (or ghost pepper) and Trinidad moruga scorpion have since been identified as native Capsicum chinense subspecies even hotter than the habanero. Breeders constantly crossbreed subspecies to attempt to create cultivars that will break the record on the Scoville scale. One example is the Carolina Reaper, a cross between a Bhut jolokia pepper with a particularly pungent red habanero.<br /><br /><strong>Cultivation</strong><br />Habaneros thrive in hot weather. Like all peppers, the habanero does well in an area with good morning sun and in soil with a pH level around 5 to 6 (slightly acidic). Habaneros which are watered daily produce more vegetative growth but the same number of fruit, with lower concentrations of capsaicin, as compared to plants which are watered only when dry (every seven days). Overly moist soil and roots will produce bitter-tasting peppers. Daily watering during flowering and early setting of fruit helps prevent flower and immature fruit from dropping, but flower dropping rates are reported to often reach 90% even in ideal conditions.<br /><br />The habanero is a perennial flowering plant, meaning that with proper care and growing conditions, it can produce flowers (and thus fruit) for many years. Habanero bushes are good candidates for a container garden. In temperate climates, though, it is treated as an annual, dying each winter and being replaced the next spring. In tropical and subtropical regions, the habanero, like other chiles, will produce year round. As long as conditions are favorable, the plant will set fruit continuously.<br /><br /><strong>Cultivars</strong><br />Several growers have attempted to selectively breed habanero plants to produce hotter, heavier, and larger peppers. Most habaneros rate between 200,000 and 300,000 on the Scoville scale. In 2004, researchers in Texas created a mild version of the habanero, but retained the traditional aroma and flavor. The milder version was obtained by crossing the Yucatán habanero pepper with a heatless habanero from Bolivia over several generations.</div> <div></div> <div>Black habanero is an alternative name often used to describe the dark brown variety of habanero chilis (although they are slightly different, being slightly smaller and slightly more sphere-shaped). Some seeds have been found which are thought to be over 7,000 years old. The black habanero has an exotic and unusual taste, and is hotter than a regular habanero with a rating between 400,000 and 450,000 Scoville units. Small slivers used in cooking can have a dramatic effect on the overall dish. Black habaneros take considerably longer to grow than other habanero chili varieties. In a dried form, they can be preserved for long periods of time, and can be reconstituted in water then added to sauce mixes. Previously known as habanero negro, or by their Nahuatl name, their name was translated into English by spice traders in the 19th century as "black habanero". The word "chocolate" was derived from the Nahuatl word, xocolātl [ʃoˈkolaːt͡ɬ], and was used in the description, as well (as "chocolate habanero"), but it proved to be unpronounceable to the British traders, so it was simply named "black habanero".<br /><br />A 'Caribbean Red,' a cultivar within the habanero family, has a citrusy and slightly smoky flavor, with a Scoville rating ranging from 300,000 to 445,000 Scoville units.</div>
C 19
100 Seeds Habanero Red 5.45 - 3
  • Online only
100 Seeds Yellow Fleshed Watermelon Moon and Stars 10 - 6

100 Seeds Yellow Fleshed...

Price €10.00 - SKU: V 40
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>100 Seeds Yellow Fleshed Watermelon Moon and Stars</strong></h2> <h2><strong style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of<strong> 100&nbsp;(10g)&nbsp;seeds.</strong></strong></h2> <p>USDA Certified Organic. 90 days. Early 1900s GA family heirloom. Introduced 1987 by SESE. Years ago, a melon of this description was routinely shipped from Bermuda to some Southern states around Christmas time. Good flavor, the sweetest Moon and Stars variety. 15-35 lb fruits. Has some tolerance to disease and drought. Rinds has many small yellow stars and some moons. To serve, try halving melons and scooping out the insides using a melon ball scoop. Scallop the edges and fill with melon balls of red and yellow watermelon, muskmelon, and assorted fruit.&nbsp;</p> <table width="0" class="responsive-table" style="height: 732px; border-style: solid; width: 0px; border-color: #066b0f; float: left;"> <tbody> <tr style="height: 58px;"> <td colspan="2" style="width: 755px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 58px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;">Damage the membranes of the seed.&nbsp;But not the&nbsp;sprouts!&nbsp;See Picture</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 58px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 58px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 58px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;">0,5-1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 58px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 76px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 76px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 76px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;">20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 58px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 76px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 76px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 76px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;">1-6 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 58px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height: 58px;"> <td style="width: 207px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td style="width: 542px; height: 58px; border-style: solid; border-color: #0b7014;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 11pt; color: #000000;"><strong><em>Copyright © 2012</em></strong> <strong><em>Seeds Gallery - All Rights Reserved.</em></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table>
V 40 (10g)
100 Seeds Yellow Fleshed Watermelon Moon and Stars 10 - 6
100 Seeds Yellow Watermelon JANOSIK  - 1

100 Seeds Yellow Watermelon...

Price €10.00 - SKU: P 248
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Yellow Watermelon JANOSIK 100 Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A very unusual and highly prized Polish melon variety is delicious and different. Yellow Watermelon ‘Janosik’ is the first true Polish watermelon variety whose flesh is yellow. This species grows well in temperate climates and produces large fruit, they grow 3.5 to 5.5 kilograms in weight. The rind of each fruit is dark green. Yellow Watermelon ‘Janosik’ has juicy and very sweet flesh with a relatively small amount of seeds</p> </body> </html>
P 248 100 S
100 Seeds Yellow Watermelon JANOSIK  - 1
Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia melanocarpa) 2.25 - 1

1000 Seeds Chokeberry...

Price €15.00 - SKU: V 29 1000S
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>1000 Seeds Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1000 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Aronia melanocarpa is an extraordinary medicine plant that has been developed in Poland. It has an incredible array of health qualities. Known as Chokeberry, the native Americans used it to prepare pemmican (dried meat). It has a higher concentration of vitamin C than blackcurrants, but it also contains a host of other valuable substances, especially antioxidants, polyphenols, bioflavonoids, and tannins. It is a very hardy and vigorous plant and can survive most conditions.</p> <h3><strong>Wikipedia</strong>:</h3> <p><i><b>Aronia</b></i><span> </span>is a genus of<span> </span>deciduous<span> </span>shrubs, the<span> </span><b>chokeberries</b>, in the family<span> </span>Rosaceae<span> </span>native to eastern North America and most commonly found in wet woods and swamps.<span> </span>The genus is usually considered to contain two or three<span> </span>species, one of which is<span> </span>naturalized<span> </span>in Europe.</p> <p>Chokeberries are cultivated as<span> </span>ornamental plants<span> </span>and as<span> </span>food products. The sour berries, or<span> </span><b>Aronia berries</b>, can be eaten raw off the bush, but are more frequently processed. They can be found in wine, jam, syrup, juice, soft spreads, tea, salsa,<span> </span>chili starters, extracts, beer, ice cream,<span> </span>gummies,<span> </span>and<span> </span>tinctures.<span> </span>The name "chokeberry" comes from the<span> </span>astringency<span> </span>of the fruits, which creates the sensation of making one's mouth pucker.</p> <p><i>Chokeberries</i><span> </span>are often mistakenly called<span> </span><i>chokecherries</i>, the<span> </span>common name<span> </span>for<span> </span><i>Prunus virginiana</i>. Further adding to the ambiguity, a<span> </span>variety<span> </span>of<span> </span><i>Prunus virginiana</i><span> </span>is<span> </span><i>melanocarpa</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup><span> </span>and readily confused with<span> </span><i>black chokeberry</i><span> </span>because it is commonly referred to as "black chokeberry" or "aronia". Aronia berries and chokecherries both contain<span> </span>polyphenolic<span> </span>compounds, such as<span> </span>anthocyanins, yet the two plants are distantly related within the family Rosaceae.</p> <p>The<span> </span>leaves<span> </span>are alternate, simple, and<span> </span>oblanceolate<span> </span>with<span> </span>crenate<span> </span>margins and<span> </span>pinnate<span> </span>venation; in autumn the leaves turn a bold red color. Dark<span> </span>trichomes<span> </span>are present on the upper midrib surface. The<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>are small, with 5<span> </span>petals<span> </span>and 5<span> </span>sepals, and produced in<span> </span>corymbs<span> </span>of 10–25 together.<span> </span>Hypanthium<span> </span>is urn-shaped. The fruit is a small<span> </span>pome, with an<span> </span>astringent<span> </span>flavor.</p> <p><i>Aronia</i><span> </span>has been thought to be closely related to<span> </span><i>Photinia</i>, and has been included in that genus in some classifications,<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup><span> </span>but botanist Cornelis Kalkman observed that a combined genus should be under the older name<span> </span><i>Aronia</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-Kalkman_11-0" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span>The combined genus contains about 65 species.<sup id="cite_ref-weakley_12-0" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>In 2004, Kalkman expressed doubt about the<span> </span>monophyly<span> </span>of the combined group, and new molecular studies confirm this.<sup id="cite_ref-Potter_13-0" class="reference">[13]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Campbell_14-0" class="reference">[14]</sup><span> </span>They do not place these two genera together or even near one another.</p> <p>In eastern North America are two well-known species, named after their fruit color, red chokeberry and black chokeberry, plus a purple chokeberry whose origin is a natural hybrid of the two.<sup id="cite_ref-weakley_12-1" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>A fourth species,<span> </span><i>Aronia mitschurinii</i>, that apparently originated in cultivation, is also known as<span> </span><i>Sorbaronia mitschurinii</i>.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p>Aronia is considered cold hardy and heat tolerant in<span> </span>USDA<span> </span>Zones 3 to 8.<sup id="cite_ref-usda_17-0" class="reference">[17]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup><span> </span>Aronia plants grow well both in<span> </span>orchard-type rows or set as<span> </span>landscape<span> </span>elements, including several varieties in 3 to 12 foot heights.<sup id="cite_ref-usda_17-1" class="reference">[17]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Products_and_uses">Products and uses</span></h3> <p>The chokeberries are attractive<span> </span>ornamental plants<span> </span>for gardens. They are naturally understory and woodland edge plants, and grow well when planted under<span> </span>trees. Chokeberries are resistant to drought, insects, pollution, and disease. A number of<span> </span>cultivars, including<span> </span><i>A. arbutifolia</i><span> </span>'Brilliant' and<span> </span><i>A. melanocarpa</i><span> </span>'Autumn magic', have been selected for their striking fall leaf color.</p> <p>An aronia wine is made in<span> </span>Lithuania. In<span> </span>Poland, aronia berries are added to jams and juices or dried to make a herbal<span> </span>tea<span> </span>sometimes blended with other ingredients, such as<span> </span>blackcurrant.<sup id="cite_ref-mckay_19-0" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>In<span> </span>Bosnia and Herzegovina, the berries are sold fresh and frozen or made into juices, jams and teas.<sup id="cite_ref-Fresh_Fruit_Portal_20-0" class="reference">[20]</sup><span> </span>Aronia is also used as a<span> </span>flavoring<span> </span>or<span> </span>colorant<span> </span>for beverages or yogurts.<sup id="cite_ref-mckay_19-1" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>Juice from the ripe berries is<span> </span>astringent, semi-sweet (moderate sugar content), sour (low<span> </span>pH), and contains a low level of<span> </span>vitamin C.<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup><span> </span>The berries have a tart<span> </span>flavor<span> </span>and, in addition to juice, can be baked into breads.<sup id="cite_ref-mckay_19-2" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>In the United States and Canada, aronia<span> </span>juice concentrate<span> </span>is used in manufactured juice blends.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Polyphenol_content">Polyphenol content</span></h3> <p><i>Aronia melanocarpa</i><span> </span>(black chokeberry) has attracted scientific interest due to its deep purple, almost black<span> </span>pigmentation<span> </span>that arises from dense contents of<span> </span>polyphenols, especially<span> </span>anthocyanins. Total polyphenol content is 1752 mg per 100 g dry weight,<sup id="cite_ref-Phenol-Explorer_22-0" class="reference">[22]</sup><span> </span>anthocyanin content is 1480 mg per 100 g dry weight, and<span> </span>proanthocyanidin<span> </span>concentration is 664 mg per 100 g fresh weight.<sup id="cite_ref-Wu_23-0" class="reference">[23]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-24" class="reference">[24]</sup><span> </span>These values are among the highest measured in plants to date. The black aronia species contains higher levels of anthocyanins than purple (<i>Aronia prunifolia</i>) or red aronia (<i>Aronia arbutifolia</i>), whereas red and purple aronia are richer in phenolic acid and proanthocyanins.<sup id="cite_ref-pmid23941506_25-0" class="reference">[25]</sup></p> <p>The plant produces these pigments mainly in the leaves and skin of the berries to protect the pulp and seeds from constant exposure to<span> </span>ultraviolet radiation<span> </span>and production of<span> </span>free radicals.<sup id="cite_ref-simon_26-0" class="reference">[26]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-27" class="reference">[27]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-28" class="reference">[28]</sup><span> </span>By absorbing<span> </span>UV<span> </span>rays in the<span> </span>blue-purple spectrum, leaf and skin pigments filter intense sunlight, serve antioxidant functions and thereby have a role assuring regeneration of the species. Brightly colorful pigmentation also attracts birds and other animals to consume the fruit and disperse the seeds in their droppings.<sup id="cite_ref-simon_26-1" class="reference">[26]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-29" class="reference">[29]</sup></p> <p>Analysis of polyphenols in chokeberries has identified the following individual chemicals (among hundreds known to exist in the plant kingdom):<span> </span>cyanidin-3-galactoside, cyanidin-3-arabinoside,<span> </span>quercetin-3-glycoside,<span> </span>epicatechin,<span> </span>caffeic acid,<span> </span>delphinidin,<span> </span>petunidin,<span> </span>pelargonidin,<span> </span>peonidin, and<span> </span>malvidin.<sup id="cite_ref-Wu_23-1" class="reference">[23]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-pmid23941506_25-1" class="reference">[25]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-30" class="reference">[30]</sup><span> </span>All these except caffeic acid are members of the<span> </span>flavonoid<span> </span>category of phenolics.</p> <p>For reference to phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and similar plant-derived phytochemicals,<sup id="cite_ref-Phenol-Explorer_22-1" class="reference">[22]</sup><span> </span>Wikipedia has a<span> </span>list of phytochemicals and foods in which they are prominent.</p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in water for 8- 12 hours </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <div> <div style="text-align: center;">Genus: Aronia</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Species: melanocarpa</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Common Name: Black Chokeberry</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Other Name: Chokeberry, Gueles Noires</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Pre-treatment: required</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Zone Hardiness Cold: 3</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Zone Hardiness warm: 8</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Plant Type: Small Shrub</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Growth rate: medium</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Vegetation type: deciduous</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Leaf /Flower color: Green/White</div> </div> </body> </html>
V 29 4g
Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia melanocarpa) 2.25 - 1

Variety from Italy
2000 Seeds Cauliflower  Romanesco 11 - 4

2000 Seeds Cauliflower...

Price €11.00 - SKU: P 58
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>2000 Seeds Cauliflower Romanesco</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2000 (10g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Romanesco cauliflowers are a fantastic variety from Italy, producing stunning yellow green heads of spiral rosettes with an excellent flavour visually that resemble a pine cone.  Many Romanesco cauliflowers are spring maturing but this rare one that comes ready in the autumn (Oct-Nov), thus avoiding the need to overwinter it.</div> <div>Start indoors in a warm, well-lighted area from early March through June for the earliest of crops. Sow seeds ¼" deep in good compost. Keep evenly moist. Seedlings emerge in 5-8 days at 70º F.  They do best covered lightly with soil. Alternatively sow directly outside from early April.</div> <div>Transplant seedlings by at least Mid summer. They grow best at 55º to 65º F.  Do not let seedling become more that 5 weeks old because older seedlings do not mature well transplanted.</div> <div>Set plants 18" apart in rows 24" apart.  Transplant seedlings in late June  for Oct - Nov head harvest.</div> <div>Water deeply once a week in dry weather. Cultivate or mulch to control weeds. High fertility and abundant supply of water throughout the growing season are important.</div> <div> </div>
P 58
2000 Seeds Cauliflower  Romanesco 11 - 4
400+ Seeds Cherry Belle Tomato 5.5 - 1

400+ Seeds Cherry Belle Tomato

Price €5.50 - SKU: P 134 CP
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>400+ Seeds Cherry Belle Tomato</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 400+ seeds.</span></strong></span></h2> <p>A splendid variety producing high yields of extremely tasty, cherry tomatoes. Sow end January-April, harvest June-September. Suitable for greenhouse or outdoors.</p> <p>Culture: GREENHOUSE CULTURE: To grow in heated greenhouses sow January onwards, in a temperature of 16-18°C (60-65°F). Transplant into small pots. Plant out in large pots, growing bags, or into a soil border at 45cm (18") spacing. Pinch out side shoots regularly and when in flower tap or shake plants daily to aid setting. For growing in unheated greenhouses, sow in warmth, from March onwards. Plant late April-early May. Harvest mid August-mid October. OUTDOOR CULTURE: Sow in trays or pots indoors March-April and harden off the plants before planting 45cm (18") apart in early June. Choose a warm, sheltered position. Harvest mid August-mid October. Standard varieties: Support with stakes or canes. Pinch out the main growth when four good trusses have set. Bush varieties: These cease growing when 30-38cm (12-15") high. Dot not remove side shoots. Support is not essential, but short stakes will help control the plants and keep fruit clean.</p> </div>
P 134 CP
400+ Seeds Cherry Belle Tomato 5.5 - 1

Variety from Serbia
Tomato Seeds Novosadski Jabucar

450 Seeds Novosadski...

Price €4.50 - SKU: P 112
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Novosadski Jabucar Tomato 450 Seeds </strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 450 seeds (2g).</strong></span></h2> <div>70-80 days, Medium early variety, Indeterminate. The fruits are round, smooth, bright red, average weight is 130-150 g. He has a good ratio of total sugar and acid, with a dry matter content of 6 to 6.5% and a very good taste. It can be grown from seeds, and without support.</div> <div>History:</div> <div>Old tested variety from Serbia. 'Jabucar' means 'Apple' in Serbian.</div>
P 112
Tomato Seeds Novosadski Jabucar

Variety from Germany
Goldene Königin Tomato Seeds

850 Seeds Goldene Königin...

Price €15.00 - SKU: P 280
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Goldene Königin Tomato 850 Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#d0121a;"><strong>Price for Package of 850 (3g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>One of the oldest heirloom from Germany, known since 1886.</p> <p>A yellow tomato, which can be cultivated both in greenhouses and outdoors. medium early, indet., regular leaf plants, yellow-orange fruit round, Fruits weight approx. 100 g and have a unique but somewhat sweet flavor excellent aroma. 5-6 golden fruits per cluster, 100 g, round, 6-8 cm in diameter.</p> <p>The name means 'Golden Queen' in German, but this is not the same tomato as Golden Queen known in North America.</p> <p> </p> <p>Shape of fruit: Smooth Round</p> <p>Fruit color: Yellow</p> <p>Country of origin: Germany</p> <p>Year established: 1886</p>
P 280
Goldene Königin Tomato Seeds

Best seller product

Variety from Peru
Aji Charapita chili Seeds 2.25 - 1

Aji Charapita Chili 500 Seeds

Price €70.00 - SKU: C 111
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Aji Charapita Chili 500 Seeds World’s Most Expensive Chili</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 500 (0,9 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Our Charapita plants 2019 growing just fine (see pictures)</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>As you can see yourself from our photos, that the seeds are from our own plants (organically grown) and you know what you will get from the seeds you buy from us...</strong></span></p> <p>You should never judge a pepper by its size, especially when it comes to price. The Aji Charapita chili pepper grows is roughly the size of a pea, but there’s nothing small about its price. <span style="color: #000000;"><strong>A kilogram of this stuff will set you back a whopping 20,000 Euro.</strong></span></p> <p>Native to the jungles of norther Peru, the Aji Charapita is known as a wild pepper, and has only recently recently being cultivated for commercial use. Used fresh, this tiny pepper is said to have a strong fruity flavor that gives salsas and sauces a tropical taste, but it is mostly used in powdered form to a bit of spiciness to various dishes. Although still fairly unknown in most Western countries, the Aji Charapita is a highly sought-after treat among chili pepper connoisseurs and five-star restaurant chefs.</p> <p>Getting your hands on a few Aji Charapita peppers is a daunting task, for two very simple reasons. First of all, it is very difficult to source outside of Peru, unless you’re willing to buy some seeds online and plant them yourself, and even if you manage to find a seller, the price is probably going to curb your enthusiasm. Nicknamed “<strong>the mother of all chilli</strong>” Aji Charapita reportedly costs a minimum of $25,000 per kilo, making it the most expensive chili pepper in the world, and one of the most expensive spices, along with vanilla and saffron.</p> <p>With a Scolville hotness rating of between 30,000 – 50,000 heat units, the Aji Charapita will burn a hole through your tongue as well as your wallet. This rating makes it about as hot as a cayenne pepper and four to twenty times hotter than the jalapeño.</p> </body> </html>
C 111 500-S
Aji Charapita chili Seeds 2.25 - 1

Best seller product

Variety from Peru
Aji Charapita chili Seeds 2.25 - 1

Aji Charapita chili Seeds

Price €1.95 - SKU: C 111
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Aji Charapita chili Seeds World’s Most Expensive Chili</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10, 25, 50 (0.085g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Our Charapita plants 2020 growing just fine (see pictures)</strong></span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>As you can see yourself from our photos, that the seeds are from our own plants (organically grown) and you know what you will get from the seeds you buy from us...</strong></span></p> <p>This chili pepper is the most expensive in the world! Although still fairly unknown in most Western countries, the Aji Charapita is a highly sought-after treat among chili pepper connoisseurs and five-star restaurant chefs.  </p> <p>Native to the jungles of northern Peru, the Aji Charapita is known as wild chili pepper and has only recently being cultivated for commercial use.  Due to its rarity and hefty prices, it is often known as the <strong>"Mother of All Chilis"</strong> With a Scoville hotness rating of between 30,000 – 50,000 units, the Aji Charapita will burn a hole through your tongue as well as your wallet.</p> <p>Nicknamed “the mother of all chili” Aji Charapita reportedly costs a minimum of $25,000 per kilo, making it the most expensive chili pepper in the world, and one of the most expensive spices, along with vanilla and saffron.</p> <p>It may be small (up to 1 meter in height), but the Charapita chili or ‘aji Charapita’ as it is known in Peru is not to be underestimated. Aji Charapita (Capsicum chinense) or Charapita is a bushy shrub that produces masses of (over 400 fruits per plant) small maturing yellow round peppers. <br /><br />Used fresh, this tiny pepper has a strong fruity flavor that gives salsas and sauces a tropical taste, but it is mostly used in powdered form to a bit of spiciness to various dishes.  The ripe fruit was simply pierced or squeezed and the juice utilized as a piquant finishing spice on food. These chilies also bring many health benefits. Their capsaicinoids can help improve digestion and circulation when consumed as part of a balanced diet.</p> </body> </html>
C 111 (10 S)
Aji Charapita chili Seeds 2.25 - 1

Variety from Peru

Aji Panca Peruvian Black Chili broken fruits 10 Grams 2.25 - 5

Aji Panca Peruvian Black...

Price €2.25 - SKU: Z 82
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Aji Panca Peruvian Black Chili broken fruits 10 Grams</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price is for 10 Grams of broken fruits.</strong></span></h2> <p>Broken fruits, you can choose then if you want to make powder or crushed.</p> <p>There are so many ways in which you can use Ají panca chili. Cook it in soups, chop it up and toss it in salads or use it as a side dish for different meat dishes. The list of Ají panca chili recipes is almost endless, mainly because this is a very popular vegetable in many countries and chefs are always coming up with innovative ways of preparing Ají panca chili. Many vegetarian menus place Ají panca chili within the top ten plants, but this nutritious vegetable is also used in many meat-based dishes.</p>
Z 82
Aji Panca Peruvian Black Chili broken fruits 10 Grams 2.25 - 5

Variety from Peru
Ají Panca Peruvian Chili Seeds (Capsicum baccatum) 1.65 - 6

Aji Panca Peruvian Black...

Price €1.95 - SKU: C 130 AP
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Ají Panca Peruvian Black Chili Seeds (Capsicum baccatum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Ají Panca, also called Ají Especial, 1 Ají Colorado or Chile Peruano, is a cultivar of Capsicum chinense (a type of chili) that is grown in Peru, although it is also commonly associated with Capsicum baccatum. Considers one of the most used chili peppers in Peruvian cuisine.</p> <p> </p> <p>Commonly grown on the coast of Peru and measuring 8 to 13 centimeters long and 2.5 to 3 centimeters wide, it has thick flesh and fruity tones, it turns dark brown when ripe.</p> <p>A character from the story The knight Carmel by Abraham Valdelomar, the Ajíseco is named for its red plumage, it is commonly sun-dried on farms and sold dry, powdered or in paste form. That it is not so spicy if the veins have been removed and it is thrown away, but instead it is used for its flavor and color.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Uses :</strong></p> <p>There are so many ways in which you can use Ají panca chile. Cook it in soups, chop it up and toss it in salads or use it as a side dish for different meat dishes. The list of Ají panca chile recipes is almost endless, mainly because this is a very popular vegetable in many countries and chefs are always coming up with innovative ways of preparing Ají panca chile. Many vegetarian menus place Ají panca chile within the top ten plants, but this nutritious vegetable is also used in many meat-based dishes.</p> <p> </p> </body> </html>
C 130 AP
Ají Panca Peruvian Chili Seeds (Capsicum baccatum) 1.65 - 6